Jeannette Catsoulis
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For 989 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Virunga
Lowest review score: 0 The Tiger and the Snow
Score distribution:
989 movie reviews
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Showcasing the best and the worst in human nature, Orlando von Einsiedel’s devastating documentary “Virunga” wrenches a startlingly lucid narrative from a sickening web of bribery, corruption and violence.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A fascinating study of a man, and a firm, deeply changed by catastrophe.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Girls in the Band is everything a worthwhile documentary should be, and then some: engaging, informative, thorough and brimming with delightful characters.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Dropping us into a perfect storm of avarice, this cool and incisive snapshot of global capitalism at work is as remarkable for its access as for its refusal to judge.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A blue-collar meditation on the meaning of community and the imperative of compassion, one that endures even as an unexpectedly prurient drama unfolds at its center.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like a Ken Loach drama stripped to bare bones, The Arbor springs to life in the bright bitterness of Dunbar's prose, showcased in alfresco performances of contentious scenes from the play.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Remarkable as much for its speculative restraint as for its philosophical reach.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Remarkable patchwork of unremarkable lives.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Coming in at a tight 75 minutes, this strikingly original travelogue glides on the lovely lilt of Mr. Santos's Portuguese narration.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Kid With a Bike feels as vulnerable as Cyril's unformed character. Within its tight 87 minutes, not a lot happens, unless you count the saving of a life.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With marvelous discipline, Mr. Shapiro crams a wealth of material into a tight 77 minutes, smoothly communicating the group effort required to achieve the perfect shot.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Its violence is low-tech... and its look is old-school, but its message could not possibly be more momentous.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Gentle on the eyes but stirring to the mind, What Now? Remind Me is an extraordinary, almost indescribably personal reflection on life, love, suffering and impermanence.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With its whispery conversations, sepulchral atmosphere and soothing play of light and shadow, Cave of Forgotten Dreams is probably best enjoyed in a chemically enhanced state of mind.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Frequently moving and quietly enlightening, Last Train Home is about love and exploitation, sacrifice and endurance.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Something unexpectedly profound emerges from the flimsiest of stories in Stranger Things, a drama so modest and trusting of its two leads that any directing flourishes might have shattered its spell.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Exit could be a new subgenre: the prankumentary. Audiences, however, would be advised simply to enjoy the film on its face -- even if that face is a carefully contrived mask.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Song of the Sea moves delicately but purposefully from pain to contentment and from anger to love. On land and underwater, the siblings’ adventures unfold in hand-drawn, painterly frames of misty pastels, sometimes encircled by cobwebby borders that give them the look of pictures in a locket.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cool-headed, lighthearted and outrageously entertaining.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Visually distinctive and aurally delightful, "Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench" has style to burn. A soulful black-and-white commentary on love, art and their competing demands, this Boston-based musical from Damien Chazelle floats on a wave of spontaneity and charm.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Looper, a cocky sci-fi tale with more brass than substance, is rife with these "Say what?" moments.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Engrossing, poetic and often very funny, "Position," like its predecessors, uses the lens of a single family to view the tumult of an entire country.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like the director's cover story, the movie is a Trojan horse: an exceptionally well-made documentary that unfolds like a spy thriller, complete with bugged hotel rooms, clandestine derring-do and mysterious men in gray flannel suits.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    There’s a stillness to the filmmaking, coupled with Saunder Jurriaans and David Bensi’s truly lovely original score, that lends specific shots... a near-heartbreaking melancholy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unapologetically designed both to inform and affect, Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s delicately lacerating documentary, Blackfish, uses the tragic tale of a single whale and his human victims as the backbone of a hypercritical investigation into the marine-park giant SeaWorld Entertainment.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Four years in the making, Marwencol emerges as a number of things: an absorbing portrait of an outsider artist; a fascinating journey from near-death to active life; a meditation on the brain's ability to forge new pathways when old ones have been destroyed.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Drag Me to Hell has a tonic playfulness that’s unabashedly retro, an indulgent return to Mr. Raimi’s goofy, gooey roots.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A film that begins as a family quest but evolves into a gripping study of know-don't-tell reticence and the umbilical tie of a lost homeland.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Propriety and recklessness make for uneasy bedfellows in The Deep Blue Sea, a shimmering exploration of romantic obsession and the tension between fitting in and flying free.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    [A] sneakily compelling documentary.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Big Words is an engrossing, coming-of-middle-age drama that shows how disappointment can fester and derail a life. By the end, hope and change seem possible but far from guaranteed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As its brilliantly choreographed -- and appropriately modest -- climax proves, given the right ingredients, even the simplest story can leave you gasping.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Requiem is a moving study of a tortured young woman more at peace with medieval ritual than with modern medicine.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    His film opens with a lullaby, and while there is indeed something soothing in his images of repetitive, backbreaking toil, the music also serves as a reminder of childhood lost.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfolding in simple yet wonderfully expressive hand-drawn frames, the film’s unsparingly observant plot depicts the slide into senility with empathy and imagination.