Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,016 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Big Men
Lowest review score: 0 Vice
Score distribution:
1,016 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Brilliant, bizarre, dazzling and utterly demented, The Last Circus views Franco-era Spain through the crazed eyes of two clowns doing battle for the love of one magnificent woman.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    By introducing funky licks, fancy footwork and many of his own compositions to the band's stodgy set list of jazz standards, this indomitable leader (whose declining health adds a poignant twang to the film's final scenes) instilled racial pride alongside musical competency.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A vibrantly vulgar comedy that never hangs around to admire its own cleverness.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With marvelous discipline, Mr. Shapiro crams a wealth of material into a tight 77 minutes, smoothly communicating the group effort required to achieve the perfect shot.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Bathed in the flamingo colors and Caribbean rhythms of its location, this deeply personal debut from the writer and director Mariette Monpierre develops with a lingering attention to sensation and sound.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Three Sisters documents extreme poverty in rural China with the compassionate eye and inexhaustible patience of a director whose curiosity about his country’s unfortunates never seems to wane.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Girls in the Band is everything a worthwhile documentary should be, and then some: engaging, informative, thorough and brimming with delightful characters.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Morally cunning and with a tone as black as pitch, Pieta, the 18th film from the South Korean director Kim Ki-duk, is a deeply unnerving revenge movie in which redemption is dangled like a cat toy before a cougar.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A fascinating study of a man, and a firm, deeply changed by catastrophe.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Remarkable as much for its insights as for its audacity, The Dirties approaches school violence with a comic veneer that slowly shades into deep darkness.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Dropping us into a perfect storm of avarice, this cool and incisive snapshot of global capitalism at work is as remarkable for its access as for its refusal to judge.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Gentle on the eyes but stirring to the mind, What Now? Remind Me is an extraordinary, almost indescribably personal reflection on life, love, suffering and impermanence.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Showcasing the best and the worst in human nature, Orlando von Einsiedel’s devastating documentary “Virunga” wrenches a startlingly lucid narrative from a sickening web of bribery, corruption and violence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Maintaining a strict formal allegiance to reserve and restraint, [Mr. Zobel] shapes a dreamily elegant emotional ballet from glances and gestures and subtle shifts in power.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Love is a mournful thriller about the myth of assimilation and the way nurture - or, more precisely, the lack of it - fashions identity and character. Elegantly directed by Vladan Nikolic using multiple viewpoints and an elliptical, nonlinear narrative, the movie presents a New World disrupted by old grievances and a neglected community living by its own rules.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Featuring exceptional people doing extraordinary things, Blindsight is one of those documentaries with the power to make you re-examine your entire life -- or at least get off the couch.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This is no splatter movie: spare, suspenseful and brilliantly invested in silence, Bryan Bertino's debut feature unfolds in a slow crescendo of intimidation.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cool-headed, lighthearted and outrageously entertaining.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Exquisitely captured in natural light by the cinematographer Alexis Zabé, Juan’s journey is framed by sherbet-colored houses and lemon sidewalks, dipping palm fronds and a burnished, turquoise horizon. The director calls his style "artisan cinema"; I just call it dreamy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like the director's cover story, the movie is a Trojan horse: an exceptionally well-made documentary that unfolds like a spy thriller, complete with bugged hotel rooms, clandestine derring-do and mysterious men in gray flannel suits.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This strikingly humane film may function as a prequel to Animal Planet’s “Whale Wars” but is light years ahead in visual clarity and narrative ambition.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Epic in scope but intimate in theme, The Warlordsheaves with spectacular battles and the relentless sway of self-interest over conscience.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Educates without lecturing and engages without effort.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Exit could be a new subgenre: the prankumentary. Audiences, however, would be advised simply to enjoy the film on its face -- even if that face is a carefully contrived mask.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Remarkable patchwork of unremarkable lives.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Strongly acted and beautifully photographed (by Virgil Mirano), Spoken Word is a quietly resonant family drama about the tug of old habits and the difficulties of escaping the past.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sweet, generous and tonally sure, Patrik, Age 1.5 has a nostalgic feel, and not just because of a soundtrack skewed toward last-millennium tunes and a hyperreal suburban setting lifted straight from "Pleasantville."
