Jay Weissberg
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For 33 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 24% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 70% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jay Weissberg's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Timbuktu
Lowest review score: 10 Another Me
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 33
  2. Negative: 4 out of 33
33 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Jay Weissberg
    In the hands of a master, indignation and tragedy can be rendered with clarity yet subtlety, setting hysteria aside for deeper, more richly shaded tones. Abderrahmane Sissako is just such a master.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jay Weissberg
    With enormous sympathy for all, Al Mansour captures the isolation of Saudi women and their parallel lives of freedom at home and invisibility outside.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jay Weissberg
    Less a portrait of an individual than of an unchecked culture where the lure of staggering profits eliminates ethics, Universe subtly exposes the pernicious effects of deregulation and does so in an ingeniously cinematic manner.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jay Weissberg
    Fernandez (“Used Parts”) has a masterful handle on narrative, structure and character, skillfully blending them all in a tale with atmosphere to spare.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Jay Weissberg
    The Young and Prodigious T.S. Spivet is the perfect 3D vehicle and Jeunet takes full advantage, offering a feast of amusing visual flourishes suited to the book’s playfulness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jay Weissberg
    Deliberately ambiguous in how it approaches the inexorable nexus of violence, Omar will trouble those looking for condemnation rather than the messiness of humanity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jay Weissberg
    Batra adeptly plays on the tension of will they or won’t they meet, making good decisions based on character and situation rather than the need to uplift an audience.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jay Weissberg
    Szifron does a terrific job of pacing thanks to expert editing (he shares credit with Pablo Barbieri) within each episode and a genuinely subversive sense of humor.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jay Weissberg
    The effect of National Gallery is to reinforce the notion that paintings are objects to know and understand.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jay Weissberg
    It’s impossible not to be charmed on some level by Jung Henin and Laurent Boileau’s Approved for Adoption, though it’s best not to ask for too much.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jay Weissberg
    Archambault’s handling of Gabrielle and Martin’s sexuality is one of the pic’s strong suits, presenting their desire with a refreshing, straightforward honesty.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jay Weissberg
    Ultimately, the training and suicide mission are less interesting to Ayouch than the initial forming of character, and the fundamentalist cell members are only stock figures; what’s important is the group’s sense of disenfranchisement and the lure of inner peace.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jay Weissberg
    "Beauty" has numerous scenes of enormous power, though removing one unnecessary plot strand would allow deeper probing elsewhere.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Jay Weissberg
    Less satisfying than his previous pic, yet still a bold, melancholy statement.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jay Weissberg
    The pic nicely straddles a line between Sosa’s private and public personas, never quite delving deep although Vila covers all the bases.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jay Weissberg
    An appealing yet oddly insubstantial work, like an early impressionist sketch in need of a little more focus, and perhaps a more suitable frame.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Jay Weissberg
    Some stunning shots and a likable protag can’t cover up the story’s shallowness.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Weissberg
    Discerning Verhoeven’s hand in it all is difficult, though true to the helmer’s more intimate style, it largely revolves around sex, and has a few fun plot twists.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Weissberg
    For some time, the pic holds interest while constantly frustrating curiosity with the way it parses out information, but soon after the midway point the game becomes tedious, and attention slackens considerably even as Gong-ju’s ordeal becomes clear.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jay Weissberg
    [A] slight, predictable debut.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jay Weissberg
    Kleist’s direct language and straightforward storytelling are nowhere in evidence in Pallieres’ narratively challenged adaptation, featuring a French-speaking Mads Mikkelsen in one of his least impressive characterizations.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jay Weissberg
    Intermittently interesting but more often pretentious, this sluggish exploration of time as real and conceived concepts rarely does more than regurgitate philosophical platitudes without locating the depth to make them interesting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Jay Weissberg
    [A] film with a maddeningly opaque narrative and a brutalizing cascade of nonstop verbiage.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jay Weissberg
    Aiming for a Hitchcockian take on an eccentric auctioneer (well-handled by Geoffrey Rush) who becomes enamored of an heiress with severe agoraphobia, the pic ends up more in Dan Brown territory, with over-obvious setups and phony insight into the art establishment.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jay Weissberg
    The script, co-written by vet Mardik Martin, is pedestrian, and the mise-en-scene, striving hard for a classic Hollywood look, lacks grandeur, notwithstanding impressive location work.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jay Weissberg
    Sure, some of these dames and geezers are fun, and it’s heartening to see them pushing themselves for what’s likely their last expedition, yet Gaynes forgets that even schmaltz needs salt and pepper.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jay Weissberg
    Only a curmudgeon would deny the pic its moments of clean, wholly predictable fun.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Jay Weissberg
    The adaptation lacks a strong enough sense of modulated construction, making for a tedious sit. One of the biggest problems, though, is the performances.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jay Weissberg
    It’s as if the director can’t decide what he wants: to chronicle the disintegration of a family, or to take a magnifying glass to a woman whose mania overwhelms all rational thought.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Jay Weissberg
    Assaults are filmed in ubiquitous slow-mo to better register the way bodies are thrown into the air. It’s all rather confusing, actually, since the monochromatic tonalities and weak script, lacking in any comprehensible battle strategy, tend to meld the two sides together.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Jay Weissberg
    When does an exercise in style become a wearying ADD slog through blood-splattered pseudo-Freudian nonsense? When it’s The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 20 Jay Weissberg
    A low-budget potboiler with an overblown score not loud enough to drown out the hackneyed dialogue.