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Buoyed by a fully integrated soundtrack, Kati With an I delivers a lovingly personal observation of young people at a crossroads. The film's sound is not always crisp, but no matter: Kati's story is written in every vital, vérité frame.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Working with grace and patience, Mr. Fernández makes the mundane captivating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Red White & Blue proves the director a bona fide storyteller with more tools in his arsenal than shock and awe.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    By introducing funky licks, fancy footwork and many of his own compositions to the band's stodgy set list of jazz standards, this indomitable leader (whose declining health adds a poignant twang to the film's final scenes) instilled racial pride alongside musical competency.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Astonishingly, this is neither as depressing nor as arm-twistingly uplifting as you might expect. Mr. DaSilva’s experience behind a camera shows in his brisk pacing, clear narrative structure and the awareness that a story of sickness needs lighthearted distractions.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ms. Scherson’s style — backed wholeheartedly by the cool cinematography of Ricardo de Angelis — may value mood over information, but it’s the perfect vehicle for a portrait of two damaged souls grasping for a security they no longer possess.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Art house meets grind house in Cargo 200, Alexey Balabanov’s morbidly compelling thriller set in the Soviet Union.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    But instead of a dignified stroll down genealogy lane, Mr. Solnicki has made a sparking, gossipy soap opera that’s riddled with emotion and stuffed with strong characters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    At its best, The Fighter takes on the chasm between televised boxing and its mostly working-class, aspirational origins with grit and intelligence.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cheerfully partial and unapologetically deferential to its subject’s operatic self-promotion, Jodorowsky’s Dune makes you wish that he had scraped together the final $5 million needed, we are told, to realize his dream.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite its immersion in tragedy and decline, So Much So Fast is leavened by unexpected humor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Patiently photographed by Carlos Vásquez, who bestows the same gentle attention on grainy snapshots and the beautifully ruined face of an aging drag queen, 108 peels back layers of delusion and dishonesty.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Love is a mournful thriller about the myth of assimilation and the way nurture - or, more precisely, the lack of it - fashions identity and character. Elegantly directed by Vladan Nikolic using multiple viewpoints and an elliptical, nonlinear narrative, the movie presents a New World disrupted by old grievances and a neglected community living by its own rules.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 65 Jeannette Catsoulis
    For all its dazzling allure, Darren Aronofsky's Black Swan, a feverishly psycho thriller set in the hermetic world of classical ballet, proves a meaningless exercise in Grand Guignol exhibitionism.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Discrimination against nomadic populations is hardly restricted to Romania, but the integration of that country's largest ethnic minority seems particularly pressing. If only that view were shared by the Romanian adults on screen, most of whom display a shocking degree of prejudice.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It's potent stuff, delving into pornography, incest, murder and mutilation in the company of alienated men and unhappy, sometimes cruel women.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A singularly focused and avant-garde talent, Ms. Streb bends the messy rush of risk to her indomitable will.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A slight yet profound exploration of generational choices and our fear of living our parents’ lives.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offers one man's extraordinary life as a gateway to a larger history of tragedy and transition. It's an unflinching account of what farming takes -- and, more important, what it gives back.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Using de Chabannes as the film's conscience and moral fulcrum, Tavernier - just as he did in his 1996 film "Captain Conan" - exposes the shame of a meaningless war and the psychological damage borne by those fighting it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Warmhearted and defiantly unsentimental, Grandma, a Thousand Times gains lightness from Teta's tart observations.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Illustrating the film's rags-to-ring narrative with panoramic mountain views and compact shots of young bodies punching their way up the food chain, Mr. Sun straddles ancient and modern, tranquillity and turmoil, with equal sureness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In stark contrast to their furry, blundering star, the makers of Paddington have colored so carefully inside the lines that any possibility of surprise or subversion is effectively throttled.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The tone is breezy, bright and brash, vividly illuminated by Ms. Juri’s extraordinarily unprotected and utterly fearless performance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The very definition of modest, Las Acacias articulates emotional transformation with simplicity and grace. Rarely has a film managed to say so much while saying so little.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Stingy with details and dialogue, but more than generous with atmosphere, this seductively photographed thriller (written and directed by Jeremy Saulnier, who also wielded the camera) sells its empty calories with great skill.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    One of the most entertaining documentaries to appear since "Exit Through the Gift Shop," a film similarly obsessed with role playing and deception.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A searing look at the role of American evangelical missionaries in the persecution of gay Africans, Roger Ross Williams’s God Loves Uganda approaches this intersection of faith and politics with some fairness and a good deal of outrage.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Circo offers a touching chronicle of a dying culture harnessed to ambitions that remain very much alive.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Michael Brown (a renowned mountaineer), digs below the adventure itself to reveal the gaping holes in our veteran care. Doing so, he translates a collage of experiences - some desperate, some hopeful, all tragic - into a first-person commentary on the malign reverberations of war.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Slicing through the fat of policy debates to the visceral rush of critical care, the narrative combines existential worries... and blood-and-guts immediacy with a seamlessness that made me want to high-five the editor, Joshua Altman.