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A creative tour de force, an intellectual high-wire act as astonishing as it is entertaining.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Remarkable as much for its speculative restraint as for its philosophical reach.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Four years in the making, Marwencol emerges as a number of things: an absorbing portrait of an outsider artist; a fascinating journey from near-death to active life; a meditation on the brain's ability to forge new pathways when old ones have been destroyed.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The focus of this bizarre Finnish fairy tale - as black as anything the Brothers Grimm could have dreamed up - is a sinister old codger who chews off ears and whose demon minion kidnaps innocent children. Ho ho no!
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like the best westerns, Red Hill is a stripped-down morality tale; like the best horror movies, its true monsters remain cloaked until the final reel.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The filmmaking is rough and rather clumsy, but by ceding the floor to his open, highly articulate sisters, Mr. Colvard has created a fascinatingly raw study of ferociously wielded male power.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Visually distinctive and aurally delightful, "Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench" has style to burn. A soulful black-and-white commentary on love, art and their competing demands, this Boston-based musical from Damien Chazelle floats on a wave of spontaneity and charm.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Beautiful in its minimalism, Nénette is no antizoo rant but a melancholy meditation on captivity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though filming his hulking hero off and on for nine long years, he (Levy) has created a work that feels remarkably out of time, a snapshot of a man - and a relationship - running in circles.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smartly written and flawlessly acted, Lovers of Hate is a Trojan horse, the kind of movie that begins so self-effacingly that we don't expect any surprises.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Here, excessive piety and rampant paganism are equally malevolent forces, the film's baleful view of human nature mirrored in Sebastian Edschmid's swampy photography. As is emphasized in a nicely consistent coda, the Lord's side and the right side are not necessarily one and the same.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Circo offers a touching chronicle of a dying culture harnessed to ambitions that remain very much alive.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Buoyed by a fully integrated soundtrack, Kati With an I delivers a lovingly personal observation of young people at a crossroads. The film's sound is not always crisp, but no matter: Kati's story is written in every vital, vérité frame.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like a Ken Loach drama stripped to bare bones, The Arbor springs to life in the bright bitterness of Dunbar's prose, showcased in alfresco performances of contentious scenes from the play.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Red White & Blue proves the director a bona fide storyteller with more tools in his arsenal than shock and awe.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If Mr. Haney sometimes struggles to find focus, he has no trouble locating heroes, including the doggedly energetic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and a slew of stalwart locals and fearless outsiders. And the black heart of coal country - and, as the film shows, our national energy debate - has never seemed so in need of white knights.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Woven throughout is a deeply rewarding recognition of the sustaining power of female companionship.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Recording every success and setback, the wrenching documentary Crime After Crime favors the personal over the political, creating a no-frills portrait of a stoic and remarkably unembittered woman.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Nonetheless, the film's homespun quality (Ms. Canty, whose childlike voice provides intermittent narration, simply describes herself in the publicity notes as "the mom of four kids") works in its favor, as does its maker's agitated sincerity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Not one for climactic endings or predictable histrionics, the director, David Barker (who wrote the script with Ms. Meierhans and Mr. Godere), sticks to the stylistic template of his debut feature, "Afraid of Everything," which was filmed in 1999. Preferring the tease over the tell, his films coax us into looking beneath the surface. What we find is mostly up to us.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This fabulously inventive debut feature, written and directed by the British comedian Joe Cornish, never flags.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A deliciously warped wallow in misogyny, depravity and dead-eyed manipulation, Cold Fish charts the twisted alliance of two tropical-fish salesmen with baleful glee.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lively, swift, vibrantly colorful and for the most part wonderfully acted, the film is slyly aware of the daytime talk show as a vehicle for women's concerns.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging the sacred and the profane, the bloody and the batty, Love Exposure tunnels into serious topics - warped parenting, sexual intolerance and the way religious cults enslave damaged souls - with a hilariously blasphemous shovel.