Jean Oppenheimer
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For 144 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jean Oppenheimer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 No Man's Land
Lowest review score: 0 Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 81 out of 144
  2. Negative: 14 out of 144
144 movie reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Jean Oppenheimer
    So enchanting it takes your breath away.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    Despite its two-and-a-half hour running time, the movie flies by, so absorbing are its story, songs and stars.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    A beautiful but depressing film.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Be forewarned: Scenes of the protagonist learning to swallow the drug pellets will make many viewers queasy. Rarely has the power of suggestion been so unsettling.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Jean Oppenheimer
    Viewers still need a window into a character's soul if they are to connect on a deep emotional level. And that is missing here.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jean Oppenheimer
    Turns out to be more than simply a near-miracle of filmmaking, however; it is also an astonishing work of art, a historical epic that drifts through one's consciousness like a reverie.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    An extraordinary film from a born filmmaker.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    When all is said and done, Far from Heaven proves an easier film to appreciate than to emotionally embrace. It fails the test of being, in the descriptive phrase of Pauline Kael, "compulsively watchable."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Jean Oppenheimer
    Tanovic describes it as "a very serious film with a sense of humor." It is an apt description for a very remarkable film, one of the best of the year.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    A spare film, with little dialogue but a lot to say.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    A film of tremendous complexity and depth, a galvanic force that sends the mind reeling.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    While Sollett provided cast members with a detailed breakdown of the story--a kind of narrative guide--he wanted them to improvise their own dialogue based on how they would react to a similar situation in their own lives....The result is quite extraordinary.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Nothing, however, can diminish the sense of horror we feel at what happened that day in September, while Macdonald's revelations and the candid comments he elicits more than make up for the film's less successful elements.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Thanks to the performances and McCarthy's understated script and direction, the film walked off with both the Audience Award at the Sundance Film Festival and the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jean Oppenheimer
    Devotees of the comedienne presumably will think they have died and gone to heaven, while Cho virgins may laugh aloud a half-dozen times but probably won't become converts.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    A beautiful film from Iran explores beauty both physical and spiritual.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    The story itself is absolutely amazing, and the sense of outrage it evokes is universal, but director Noyce faces a difficult task in that once the story is set in motion there is very little action, other than walking shots of the girls, and almost no dialogue.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    But in a calculated move that pays off handsomely, the picture's remarkable power is reserved for the end, when the intertwining themes coalesce in an extraordinarily satisfying and stirring way.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jean Oppenheimer
    A riveting movie that's as entertaining as it is socially and politically important.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    Emotionally gripping from start to finish, the movie presents an electrifying and unforgettable look at life in a place that God has all but forgotten.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Cheadle, always a fine actor, is outstanding here--an almost willfully naive yet uncommonly decent man who sees civilization crashing and burning around him yet who, almost against his own better judgment, refuses to give in to it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    This engaging film proves a total pleasure, suitable for moviegoers who like their films a bit old-fashioned but still mainstream.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Fascinating and engrossing on every conceivable level
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Huppert has never looked more beautiful. Despite her severe expression and lack of makeup, her face communicates enormous character. She proves absolutely spellbinding.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    The film proves unrelentingly grim -- and equally engrossing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    It's the best thing Wong has done in years--perhaps ever.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Pulsates with music, dance, color and laughter, but also glows with quiet moments of drama.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    It is that rare find: a film that is as emotionally truthful as it is satisfying.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Demy's films are often described in terms of music; this one is more like a tango in which one person leads and refuses to forfeit the position.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Jean Oppenheimer
