Jeannette Catsoulis
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For 1,004 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 3, 2, 1... Frankie Go Boom
Lowest review score: 0 The Abduction of Zack Butterfield
Score distribution:
1,004 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    By ignoring Israeli voices and focusing only on the immigrants, Mr. Haar has produced a documentary filled with immediacy but free of analysis, a fascinating but ultimately unenlightening record of their plight.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Knowing but never jaded, Hollywood Dreams is driven by Ms. Frederick's no-boundaries commitment to her broken character, a performance that's as startling as it is touching. In Mr. Jaglom's maverick hands, the appeal of illusion over reality is both fatal and irresistible.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Poking the bear of repression has consequences beyond Mr. Zahedi's immediate artistic goals, as this layered, intermittently fascinating documentary makes abundantly clear.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Messy in parts and at least 15 minutes too long, Personal Tailor is also cunningly acted and lushly photographed (by Zhao Xiaoshi) in dazzling candy-bright colors.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The actors are so relaxed and personable that the film’s occasional glibness — and its over-reliance on coincidence to further the cross-pollinating narrative — is easy to let slide.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unearthing a decent sample of these former members, as well as a wealth of archival film and photographs, the directors elicit testimony that’s diversely sharp, spacey, nostalgic and heartbreaking.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What could have been a very funny short film about self-control and befriending your id instead becomes a rambling commentary on father-son dysfunction and the limits of proctology.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This weirdly engaging tale of banking and bad behavior makes 19th-century China look uncomfortably like 21st-century America.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A little wan but a lot likable, Gustavo Ron’s Ways to Live Forever is a forthright and surprisingly buoyant drama about facing death before you have really lived.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Good Dick surmounts its indie-movie quirkiness with exceptional acting and a sincere belief in the salvation of its wounded characters.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Simon Dennis’s photography is glossy and crisp, and a lengthy foot chase — making excellent use of the National Gallery — is inventively choreographed. And if the villains are little more than fireplugs in balaclavas, the violence they provoke is satisfyingly vicious.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The shocks are short and sharp, the acting is strongest where it counts, and the director of photography, Adam Marsden, washes everything in a swampy green that makes spooks pop.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Driven less by civic duty than by the need to escape his dreary life, Zebraman is a tragic, touching figure too often obscured by Kankurou Kudo’s hyperactive screenplay and a special-effects team drunk on alien slime.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfolding like a medieval horror movie, Delta is sometimes laughable but often admirable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An oddly sterile documentary inspired by a particularly fecund imagination, American: The Bill Hicks Story recounts a bright-burning life while leaving us mostly in the dark.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Little more than a showcase for Mr. Quint - whose acting is almost as toneless as his playing is sublime - this trite, sunny drama pins lengthy musical interludes onto the flimsiest of narratives and hopes for the best.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Little Bedroom is a gentle, melancholy drama so pale and tentative that its very colors appear washed away by grief.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This brisk reimagining of the 1984 slasher "Silent Night, Deadly Night" delivers the seasonal goods with admirable efficiency and not a little wit.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film leans almost exclusively on the focused performances of its two leads, who create a credibly barbed chemistry that goes a long way toward distracting us from the film's low-budget deficiencies.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Maintaining a sunny, scrubbed-clean tone, Ms. Hencken allows no possibility of dazed groupies or drunken meltdowns — and only the briefest whiff of cocaine — to darken her portrait.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though clearly aimed at teenagers, this unashamedly heartstruck movie is neither obsessed with sex nor driven to humiliate its characters. Compared to those of the average American teen movie, its ambitions are so innocent they’re almost childlike.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Augmented by a trove of archival footage reaching back to the 1930s, Jesse Feldman's buoyant cinematography merges political history and sports mania into a triumphant timeline.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If the twisty finale underwhelms, Mr. Carreté’s enigmatic style and textured images offer their own doomy rewards.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The violence is quick and occasionally inventive, with little of the attenuated nastiness that characterizes so many genre pictures, and the photography ranges from brightly sun-kissed to down-and-dirty.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This crude, rowdy movie is also unexpectedly touching in its embrace of surfing as an escape from the stigma of poverty and broken homes. Escape from Russell Crowe’s droning narration, however, is impossible.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    That it eventually - if barely - succeeds is due more to the resilience of its actors than to the discipline of its makers.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Roger Spottiswoode directs with old-fashioned style, avoiding the saccharine with realistic depictions of a war-ravaged China (where he filmed) and a cast well versed in stiff-upper-lip.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Goldthwait exercises so much caution that you want to get behind his characters and push.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It may leave many bases uncovered (a section on groundbreaking European legislation is inadequately explained), but it will also leave you looking a lot more closely at what you put on your skin, in your mouth and underneath your sink.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mixes method and madness to chart the evolution of a counterculture phenomenon.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It’s all a little silly, but Mr. Mickle’s restrained gravity stifles the impulse to laugh.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Much like its subject: affable, quotable and emotionally guarded in the extreme.