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Painfully stark yet utterly magnetic, You Don't Like the Truth: 4 Days Inside Guantánamo presents excerpts from the 2003 interrogation of the 16-year-old Omar Khadr, a Canadian citizen accused of killing an American soldier during a firefight in an Afghan village.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The best concert films achieve a marriage of sound and image that feels effortlessly harmonious, and in that regard Inni, a musical portrait of the Icelandic band Sigur Ros, leaves most of its genre in the dust.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An ingenious black comedy written and directed by James Westby, comes at you like a horror movie before settling down into something quieter but equally skin crawling.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Comprising small, near-perfect scenes played out largely at dinner tables and on couches, The Lie wonders if it's possible to rewrite lives and remake choices.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While occasionally unpleasant, the film never crosses the line from bearably chilling to unbearably gruesome, keeping its characters credible and its events explicable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Much better to focus on the tempestuous Mercutio (Hale Appleman, a standout), whose increasing volatility forms the perfect counterpoint to Mr. Doyle's beaming Juliet and Seth Numrich's sensitive Romeo. Punctuated by eerily static shots of empty basketball courts and deserted hallways, Mercutio's blustering menace is as timeless as the romance he seeks to derail.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Warmhearted and defiantly unsentimental, Grandma, a Thousand Times gains lightness from Teta's tart observations.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What emerges is a poignant commentary on the uneasy commingling of love and fame.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Snowtown Murders reminds us that sometimes evil is immediately recognizable, but at other times it comes bearing bacon and beer.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With its soft, bleached images and occasional detours into black-and-white stills, Turn Me On, set in an unspecified recent past, has a gentle oddness as unforced as its performances and as inoffensive as its dialogue.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It's potent stuff, delving into pornography, incest, murder and mutilation in the company of alienated men and unhappy, sometimes cruel women.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Bolstered by animated re-enactments and Bob Richman's frosty cinematography, Unraveled is a mesmerizing one-man dive into narcissism, entitlement and unchecked greed.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfolding in New England over four vibrantly represented seasons, "Feelings" is a small-scale wonder. Pivotal events play out in the spaces between scenes, leaving only emotional imprints that we interpret within a timeline that may not be entirely linear.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The dead are unquiet and the living are terrified in The Road, a powerfully atmospheric blend of ghostly encounters, horrific situations and missing-persons mysteries from the Philippine director Yam Laranas.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Crammed with color and imagination, every one of Jake Pollock's gorgeously photographed images feels timelessly suspended between innocence and awareness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A slow-motion punch to the groin. As such, it's fitting that one of our first sights is a large "NO" stenciled in the parking lot of a fast-food joint in suburban Ohio: as the film progresses, the word becomes a silent mantra for viewers who can't quite believe what they're seeing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ultimately his story draws more energy from class than from criminality: awash in sludgy browns and rotting greens - the colors of poverty and decomposition - this unpredictable oddity is a little bonkers but a lot original.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The very definition of modest, Las Acacias articulates emotional transformation with simplicity and grace. Rarely has a film managed to say so much while saying so little.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Woven together, these monologues of bereavement and confusion, illustrated with images so terrible they repel rational explanation, form a tapestry of human misery that's impossible to shake off.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A film that begins as a family quest but evolves into a gripping study of know-don't-tell reticence and the umbilical tie of a lost homeland.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Quiet, simple and soaked in sorrow, Hitler's Children takes a stripped-down approach to an emotionally sophisticated subject.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A wry, mournful study of midlife crisis.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Discrimination against nomadic populations is hardly restricted to Romania, but the integration of that country's largest ethnic minority seems particularly pressing. If only that view were shared by the Romanian adults on screen, most of whom display a shocking degree of prejudice.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Naturalistic and mysterious, Nana is terrifyingly dependent on its diminutive star. Insisting on neither written lines nor predetermined actions (the film's short script was used primarily to obtain financing), Ms. Massadian, who worked with the child for almost two years, has coaxed a performance of remarkable lucidity.