For 749 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Carr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 A Brief History of Time
Lowest review score: 0 The Skulls
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 96 out of 749
749 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Sad, funny, brilliant.
    • Boston Globe
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    The cinematic equivalent of a high, arching rainbow of a three-pointer from midcourt.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    A slick, twisty, top-of-the-line crime thriller with gorgeously sensual textures and a screenful of wickedly faceted performances.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    It's the best drug-busting movie since ''The French Connection.''
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    The film makes more apparent than ever that Howard is quite underrated as a filmmaker, possibly because he's been hidden in full view in the mainstream for so long.
    • Boston Globe
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Superior and original filmmaking. You won't be able to take your eyes off it.
    • Boston Globe
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    The film's bountiful warmth and gusto do their work. By the end, we feel part of the family, too.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Serendipity returns us, if only for a couple of hours, to the Manhattan of our dreams.
    • Boston Globe
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    It's a treat to encounter the deadpan light-handedness with which Mamet goes about his business.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Whatever portion of the alienated teen angst championship Thora Birch left unclaimed after ''American Beauty,'' she nails down brilliantly in Ghost World.
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Fresh, original, and arresting.
    • Boston Globe
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    The most disorienting and trippiest data-retrieval caper in years.
    • Boston Globe
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    In short, Almodovar opens some new doors to his artists here, and they respond in surprising, captivating ways. [29 Mar 1996]
    • Boston Globe
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Jude is a modernized version of Hardy, but a handsome, fluid and red-blooded one that has no difficulty finding correlatives to the prejudice and hatred of wit and spirit against which Hardy, in his gimlet-eyed way, so passionately attacked. [25 Oct 1996]
    • Boston Globe
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Unstrung Heroes, with its small, detailed brush strokes and its eye for specifics, marks Diane Keaton's directorial breakthrough. [15 Sep 1995]
    • Boston Globe
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Gray's haunted, obsessional riffs are absorbing theater. Because Demme had the good sense to lay back and not beat them over the head with his cameras, they're equally compelling on film. [27 Mar 1987]
    • Boston Globe
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    It's also [Coppola's] most gloriously extravagant film since "One from the Heart." [12 Aug 1988]
    • Boston Globe
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Drugstore Cowboy, Gus Van Sant's fresh, gutsy societal underbelly film, never wallows in picturesque down-and-outism, except at the end, when Dillon's character, frightened by the death of a girl he didn't like much and spooked by his own paranoiac suspicion, checks into a seedy hotel while trying to go cold turkey and not yield to the influence of a junkie priest drolly played by William Burroughs. [27 Oct 1989]
    • Boston Globe
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Kevin Costner's epic Wyatt Earp literally and figuratively gives you more of the legendary lawman than any of the other famous movies about him. [24 Jun 1994, p.47]
    • Boston Globe
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Beyond its fresh twists on the cop and romance genres, Witness is, above all, an anti-consumption film. [08 Feb 1985]
    • Boston Globe
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Friday is funnier and funkier than "Bad Boys," more homegrown-seeming, less manufactured. It plays like "House Party" with attitude. [26 Apr 1995]
    • Boston Globe
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    It's easily the best of the movies I've seen by the various "Saturday Night Live" alumni, and part of the reason it's funny and satisfying is that it doesn't strain. [09 Jun 1983]
    • Boston Globe
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Mad Dog and Glory is the funniest and most original studio comedy since "White Men Can't Jump." What makes it fun is its ability to find new ways to do old things. [5 Mar 1993, p.61]
    • Boston Globe
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    What Gibson gives us is a portrait of a man behaving gracefully under several kinds of pressure, some of it shamefully unfair. It's a solid acting achievement, and his directing, which never calls attention to itself, is right on the money, too. The Man Without a Face is an affecting evocation of a man of principle who teaches a boy what's important. [25 Aug 1993, p.53]
    • Boston Globe
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Natural Born Killers is going to be a love-it or hate-it film. But it's an important film. Pumped up, jumped up, yet asking the right questions, [it] is more than an attention-grabber. It's a grenade pitched into the media tent. [26 Aug 1994, p.51]
    • Boston Globe
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Stone's film rolls off the screen with affection and authority, even when Morrison's life enters its sodden, bummed-out finale, and Val Kilmer does an uncanny job of identifying with Morrison. [01 Mar 1991]
    • Boston Globe
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Director Penny Marshall's choreography encompasses emotional as well as physical ebbs and flows. Awakenings lives up to its title. [11 Jan 1991]
    • Boston Globe
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    What keeps the film going, and helps it keep its comic tone, is the constant threat of cataclysm - and the deadpan Buster Keaton charm of the ever-responsive Pinon as he combats the giant Rube Goldberg meat-grinder that the house, in effect, is. [17 Apr 1992]
    • Boston Globe
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    What sets Tequila Sunrise apart is its layering, its existential dimension. The characters played by Gibson and Russell have been sanded down by a kind of fatalism we normally associate with characters in French gangster movies. There's more than one facet to them. They're entertaining. And urgent. Even when they're just going through routine genre moves, they put laid-back spin on them. [2 Dec 1988, p.29]
    • Boston Globe
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Jay Carr
    Funny, gritty, filled with surprising stabs of feeling, Parenthood is a stretch for Ron Howard, its director. This new adult comedy has the generosity of "Cocoon" and "Splash," but it takes Howard into deeper, darker, messier territory. [2 Aug 1989, p.57]
    • Boston Globe