    As an actress, she (July) is annoying as hell, with a quirkiness so labored, she seems to be begging for our affection. As a director she is much better.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Though we know the story's final outcome, the trial scene and its aftermath are no less shocking and affecting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Both actors are marvelous, and the film, low-key but heartfelt, is a gem.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    A modest, uneventful film, buoyed by fine, albeit low-key, performances and the ring of truth.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Rich in story, character, and design, The Cider House Rules is obviously a collaborative effort, but above all it is a triumph for director Hallström.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    A character study, the film succeeds in large measure due to the kinetically charged performance of Romain Duris.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Although frustratingly confusing -- often the viewer can't be sure who is on which side or why -- the film brims with physical grandeur, exquisite costumes, and a captivating performance by Blanchett.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    A disarmingly funny, clear-eyed, and affectionate memory piece.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    The charismatic Jamal has the spirit of a young Antoine Doinel, and Winterbottom shoots him to evoke the memory of Truffaut's young hero.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Offers both a gentle humor and a sly but unmistakable optimism about what life in Iran might one day be.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Sly and corrosively funny political black comedy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    The acting is remarkable across the board, undoubtedly a combination of a strong script, gifted actors and exceptional direction.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    The two lead performances are so good it contains more emotional depth than it probably has a right to.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Shot in black and white by the renowned Raoul Coutard, and with a score by Michel Legrand, the film represents an idealized view of reality that will strike some viewers (including this one) as overly sentimental.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    Pure joy to watch -- and an invaluable documentary record of a bygone era.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    That the film is good rather than great proves a disappointment, but just finding a good film these days is rare, especially a big studio picture.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Enormously appealing romantic comedy-drama.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    In her first major role, Ferrera is amazing -- It is a wonderfully natural performance. To top it all off, she and Ontiveros are completely believable as mother and daughter.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    While too many things about the story don't ring true for the film as a whole to work, there is enough in Next Stop Wonderland to keep the viewer wide awake and entertained.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    A gentle, beautifully realized tale of love and intimacy...It moved me to tears.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Jean Oppenheimer
    That this mess should come from the hand of Istvan Szabo, the brilliant Hungarian director of "Mephisto" and "Colonel Redl," is the real shocker.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Jean Oppenheimer
    Like gathering storm clouds, Donnie Darko creates an atmosphere of eerie calm and mounting menace -- stands as one of the most exceptional movies of 2001.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    A delicious little thriller about an uptight, ill-humored English mystery writer who becomes enmeshed in murder, Swimming Pool is at once comical, contrary, resourceful and ambiguous.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Packs an unexpected emotional wallop. Gavin Hood's film tells a story of violence and redemption that's even more remarkable when you consider that neither of the lead performers had ever acted in a movie previously.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    A bleak, beautiful film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jean Oppenheimer
    Although meant as a light comedy-drama in which both characters are sympathetic, The Housekeeper instead proves irritating.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    A charming little film, filled with eccentric characters and ingratiating performances.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    This terrific movie manages to invest kitchen-sink realism with the soul of a fairy tale.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Adding to the film's underlying sense of urgency and unease is composer Robert Miller's haunting score, so reminiscent of Philip Glass' music for "The Fog of War."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Last Days shouldn't be half as engrossing as it turns out to be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    It's a melodrama more than a drama, a light thriller –- which is not to say that it is not wonderfully entertaining and satisfying. In fact, it is both.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jean Oppenheimer
    Schultze has a spare style, deliberately slow pace, and so little dialogue that to say it's in German with English subtitles seems to be stretching the truth.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Alternately heartrending and buoyant, tragic and sweetly humorous, the film leaves an indelible impression on the heart and mind. It's among the best of the year.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    Does a masterful job of combining digital imagery and voice performance to create totally believable animal characters.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Pak's writing has a simplicity that belies the film's emotional impact.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Explores a wealth of issues and conflicting ideologies.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jean Oppenheimer
    A major weakness of A Soldier's Daughter is that it has no real plot.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    This latest adventure proves to be a suitably sweet addition to Pooh's cinematic canon.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Emotionally powerful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jean Oppenheimer
    Certainly a terrific sense of urgency underlies the story and Tom's desperation over Claire is palpable, but that may not be enough for viewers who actually like to understand how the riddle is unraveling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    An engaging, family-oriented romantic comedy that should appeal as much to fans of the original movie as to viewers unfamiliar with the 1961 Hayley Mills version.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jean Oppenheimer
