For 134 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Witches of Eastwick
Lowest review score: 0 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 80 out of 134
  2. Negative: 34 out of 134
134 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Spielberg hooks us again with state-of-the-art craft, the director taps into powerful myths, both primal and pop, and makes them seem new. He allows grownups to return to childhood, but manages to catch fish in all generational waters.
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    An efficient, cold-blooded sci-fi splatter movie that never makes the mistake of forgetting that on some level it is deeply ridiculous.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    The movie blows through the Brat Pack smoke screen - it is superior to Colors in that regard - to reveal the troubled, lonely and sometimes crazy males behind the macho, misogynist posturing of men in groups. You couldn't find a nicer bunch of killers. [12 Aug 1988, p.C3]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    An adolescent-oriented farce so finely tuned it projects beyond its narrow intended audience - it's not only for adolescents, it's for anyone who remembers what adolescence was like. [05 Aug 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    It's an undemanding yet bright delight. [16 Mar 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    Paradoxically cerebral and primal, reasonable and anti-rational, life- affirming and nihilistic, Naked Lunch is a sensual and intellectual feast. It will not be a meal to everyone's taste, but in its bizarre class, there is nothing classier. [10 Jan 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Jay Scott
    In Hollywood terms, Beverly Hills Cop harks back to the semi- good old days, to the studio era when stars were not always relied on to fix everything - this is unquestionably a star vehicle, but the star, an employee of his own production company, has been smart enough to surround himself with other, by no means lesser lights. [4 Dec. 1984]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    The reign of the last emperor, a reign in name alone, was an exercise in style over substance; it is perhaps fitting that his cinematic biography should follow the same incarcerated course. [20 Nov 1987, p.D1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Days of Thunder relies on charm, loud noise and a few racing sequences to print money with Cocky's visage on the bills: there can be no suspense because there can be no possibility Cocky will lose. [29 Jun 1990, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    The achievement of Educating Rita is a function of the distinguished performances, the agreeably archetypal situation and the scissor-sharp lines. [23 Sep 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Scarface is a B- movie with singularly silly psychological pretensions: its neo-primitivism is to the complex moral cosmos of Francis Coppola's "Godfather" saga as Disney is to Dickens. [09 Dec 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Rocky V, for all its faults, is not awful. It is inferior to the charmingly naive, Cinderella-in-sweat-pants opener of 14 years ago, but it's far superior to every other overdetermined installment. [21 Nov 1990, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    There is something very wrong with the attempt of Nine 1/2 Weeks to excite the sensualists and appease the moralists at the same time. Most of the sex is fairly mild, but there are hints of what Nine 1/2 Weeks must have been before Lyne was forced to recut it. [21 Feb 1986, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Like Pretty Woman, Green Card doesn't aim high - comedy, sentimentality, sex and pathos are sufficient for its scheme of fantasy things - but with the exception of MacDowell, it achieves its modest aims unerringly. [11 Jan 1991, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Judged by the standards of the comedies that preceded it (and only by those standards), Ghostbusters is relatively sophisticated: it substitutes the silly for the gross, and even manages at the odd moment to take silliness into the sublime. [9 June 1984]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    The frantic pleasures of this film add up to what used to be considered good fun; good Saturday morning fun; good Saturday morning fun to eat pancakes and pour maple syrup by; good fun that, once the day begins, is good fun soon forgotten. It's a pity Flash Gordon can't be screened at the breakfast table. [6 Dec 1980, p.E7]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Is it worth seeing? Yes. The ability to charm in the modern world is rare, and Ishtar does charm. Essentially, it's a teen film for adults, which is to say, it's mindless but not stupid good fun. And there are at least four times when the audience laughs out loud.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Despite some casting problems, director paints a convincing portrait of a frenzied world. [11 Dec 1987, p.D1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    No matter how many times the script instructs us that Valmont is "conspicuously charming," Malkovich is not charming, conspicuously or otherwise.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    The Dead Zone, from the book by Stephen King, a horror novelist whose prolific output is the scariest thing about him, is academic filmmaking all the way, a crafty Establishment tour de force. [21 Oct 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    There are individual sequences alternately amusing and touching. [08 May 1984]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    First Blood is a gung-ho action flick fast enough and brutal enough to become Stallone's first non-Rocky hit; on the profound sympathetic levels it seeks to address, however, it is an emission of profound stupidity. [22 Oct 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Black Stallion Returns is not a magic monument - it's only a terrific film for kids. [26 Mar 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Mosquito Coast is a work of consummate craftsmanship and it's spectacularly acted, down to the smallest roles (Martha Plimpton as a classically obstreperous preacher's daughter, for example), but its field of vision is as narrow and eventually as claustrophobic as Allie's. [28 Nov 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The film is primarily an excuse for Chase to demonstrate that though he may be a movie star he has yet to learn how to create, let alone sustain, a character, and for director Harold (Caddyshack) Ramis and screenwriter John (National Lampoon's Class Reunion) Hughes to demonstrate that some movie stars get the colleagues they deserve. [2 Aug 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The plot is squeezed dry in this bloody Valentine from Hollywood and becomes annoyingly predictable. Thriller stumbles on its own success
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Delicatessen is a carniverous sausage - lots of fat, a few meaty bits. [10 Apr 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    This is an honestly moving, ungainly film. [25 Mar 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Rob Reiner's not up to it: when the movie is meant to be romantic, the tone is frequently mushy and sexless, and when it's meant to be anachronistic and satiric, it's vaudeville-vulgar.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    If you see Clue only once, and it's hard to imagine seeing it more than once, even for the five different minutes, the "A" is by far the best, featuring as it does (this does not give away the identity of the murderer) a splendidly funny shtick from Madeline Kahn. [13 Dec 1985, p.D5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

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