For 222 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Time Bandits
Lowest review score: 0 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 56 out of 222
222 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    What's wrong with The Color Purple - and nothing that's wrong with it keeps it from being a joy to watch - is what you'd expect of Spielberg: he chews on Alice Walker's hard edges until they're gummy. [21 Dec 1985]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Despite some casting problems, director paints a convincing portrait of a frenzied world. [11 Dec 1987, p.D1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    No matter how many times the script instructs us that Valmont is "conspicuously charming," Malkovich is not charming, conspicuously or otherwise.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    The Dead Zone, from the book by Stephen King, a horror novelist whose prolific output is the scariest thing about him, is academic filmmaking all the way, a crafty Establishment tour de force. [21 Oct 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Jay Scott
    Whoopi Goldberg can make you laugh and make you cry, and she's attractive and kind of come-hithery in her own bug-eyed way. [10 Oct 1986, p.D1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    There are individual sequences alternately amusing and touching. [08 May 1984]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    First Blood is a gung-ho action flick fast enough and brutal enough to become Stallone's first non-Rocky hit; on the profound sympathetic levels it seeks to address, however, it is an emission of profound stupidity. [22 Oct 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Black Stallion Returns is not a magic monument - it's only a terrific film for kids. [26 Mar 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Altered States can be accused of many things, but never of harboring a new idea. Because the script's lessons have been drowned in fruity religious imagery, Altered States is at most an accomplished horror film, the kind of stomach-churning movie to which people like David Cronenberg aspire. [23 Jan 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Mosquito Coast is a work of consummate craftsmanship and it's spectacularly acted, down to the smallest roles (Martha Plimpton as a classically obstreperous preacher's daughter, for example), but its field of vision is as narrow and eventually as claustrophobic as Allie's. [28 Nov 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    National Lampoon's European Vacation is directed by Amy Heckerling, whose career began with the spunky if not inventive Fast Times at Ridgemont High and continued with the inventive if not spunky Johnny Dangerously; this time, she's responsible for a picture that's neither inventive nor spunky. [29 July 1985]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    When Christine's on the warpath, she foams at the grille. But her movie doesn't do right by her snottiness. Her movie, never scary but campily entertaining for about an hour, loses compression toward the end and the grumpy old thing finally sputters to a stall - gets flattened, poops out. [09 Dec 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The film is primarily an excuse for Chase to demonstrate that though he may be a movie star he has yet to learn how to create, let alone sustain, a character, and for director Harold (Caddyshack) Ramis and screenwriter John (National Lampoon's Class Reunion) Hughes to demonstrate that some movie stars get the colleagues they deserve. [2 Aug 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The plot is squeezed dry in this bloody Valentine from Hollywood and becomes annoyingly predictable. Thriller stumbles on its own success
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Writer-director Tommy Lee Wallace is not, as can be gathered, a born auteur, but he is crafty at timing the jumpies - despite a silliness that increases as the movie goes on, there are enough left-field shocks to please even the most discriminating fan of what American Film has dubbed the "genre non grata. [25 Oct 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Fried Green Tomatoes was obviously cooked up with the best of intentions but, like the dish to which it refers, it's rudimentary eats - not quite junk food, but not quite nourishing, either. [03 Jan 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Delicatessen is a carniverous sausage - lots of fat, a few meaty bits. [10 Apr 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Because it attempts so much more than Excalibur, the disappointment of Knightriders cuts deeper. Romero wants to tell the tale, to comment on it and to relate it to the present; he wants to bring contemporary satirical life to the myth, a service he performed cannily for the Dracula legend in Martin. [18 April 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    This is an honestly moving, ungainly film. [25 Mar 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Neither Nicholson nor the talented Miss Steenburgen, in her film debut, could rise above the patched-together script. The promising parody of anti-mythic Westerns, and of mellerdrammers (the railroad wants to snitch Julia's land), decays into a love story whose parameters are all too narrow and all too familiar. [07 Oct 1978]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Although Tom Stoppard's script lifts Ballard's spare dialogue directly from the page, the context in which it is placed is kitsch. [11 Dec 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Rob Reiner's not up to it: when the movie is meant to be romantic, the tone is frequently mushy and sexless, and when it's meant to be anachronistic and satiric, it's vaudeville-vulgar.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    Ruthless People is a farce rather than a satire and it's far less ambivalent toward the behavior it depicts than All in the Family was - it actively encourages the audience to tee-hee over people being horrible to each other. Dale Launer's script is often extremely funny, especially when Midler is around, but it's an extended sick joke that doesn't realize it's got a disease. [27 June 1986, p.D1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    If you see Clue only once, and it's hard to imagine seeing it more than once, even for the five different minutes, the "A" is by far the best, featuring as it does (this does not give away the identity of the murderer) a splendidly funny shtick from Madeline Kahn. [13 Dec 1985, p.D5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    David Keith, a native of Tennessee, had a tiny role in The Rose (as Bette Midler's soldier friend) and he is one of the few in the Brubaker cast whose accent is authentic and who appears to have the wherewithal to survive in a penitentiary. His scenes are the only respite from the movie's shrill, simplistic self-congratulation. [21 June 1980]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    When it's good, it's because it's imitating its predecessor (but it suffers from tired spilled blood) and when it's bad, it's because it's imitating its own imitators. [31 Oct 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The Year of Living Dangerously is chic, enigmatic, self-assured - and empty. [18 Feb 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The reach of this sprawling, ambitious epic often exceeds its grasp. It has something in common with its hero. [5 Dec 1981]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    The humour is based entirely on inversion which worked in your cartoons, and even on the TV show, but it's not enough to hold up a movie, even with the helping hand provided by a disembodied hand. [22 Nov 1991]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Scott
    There are lively, compelling scenes, particularly in the first hour - Raimi has an indubitable talent for camp mayhem - but the picture escalates into absurdity and the last half hour, essentially a chase sequence, is marred by suprisingly cheesy special effects. [24 Aug. 1990]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

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