Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,177 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Virunga
Lowest review score: 0 Oconomowoc
Score distribution:
1177 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though filming his hulking hero off and on for nine long years, he (Levy) has created a work that feels remarkably out of time, a snapshot of a man - and a relationship - running in circles.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Thanks to Ms. Haas’s truly remarkable lead performance (she was 16 at the time of filming) and Ms. Shalom-Ezer’s nuanced dialogue, Adar’s journey finally feels more like one of empowerment than victimization.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A film that begins as a family quest but evolves into a gripping study of know-don't-tell reticence and the umbilical tie of a lost homeland.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Four years in the making, Marwencol emerges as a number of things: an absorbing portrait of an outsider artist; a fascinating journey from near-death to active life; a meditation on the brain's ability to forge new pathways when old ones have been destroyed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the film’s ice-cold blend of the cerebral and the atavistic can be off-putting, it enables a queasy portrait of moral disengagement that lingers long after Simon has slipped from the screen.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A tale of two brothers, one band and a boatload of psychological baggage, Mistaken for Strangers is, like its maker, scruffy, undisciplined and eager to be loved. The big surprise is how easy it is to comply.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging the sacred and the profane, the bloody and the batty, Love Exposure tunnels into serious topics - warped parenting, sexual intolerance and the way religious cults enslave damaged souls - with a hilariously blasphemous shovel.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging the sustainability worries of guitar enthusiasts and environmentalists with the hard-cash concerns of logging corporations and Native American land developers, Maxine Trump’s thoughtful documentary wrests clarity from complexity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The filmmaking is rough and rather clumsy, but by ceding the floor to his open, highly articulate sisters, Mr. Colvard has created a fascinatingly raw study of ferociously wielded male power.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Curating a selection of the original interview recordings (whose sound quality is damn near pristine), Mr. Jones fashions an unfaltering encomium that’s entirely free of the highfalutin monologues that might deter noncinephiles.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This confident first feature from the actor Amy Seimetz is much more invested in atmosphere than in plot.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An ingenious black comedy written and directed by James Westby, comes at you like a horror movie before settling down into something quieter but equally skin crawling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A wry, mournful study of midlife crisis.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Exit could be a new subgenre: the prankumentary. Audiences, however, would be advised simply to enjoy the film on its face -- even if that face is a carefully contrived mask.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Comprising small, near-perfect scenes played out largely at dinner tables and on couches, The Lie wonders if it's possible to rewrite lives and remake choices.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Snowtown Murders reminds us that sometimes evil is immediately recognizable, but at other times it comes bearing bacon and beer.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With its soft, bleached images and occasional detours into black-and-white stills, Turn Me On, set in an unspecified recent past, has a gentle oddness as unforced as its performances and as inoffensive as its dialogue.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The tone is breezy, bright and brash, vividly illuminated by Ms. Juri’s extraordinarily unprotected and utterly fearless performance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Beautiful in its minimalism, Nénette is no antizoo rant but a melancholy meditation on captivity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Featuring exceptional people doing extraordinary things, Blindsight is one of those documentaries with the power to make you re-examine your entire life -- or at least get off the couch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Woven throughout is a deeply rewarding recognition of the sustaining power of female companionship.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Enveloped in a sweetness that buffers the depths of its emotions, Hiroyuki Okiura’s A Letter to Momo explores the stains of loss and regret on a personality too young to articulate them.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Circo offers a touching chronicle of a dying culture harnessed to ambitions that remain very much alive.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unapologetically designed both to inform and affect, Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s delicately lacerating documentary, Blackfish, uses the tragic tale of a single whale and his human victims as the backbone of a hypercritical investigation into the marine-park giant SeaWorld Entertainment.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A creative tour de force, an intellectual high-wire act as astonishing as it is entertaining.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The story’s seemingly clear notions of guilt on one side and grievance on the other are gradually nudged in unexpected directions.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This chilly tale of violent secrets and unvoiced misery relies heavily on the skill of actors who seem to know that one false move could tip the whole enterprise into comedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Quiet, simple and soaked in sorrow, Hitler's Children takes a stripped-down approach to an emotionally sophisticated subject.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Nonetheless, the film's homespun quality (Ms. Canty, whose childlike voice provides intermittent narration, simply describes herself in the publicity notes as "the mom of four kids") works in its favor, as does its maker's agitated sincerity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Matching her subject’s lackadaisical rhythms, Ms. Huber has shaped an unusually poetic biopic.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Mills (drawing on his own experiences and doing triple duty as the director and screenwriter) gives a performance of rancid single-mindedness. It’s a fearlessly unsympathetic role that provides plenty of space for train-wreck humor but almost no wiggle room for redemption.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Digging into the psychological space between her wildly public life and intensely private death, Everything Is Copy is a pickle slathered in whipped cream. Just like its subject.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Discrimination against nomadic populations is hardly restricted to Romania, but the integration of that country's largest ethnic minority seems particularly pressing. If only that view were shared by the Romanian adults on screen, most of whom display a shocking degree of prejudice.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What follows is something rarely seen in American movies: a sincerely humane examination of what it means to experience a crisis of faith. Tender, bittersweet and often gently comedic, Corinne's 20-year journey toward (and around, and away from) her God has a loose, searching rhythm that's engrossingly unpredictable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smartly written and flawlessly acted, Lovers of Hate is a Trojan horse, the kind of movie that begins so self-effacingly that we don't expect any surprises.