For 769 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Carr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 A Bronx Tale
Lowest review score: 0 The Skulls
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 96 out of 769
769 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Films that achieve the dimension of seraphic embrace achieved by 'Innocence, as it explores a return to first love, are the rarest of the rare.
    • Boston Globe
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Sensuous and rarefied, elevating its particulars into epiphanies, The Long Day Closes is as joyful as introversion gets. [9 July 1993, p.25]
    • Boston Globe
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Music for the eyes. That's why it has become a treasured classic. That's why we'll see it again and again. [2002 re-release]
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Watching it is a nonstop high.
    • Boston Globe
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    It's more than science, more than biography, more than metaphor. Fusing all three and linking them to a profound human dimension that never cheapens the man or his macrospeculations, it ties them to shared human destiny. As Morris' elliptical style circles and deepens its themes with each pass, A Brief History of Time turns into film's own expanding universe. [14 Sep 1992, p.50]
    • Boston Globe
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Satisfying in every respect, it's a piece of blue-collar chamber music, never treating the characters cheaply, allowing them a complex entwinement of emotions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Deeper and richer in humanity than all but a handful of the American films released this year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Its breadth, profundity, and stunningly rendered vision make idealism seem renewed and breathtaking again.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    The surehandedly wrought, beautifully acted, almost unbearably tense In the Bedroom is a rare film, not to be missed.
    • Boston Globe
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Hoop Dreams is without peer among sports-oriented documentaries to the extent that it's about people before it's about athletic feats. It respects its subjects' complexity and tenacity while nailing the problematic, double-edged influence of sports in America. In fact, no film has ever combined sports and family values as powerfully as Hoop Dreams. There's simply nothing like it. [21 Oct 1994, p.47]
    • Boston Globe
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Bizarre, shadowy, enticingly eerie...more poetic, more tantalizingly original.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Not since the original ''Star Wars'' trilogy has film dipped into myth and emerged with the kind of weight and heft seen in Peter Jackson's first installment of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy.
    • Boston Globe
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Farnsworth's embodiment of old American values, with their combination of delicacy, reserve, and stand-alone independence, is a one-of-a-kind treasure.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Catchy and unobtrusively assured, it's both hip and innocent, stylized and natural, charming its way through a conventional hey-kids-let's-have-a-party plot with bright comedy, great dancing, and on-top-of-it rap. It even manages to send a few messages about responsibility without being boring. In short, it's the best teen genre movie in ages. [23 Mar 1990, p.43]
    • Boston Globe
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    It rates a resounding yes because it doesn't insult our emotional intelligence. [23 Nov 1983]
    • Boston Globe
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Intriguing, arresting, delightfully refusing to be pigeonholed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Oliver Stone's Born on the Fourth of July is a knockout, a huge angry howl of movie that uses a crippled Vietnam veteran's disability as metaphor for a country's paralysis. [5 Jan 1990, p.67]
    • Boston Globe
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Never has a film taken such relish in between-the-wars malice as Gosford Park.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Spacey is diamond-brilliant in a role that plays as if custom-made for him.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    It's an instant classic, in every way the equal of the great Disney animations of the past. [22 Nov 1991, p.33]
    • Boston Globe
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    We're in a golden age of comedy, and one of the reasons is Margaret Cho.
    • Boston Globe
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    A sweet screenful of quirky chaos.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    One of the year's most winning performances, Logue's Dex will grow on you as he stumbles toward emotional fullness.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    What makes Toy Story such a dazzling surprise is that while technological novelty is partly what it's about, it transcends technology. [22 Nov 1995, p.29]
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Stillman has become a master at escalating the laughter by waiting an extra beat and then understating something devastatingly funny, as when someone looks Chris Eigeman's club manager, Des, in the eye and says, "I consider you a person of integrity - except, you know, in the matter of women."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Vincent and Theo is one of the great Robert Altman films... It's Altman's most structurally conventional film, although it's filled with such trademarks as overlapping conversations. It's also his most personal and deeply felt. [16 Nov 1990, p.81]
    • Boston Globe
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Nobody ever placed brilliance in the service of silliness quite the way the Python gang did. Monty Python and the Holy Grail is stuffed with both.
    • Boston Globe
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    Driving Miss Daisy, about the deepening relationship between a Jewish matron in Atlanta and her black chauffeur, is a luminous joy of a film, heartbreakingly delicate, effortlessly able through indirection to invoke the civil rights era without ever once slipping into portentous pronouncements. [12 Jan. 1990, p.35]
    • Boston Globe
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    You can count on the fingers of one hand the number of works in any given year to which one is moved to apply the word ''masterpiece.'' Raul Ruiz's Time Regained is one of them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Carr
    A grand, dark, grave, severe piece of first-rate cinema.
    • Boston Globe

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