    The film provides solid entertainment for kids but lacks any real sense of wonder and magic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jean Oppenheimer
    A small story, with fewer lofty ambitions than its lead character, the film runs out of steam at a certain point. Overall, its leisurely pace and lack of overt action will bore some filmgoers, while the movie's final section, during which Ganesh pursues his political aspirations, feels strangely hurried and less satisfying than the rest of the story.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Combines strong feminist sensibilities with surprisingly old-fashioned melodrama.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Jean Oppenheimer
    The problem with Secretary isn't that it is offensive or unnerving -- although you get the idea the filmmakers hoped it might be at least one of those. The problem is that the story is slow-moving and dull.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Farmanara, the actor, brings a real poignancy to the role and, thus, to the story that seems, more than anything, the tale of a man coming to terms with his life.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Jean Oppenheimer
    The Dying Gaul becomes so overwrought in the last act that it ends up as pure histrionics.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Worth the price of admission if only to see the slinky Thurman decked out in a form-fitting, sequined pre-flapper era outfit. The word stunning hardly does her justice.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Far superior to either "Life Is Beautiful" or "Jakob the Liar."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    No matter how restrained the direction or unsentimental the performances -- and White Oleander scores points for both -- there is no escaping the semi-trashy but oh-so-life-affirming ring of the plot.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Far more than a mere visual feast.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    Viewers with a low tolerance for sentiment may balk, but the emotions are so true and the characters so appealing that the film should completely win you over.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    This intriguing jigsaw puzzle is visually arresting, narratively inventive, and psychologically enigmatic.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Jean Oppenheimer
    Don Cheadle is wonderful, as always, as the former drug-addict-turned-psychiatrist who worries it's all hopeless but refuses to stop trying. Sounds clichéd, perhaps, but for the most part it works, thanks to piercingly authentic performances.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jean Oppenheimer
    Slick, glossy, and artificial.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jean Oppenheimer
    Oddly, the film's strengths -- its quiet, understated manner; its non-plot; the awkward speech patterns and uncomfortable pauses that suggest emotional isolation -- are also its weaknesses.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jean Oppenheimer
    Viewers expecting another enchanting, whimsical tale of high energy and mischievous spirits will be sorely disappointed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jean Oppenheimer
    The film takes an incredibly wrong turn when it shifts to the courtroom trial -- It all but kills any goodwill Silberling has engendered up to this point.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    So inventive, confident, and accomplished is the production that it's a shock to learn Sliding Doors is the work of a first-time director-screenwriter.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    The film is worth seeing for Sorvino alone. The actress hasn't been this good since Woody Allen's "Mighty Aphrodite," a role that couldn't be more dissimilar.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jean Oppenheimer
    Nelson has directed his actors--including David Arquette, Steve Buscemi and Daniel Benzali (no, this isn't a joke)--to speak in David Mamet-like cadence, all short, choppy sentences and staccato rhythms. It's a terrible mistake.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Jean Oppenheimer
    A genuinely affecting movie that approaches its adult themes with intelligence, maturity, and rare authenticity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Jean Oppenheimer
    On one level it is highly intimate, yet it is also universal, a modern metaphor for the human condition and the precariousness of life itself.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Jean Oppenheimer
    The real star of the film is the food, which is sliced, diced, shredded, rolled, sautéed and fricasseed to mouthwatering perfection.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jean Oppenheimer
    If Campion has a message in all this -- something about the eternal battle of the sexes -- it is far from clear.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jean Oppenheimer
    The movie lacks the adult humor of such kid flicks as "Shrek" and "Lilo & Stitch," but the target audience at an advance screening was shrieking with joy throughout.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Sails by on cute dialogue, some funny visual gags, and two enormously likable leads.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jean Oppenheimer
    Despite the idealized portrait of Kelly and the very predictable plot, the film proves engaging, thanks in large measure to Ledger's sympathetic and believable performance.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 20 Jean Oppenheimer
    The predominantly amateur cast is painful to watch, so stilted and unconvincing are the performances. Poor Roth has nobody to play against and flounders in trying to keep the ship upright. Herzog aims for a kind of operatic sweep that he fails to achieve.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jean Oppenheimer
    Although far superior to recent American fare such as "Alex and Emma," the film takes actors with quirky charms and places them in a homogenized, studiolike picture. What a waste.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Jean Oppenheimer
    The film was shot with six cameras simultaneously and the images are projected on six split screens, à la Mike Figgis' "Time Code." While the subject's appeal is limited and the film's 106-minute running time excessive, viewers who do respond to the pic will find it raw, real and cathartic.