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Naturalistic and mysterious, Nana is terrifyingly dependent on its diminutive star. Insisting on neither written lines nor predetermined actions (the film's short script was used primarily to obtain financing), Ms. Massadian, who worked with the child for almost two years, has coaxed a performance of remarkable lucidity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It’s a brutally unsympathetic portrait of situational anxiety that withholds comfort from Paul and viewer alike, and Mr. Semans refuses to relent.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Bathed in the flamingo colors and Caribbean rhythms of its location, this deeply personal debut from the writer and director Mariette Monpierre develops with a lingering attention to sensation and sound.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Silent Souls is part folk tale, part lesson in letting go. In its quiet acceptance of the passing of time, this unusual film reminds us that to die is not always the same as to disappear.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Raising significant questions about the psychological effects of poverty on young children, this unsettlingly direct stab at atonement feels genuine.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A mood poem to summer loving and sexual awakening, It Felt Like Love powerfully evokes a time when flesh is paramount, and peer behavior is the standard by which we judge our own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smartly incorporating Sasa Zivkovic’s sweet and simple animation, as well as an exhilarating, punk-infused soundtrack, Mr. Persiel extends the film’s appeal beyond hard-core skaters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Turkish-German filmmaker Fatih Akin isn't exactly known for slapstick, so Soul Kitchen has the feel of a palate cleanser. After the hard-edged drama of "Head-On" and "The Edge of Heaven," this boisterous comedy milling with scruffy misfits goes down more easily than an oyster on the half shell.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The best concert films achieve a marriage of sound and image that feels effortlessly harmonious, and in that regard Inni, a musical portrait of the Icelandic band Sigur Ros, leaves most of its genre in the dust.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An affectionate, rollicking guide to the drive-in classics of Australian filmmaking from the 1970s and ’80s.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Directors Justin Weinstein and Tyler Measom have produced a jaunty, jovial portrait with a surprising sting in its tail.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s small group of primary characters slips from joy to fury to murderous suspicion with faultless fluidity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Carefully assembled and soberly presented, Robert May’s Kids for Cash takes a lacerating look at America’s juvenile justice system.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging the sacred and the profane, the bloody and the batty, Love Exposure tunnels into serious topics - warped parenting, sexual intolerance and the way religious cults enslave damaged souls - with a hilariously blasphemous shovel.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This challenging and mesmerizing documentary captures horror and joy with the same gorgeous dispassion.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Soft in tone and muted in color, Waiting for August is a child’s-eye view of one family — among many in today’s Romanian economy — rising to the challenge of living without parents.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Hectic and harebrained, this galloping French thriller tosses a potpourri of plot points - crooked cops, sleazy gangsters, stolen drugs and an underage hostage - into a packed-to-the-gills nightclub, and stirs. Repeatedly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This fabulously inventive debut feature, written and directed by the British comedian Joe Cornish, never flags.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s guileless, heartfelt style veers perilously close to corniness at times, but the superb cast dares you to mock.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Matching her subject’s lackadaisical rhythms, Ms. Huber has shaped an unusually poetic biopic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The wonder of Black's performance here is its empathy and balance: inasmuch as he can disappear into any role, he dissolves into this one with no hint of mocking remove. It's a beautiful thing to see.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The filmmakers work tirelessly to parallel their undersea world with the larger universe, offering genteel reminders of our mutual dependence.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A movie of stark contrasts and zigzagging motives, Beauty in Trouble moves from the golden serenity of a Tuscan villa to the powdery chaos of a Czech garage without sacrificing thematic confidence or nuanced performances.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even while embracing the breathless beats of the crime thriller, Graceland holds tight to its concern for exploited children.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This weird and witty spoof filters the routines of the living through the lens of the long dead.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Presenting neither an argument for medication nor its rejection, Billy the Kid is a deceptively simple portrait of a shockingly self-aware and articulate young man.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lively, swift, vibrantly colorful and for the most part wonderfully acted, the film is slyly aware of the daytime talk show as a vehicle for women's concerns.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A tale of two siblings -- one basking in memories, the other fleeing them -- Prodigal Sons grapples with identity through the prism of sibling rivalry. In the end its conclusions have little to do with gender and everything to do with acceptance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film presents an often sharp commentary on dueling beliefs and idiocies that unfolds in lush pastel hues and distinctively retro drawings.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Vividly depicting the indignities of the flesh, Porfirio offers a harshly sensual portrait of a man imprisoned by paralysis and the callousness of the state.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What follows is something rarely seen in American movies: a sincerely humane examination of what it means to experience a crisis of faith. Tender, bittersweet and often gently comedic, Corinne's 20-year journey toward (and around, and away from) her God has a loose, searching rhythm that's engrossingly unpredictable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The trick to enjoying The Town, Ben Affleck's follow-up to his impressive 2007 directing debut, "Gone, Baby, Gone," is to expect nothing but pulpy entertainment.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Consistently smart and delicate as a spider web, Bridge to Terabithia is the kind of children’s movie rarely seen nowadays. And at a time when many public schools are being forced to cut music and art from the curriculum, the story’s insistence on the healing power of a nurtured imagination is both welcome and essential.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging the sustainability worries of guitar enthusiasts and environmentalists with the hard-cash concerns of logging corporations and Native American land developers, Maxine Trump’s thoughtful documentary wrests clarity from complexity.

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