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ms. Howe is frequently riveting: a scene in which she repeatedly, and with waxing abuse, drunk-calls her former husband (an excellent Keith Allen) may make more than a few viewers squirm in recognition.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Kaufman’s talent can be debated, but his love for his job is stamped on every garish, oozy frame.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s loose naturalism and strong acting — Chris Browning, as a liaison between the F.B.I. and the reservation, is especially enjoyable — are slyly seductive.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    To the informed consumer hoping for greater elucidation, Mr. Seifert’s partisan, oversimplified survey falls short.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Employing scaled-down sets and low-budget audacity, Mr. Parker, an intelligent and boundary-testing filmmaker, proves less concerned with logic than with how far he can push his characters.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie’s stunning underwater photography (fearlessly captured by Mr. Ravetch) effectively dilutes the saccharine tone.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Imaginatively filmed by Peter Sova, Push has a dizzying, chaotic energy that pulls you along. Paul McGuigan directs with maximum efficiency and minimum use of computers, creating effects that feel satisfyingly tangible.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Evincing more visible intelligence than any of his human co-stars aside from Lithgow, Caesar is disquietingly lifelike.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A familiar underdog story told with unusual sensitivity.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An eagerly prurient dip into the sex-trafficking trough, Trade teeters between earnest exposé and salacious melodrama. Minus the film’s near-visible weight of conscience, success in the second category would have been virtually guaranteed.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though leaning too heavily on period tunes and the templates of Mr. Linklater and John Hughes (to whom the film is dedicated), Mr. Burns has a distinctly spacious style that gives female characters room to breathe.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Probes class consciousness with rather more sensitivity than originality.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Horizons are expanded and exoticism explored in Wah Do Dem, a shaggy road movie about relinquishing your comforts to find your bliss.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Hysteria, a disappointingly limp ode to the invention of the vibrator, plays like a Merchant Ivory Production of "Portnoy's Complaint."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite on-point performances (especially from the hilarious Mr. Wodianka), the story (by Tomasz Thomson, who also directs) is too pitted with holes and loose ends to permit the film a bump from meh to marvelous.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though speckled here and there with uneasy comedy, Toll Booth is a psychological pressure cooker that could blow its lid at any moment.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Documenting the vigorous strategies employed by the Dole Food Company to block the release of his 2009 film "Bananas!" - about a lawsuit brought by Nicaraguan workers who suspected the company's use of dangerous pesticides - the Swedish filmmaker Fredrik Gertten gains traction by taking the high road.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A laudable if lightweight argument for broader minds and thicker skins.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cheerless and voyeuristic, Clip (which was banned in Russia) seems a sincere attempt to portray a lost and disaffected generation. But the film’s brutally honest parade of callous behavior and casual, almost cruel sex has a depressing prurience that wears you down.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fetishizing the tired tokens of the American gangster movie, The Connection is a slickly styled, overlong pastiche. Yet its denizens have a retro glamour and the soundtrack a shameless literalness that’s rather endearing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Vividly depicting the indignities of the flesh, Porfirio offers a harshly sensual portrait of a man imprisoned by paralysis and the callousness of the state.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    These drifting, unresolved stories may lack dramatic punch, but Mr. Nikolic, who teaches film at the New School, draws lovely performances from his cosmopolitan cast and oodles of atmosphere from a spare piano-and-strings soundtrack.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In images veering from literal to cryptic to surreal, the movie presents a society where the weak are exploited and the vulnerable unprotected.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A pensive valentine to literacy programs and childhood idealism left in the ashes of broken families and an economically bifurcated society.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lads & Jockeys conveys first-race terrors and last-place humiliation with indulgent thoroughness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Somehow the happy screams of children whirling above a neutered reactor sound a lot less comforting than they should.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Before our eyes, Laura’s lengthening limbs and deepening introspection become the point of a movie that begins with a child and ends with a young woman.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This fairly rote tale of rural ghouls and their passing-through prey has its own hick charm, mostly because of performers who never overplay their hands.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Matty Beckerman’s Alien Abduction repackages ancient legend for modern audiences in a found-footage story of streamlined efficiency.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The approach is cheerfully candid and the humor often sly... Yet this midlife confessional could have reached beyond the maternal cravings of highly educated, urban-dwelling singletons had it plumbed people’s heads as thoroughly as Ms. Davenport’s birth canal.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Splinterheads gains traction from an eclectic cast that knows how to work a line.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Reveling in the vivid Bangkok locations, Geoff Boyle’s photography is crisp and bright, and Dion Lam’s action choreography unusually witty.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Nick might usurp most of the screen time, but it’s Mr. Del Toro, face flickering from benevolent to vicious and body heaving with literal and symbolic weight, who seizes the film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Marveling without questioning, the movie is content to package the phenomenon and coast on its feel-good wave. Yet, somewhere around the midpoint, I began to wonder who was most thrilled by all this fuss.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In stark contrast to their furry, blundering star, the makers of Paddington have colored so carefully inside the lines that any possibility of surprise or subversion is effectively throttled.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though leaving us with many more questions than answers, this well-intentioned blur of accusations, advertising clips and pink-washed events nevertheless deserves to be seen.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Harnessing the twin virtues of drollness and economy, Mr. Tully keeps scenes brief and melodrama on the margins.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    P2
