For 868 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Carr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 A Time for Drunken Horses
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
868 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Its breadth, profundity, and stunningly rendered vision make idealism seem renewed and breathtaking again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    It's all we ask of a film but almost never get, as it first makes us squirm, then makes us cheer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Fresh, original, and arresting.
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    From start to finish there's a shimmer of discovery about it - our discovery of it, Coppola's discovery of how much she can do.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Catchy and unobtrusively assured, it's both hip and innocent, stylized and natural, charming its way through a conventional hey-kids-let's-have-a-party plot with bright comedy, great dancing, and on-top-of-it rap. It even manages to send a few messages about responsibility without being boring. In short, it's the best teen genre movie in ages. [23 Mar 1990, p.43]
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Stillman has become a master at escalating the laughter by waiting an extra beat and then understating something devastatingly funny, as when someone looks Chris Eigeman's club manager, Des, in the eye and says, "I consider you a person of integrity - except, you know, in the matter of women."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Not only exhilarating and cathartic. It's too funny to be ignored.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Beyond its fresh twists on the cop and romance genres, Witness is, above all, an anti-consumption film. [08 Feb 1985]
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    It's not the mega-tech or the shootouts that make Ghost in the Shell memorable, but the ghostliness of it, its ability to convince us that Kusangai - no less than Rutger Hauer's strangely noble android in "Blade Runner" - has a human's ability to conceptualize her own mortality. Nor does arid intellectual speculation make Ghost in the Shell what it is. [1 Mar 1996, p.29]
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Carr
    While Last of the Mohicans is an eyeful - how could anything shot in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina not be? - it's mindless, meticulous in its externals, taking refuge from awareness by clinging to Cooper's distortions. In the end, it'll be remembered for its three S's: Stowe, Studi and the scenery. [25 Sep 1992, p.27]
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Carr
    There are laughs in it. But mostly you sit around waiting for it to be funnier, or at least funny more often. The problem is that it hasn't figured out a way to be funny while satisfyingly accommodating the pain in these characters.
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    A slick, twisty, top-of-the-line crime thriller with gorgeously sensual textures and a screenful of wickedly faceted performances.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Carr
    The triumph of La Cienaga lies in Martel's way of fashioning the kind of ensemble performance that draws us in by convincing us we're watching behavior, not acting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    While it preserves his baseball feats, it looks beyond them to clarify Greenberg's place in American culture.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Carr
    Good clean dirty fun.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Carr
    Risky Business is the sleeper of the summer. It's a refreshing change from the usual dumb teenage ripoffs, the slickest American film since "Trading Places" and "War Games," and a strong directorial debut for Paul Brickman, who knows his way around teen fantasies. [05 Aug 1983]
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    In short, Almodovar opens some new doors to his artists here, and they respond in surprising, captivating ways. [29 Mar 1996]
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Carr
    It's a snazzy, smartly made, and even hip little scarefest. As a jump-start to Halloween, it's all you could hope for.
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Carr
    Two scenes in Misery are shockingly brutal. But many more are wickedly amusing - especially the ones stemming from the fact that no small part of the writer's torture is the way his deranged muse uses language. There's something simultaneously comical and scary about the way Bates employs euphemisms to keep the lid on. [30 Nov 1990, p.29p]
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    As savage and as epic as film gets.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    It's filled with vivid characters and action. Beneath its modesty of gesture, it's one of the year's richest, most humane films.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    You'll care what happens in this film with more than enough freshness and originality to avoid succumbing to girls-on-the-run cliches.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    It's brilliantly precise in its detailing, stylishly jagged and sensual by turns, and utterly unpredictable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Carr
    I'd take a chance on it anyway, even if it stumbles and loses its way.
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    A story about the ravages of one war on a single man's soul and psyche becomes an eloquent plea for peace.
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Carr
    Titanic is a big-budget spectacle and director Cameron brings it off with high-tech bravura, placing us aboard the ship in real time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Carr
    Engrossing and eye-opening in several respects and even, when you least expect it, humorous.
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Carr
    A sleek little poison pill of a movie.
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Carr
    Both a lovingly crafted remembrance of things past and a deliberate broadening and darkening of the canvas Levinson previously filled in "Diner," "Tin Men," and "Avalon."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Oliver Stone's Born on the Fourth of July is a knockout, a huge angry howl of movie that uses a crippled Vietnam veteran's disability as metaphor for a country's paralysis. [5 Jan 1990, p.67]
    • Boston Globe

Top Trailers