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Gliding from intimate to surreal, from aurally disjunctive to visually seductive, Rubberband is a languorous ballad of sadness and disappointment.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Delicate and autobiographical (Wang Han was the director’s name when he was a child, and the story is constructed from his boyhood memories), 11 Flowers clings steadfastly to its youthful point of view.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Nuances of faith, politics and sexual identity enrich what initially presents as a classic good son-bad son tale.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Something unexpectedly profound emerges from the flimsiest of stories in Stranger Things, a drama so modest and trusting of its two leads that any directing flourishes might have shattered its spell.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the film’s ice-cold blend of the cerebral and the atavistic can be off-putting, it enables a queasy portrait of moral disengagement that lingers long after Simon has slipped from the screen.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smartly incorporating Sasa Zivkovic’s sweet and simple animation, as well as an exhilarating, punk-infused soundtrack, Mr. Persiel extends the film’s appeal beyond hard-core skaters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even while embracing the breathless beats of the crime thriller, Graceland holds tight to its concern for exploited children.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This confident first feature from the actor Amy Seimetz is much more invested in atmosphere than in plot.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A slight yet profound exploration of generational choices and our fear of living our parents’ lives.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It’s a brutally unsympathetic portrait of situational anxiety that withholds comfort from Paul and viewer alike, and Mr. Semans refuses to relent.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This pull-no-punches portrait shocks and amuses with equal frequency.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A big, beautiful, rambling immersion in a passion whose heat is fueled primarily by its impossibility.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The title of Terms and Conditions May Apply is unlikely to excite, but the content of this quietly blistering documentary should rile even the most passive viewer.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unapologetically designed both to inform and affect, Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s delicately lacerating documentary, Blackfish, uses the tragic tale of a single whale and his human victims as the backbone of a hypercritical investigation into the marine-park giant SeaWorld Entertainment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Big Words is an engrossing, coming-of-middle-age drama that shows how disappointment can fester and derail a life. By the end, hope and change seem possible but far from guaranteed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Banishing showy effects and cheap scares, the Ecuadorean director Sebastián Cordero has meticulously shaped a number of sci-fi clichés — from the botched spacewalk to the communications breakdown — into a wondering contemplation of our place in the universe.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ms. Scherson’s style — backed wholeheartedly by the cool cinematography of Ricardo de Angelis — may value mood over information, but it’s the perfect vehicle for a portrait of two damaged souls grasping for a security they no longer possess.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Matching her subject’s lackadaisical rhythms, Ms. Huber has shaped an unusually poetic biopic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Infused with an infectious love for its subject, Symphony of the Soil presents a wondrous world of critters and bacteria, mulch and manure.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Astonishingly, this is neither as depressing nor as arm-twistingly uplifting as you might expect. Mr. DaSilva’s experience behind a camera shows in his brisk pacing, clear narrative structure and the awareness that a story of sickness needs lighthearted distractions.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging the sustainability worries of guitar enthusiasts and environmentalists with the hard-cash concerns of logging corporations and Native American land developers, Maxine Trump’s thoughtful documentary wrests clarity from complexity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    But instead of a dignified stroll down genealogy lane, Mr. Solnicki has made a sparking, gossipy soap opera that’s riddled with emotion and stuffed with strong characters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Carefully assembled and soberly presented, Robert May’s Kids for Cash takes a lacerating look at America’s juvenile justice system.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A mood poem to summer loving and sexual awakening, It Felt Like Love powerfully evokes a time when flesh is paramount, and peer behavior is the standard by which we judge our own.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A tale of two brothers, one band and a boatload of psychological baggage, Mistaken for Strangers is, like its maker, scruffy, undisciplined and eager to be loved. The big surprise is how easy it is to comply.

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