    Swift and stealthy P2 is a canny exploitation of one of the urban woman’s greatest fears: the after-hours parking garage. Throw in a car that won’t start, a creepy security guard and a filmmaking team with perfect synchronicity, and the result is a minimalist nightmare.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie's lack of subtlety is countered by an unswerving commitment to impartiality.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Harks back to the drive-in classics of yesteryear with unapologetic nostalgia and undisguised affection.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    That stink, like iffy contracts and child labor laws, remains unexplored. Filled with blind eyes and unspoken agreements, Girl Model opens a can of worms, then disdains to follow their slimy trails.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Filming over four years and tracking several cases, the Brazilian director Jorge W. Atalla favors a fevered shooting style that's repetitious and disorienting but also effortlessly dramatic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The plot favors simplicity over rationality with a cheerful insouciance that’s hard to dislike.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As guileless and eager as the most avid fan, Gunnin’ is neither cautionary nor analytical, allowing its insights to occur organically and without fancy camera moves.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This witty first feature is a flawed but diverting meditation on finding inspiration while losing your soul.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Female-empowerment fantasy or just plain prurience, "Grave" is extremely efficient grindhouse. If there is any message here at all, it's don't mess with a novelist: being creative is her job.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    There may be little to give you the collywobbles, but there’s quite a lot to enjoy, with Ms. Morton heading the list. Swaddled in thick cardis and shapeless scrubs, she makes Katherine a well of overanxious care and castrating comments.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Letters transforms a picture-postcard location and odd-couple narrative into a pretty, and pretty predictable, snooze. Yet the acting is flawless, the tone gentle and observational, and Leila's transformation, when it occurs, is unforced and unaccompanied by pious lecturing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Kim Chapiron, proves an excellent choreographer of brutality...But without a strong political point (unlike its source material), Dog Pound feels hollow and hopeless.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sharp yet overdetermined, Blumenthal doesn’t breathe naturally — it’s a comedy in a box. Just not a box that everyone will want to open.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The story is unremarkable, but its execution zings.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Part rockumentary, part howl of outrage, Screamers would have benefited from less concert film and more historical background.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A strange synergy of old and new, My Bloody Valentine 3D blends cutting-edge technology and old-school prosthetics to produce something both familiar and alien: gore you can believe in.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Drawing much of its energy from an eclectic and fully integrated soundtrack, Skills Like This gazes indulgently on 20-something aimlessness and the comfort of assigned roles. In Mr. Miranda's hands sloth can be more appealing than you might think.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Low-key and low-tech, Lunch coasts on the earned wisdom of pros who know how to work a room. Right up to the arrival of their separate checks.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the enjoyable prickliness of the film's early scenes soon dissolves into cozy solutions, a sturdy supporting cast - even Ron Leibman's scenery-chewing turn as Laura's blowhard father is more amusing than annoying - balances the scales.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    One part hagiography and two parts psychotherapy. Together they showcase a talent both formidable and erratic, its bright and shining peaks sliding inexplicably into valleys of disaster.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Trying to gather too much into his net, Mr. Stewart gets a little lost, but his bottom line could not be clearer: When the oceans die, so do we.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A granola ode to natural childbirth that makes you want to hop into a tub of warm water and start pushing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This disorienting, dippy documentary makes one thing abundantly clear: for the Hubers, the toughest climb may be into their own heads.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The template is familiar, but Quarantine delivers the heebie-jeebies with solid acting and perfectly calibrated shocks.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This setup is simple, but what follows is less so: an impressionistic battle between imagination and brute force that too often veers from enlightening to exasperating.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is so out there that you can imagine Mr. Smith and his collaborators rolling in the aisles at their own preposterousness. If you can find your inner 16-year-old, you might just join them.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Encouraging sensitive performances that mitigate the film’s sluggish pace and fuzzy narrative, Ms. Szumowska juxtaposes two-person scenes of wordless intimacy with group expressions of casual violence.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It's the film's geometrists who enthrall most, revealing that many of the shapes - one of which famously made the cover of a 1990 Led Zeppelin album - hold entirely new answers to Euclidean problems.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The role played by her camera in exacerbating Avery’s natural, adolescent self-absorption continues to nag; in the end, I was less concerned for the wildly indulged Avery -- whose own narration reveals a charismatic and extremely fortunate young woman -- than for the hearts breaking around her.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As sun-dappled infatuation abruptly crashes into post-apocalyptic survival, Mr. Macdonald struggles to balance a nebulous narrative on tentpole moments of rich emotional resonance.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Automatons is driven less by its hints of suicide bombers than by its rigorous adherence to a time when robots were played by inverted dustbins and battles were represented by dots converging on a crackling screen. This lack of sophistication is enormously endearing, leaving us with the comforting notion that the end of the world will look a lot like the beginning of television.

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