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This devastatingly raw documentary shows that for some the fighting may stop, but the suffering continues.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lively, swift, vibrantly colorful and for the most part wonderfully acted, the film is slyly aware of the daytime talk show as a vehicle for women's concerns.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Love is a mournful thriller about the myth of assimilation and the way nurture - or, more precisely, the lack of it - fashions identity and character. Elegantly directed by Vladan Nikolic using multiple viewpoints and an elliptical, nonlinear narrative, the movie presents a New World disrupted by old grievances and a neglected community living by its own rules.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Communicating much with very little, Guidelines (“La Marche à Suivre”) presents a profoundly hopeful view of education as a civilizing force and a haven for transformation. There have been many more eventful high school movies, but rarely one that’s more absorbed in the forming of adults and the shaping of citizens.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The dead are unquiet and the living are terrified in The Road, a powerfully atmospheric blend of ghostly encounters, horrific situations and missing-persons mysteries from the Philippine director Yam Laranas.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A slight yet profound exploration of generational choices and our fear of living our parents’ lives.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Much better to focus on the tempestuous Mercutio (Hale Appleman, a standout), whose increasing volatility forms the perfect counterpoint to Mr. Doyle's beaming Juliet and Seth Numrich's sensitive Romeo. Punctuated by eerily static shots of empty basketball courts and deserted hallways, Mercutio's blustering menace is as timeless as the romance he seeks to derail.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As its brilliantly choreographed -- and appropriately modest -- climax proves, given the right ingredients, even the simplest story can leave you gasping.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 85 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Beautiful Boy is the antithesis of melodrama. Painfully perceptive and relentlessly raw, this intimate observation of a couple in extremis plays out with such subdued intensity that, by the end, audiences will very likely feel as wrung out as its embattled stars.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 85 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Jagged and gentle, shocking and sweet, Life During Wartime finds the King of Cringe more concerned than usual about forgiveness: who deserves it, and who is capable of bestowing it. True to form, though, he's not telling.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The wonder of Black's performance here is its empathy and balance: inasmuch as he can disappear into any role, he dissolves into this one with no hint of mocking remove. It's a beautiful thing to see.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 85 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film's greatest accomplishment is its ability to change tone at least three times without losing the audience.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Frequently moving and quietly enlightening, Last Train Home is about love and exploitation, sacrifice and endurance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    One of the most entertaining documentaries to appear since "Exit Through the Gift Shop," a film similarly obsessed with role playing and deception.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Coming in at a tight 75 minutes, this strikingly original travelogue glides on the lovely lilt of Mr. Santos's Portuguese narration.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Economical in the extreme — but without appearing cash-poor — this tightly wound thriller proves that minimal resources can sometimes produce more than satisfying results.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Kid With a Bike feels as vulnerable as Cyril's unformed character. Within its tight 87 minutes, not a lot happens, unless you count the saving of a life.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfolding with a minimum of dialogue, Francisca’s maturation from watcher to doer would be laughable if performed with less nuance or photographed with less originality.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Not since "Flashdance" has a lobster dinner been seasoned with so much unspoken emotion.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Predictable musical montages fail to deflate an exceptionally subtle script (by Mr. Vallely) and Ms. Ynoa’s astonishingly mature, hard-to-pin-down performance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A searing look at the role of American evangelical missionaries in the persecution of gay Africans, Roger Ross Williams’s God Loves Uganda approaches this intersection of faith and politics with some fairness and a good deal of outrage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Stingingly attuned to the tension between long-term love and last-minute misgivings, Between Us makes a familiar situation feel remarkably fresh.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A tale of two siblings -- one basking in memories, the other fleeing them -- Prodigal Sons grapples with identity through the prism of sibling rivalry. In the end its conclusions have little to do with gender and everything to do with acceptance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The two leads are mesmerizing, hurling themselves into their physically demented roles with ferocious commitment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ignoring critical issues like financial transparency, Ms. Sackler sells her viewpoint with four admirable, striving families, each of whose tots could charm the fleas off a junkyard dog.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Gruesome without being gory, The Autopsy of Jane Doe achieves real scares with a minimum of special effects.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Since his debut in 1987 with "Red Sorghum" Mr. Zhang has made more controlled films but never one that's more fun. With Curse of the Golden Flower he aims for Shakespeare and winds up with Jacqueline Susann. And a good thing too.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Consistently smart and delicate as a spider web, Bridge to Terabithia is the kind of children’s movie rarely seen nowadays. And at a time when many public schools are being forced to cut music and art from the curriculum, the story’s insistence on the healing power of a nurtured imagination is both welcome and essential.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The music is lovely, and the animation is soft and imaginatively detailed. Patema and Age may not know what’s upside down or right-way up, but their director is never in any doubt.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Somewhere between documentary and dramatization, fact and impression, Strange Culture molds one man’s tragedy into an engrossing narrative experiment that defies categorization.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Moving and maddening in almost equal measure, Brian Knappenberger’s The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz is a devastating meditation on what can happen when a prescient thinker challenges corporate interests and the power of the state.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This challenging and mesmerizing documentary captures horror and joy with the same gorgeous dispassion.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A disturbing look at reprogramming that masquerades as rehabilitation. Having been forced to drink the Kool-Aid, Mr. Gaglia has produced a work that's as much an act of emesis as of filmmaking.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Playing with memory — the characters’ and our own — allows Mr. Boyle and his cinematographer, Anthony Dod Mantle, to conjure some of the movie’s loveliest, most melancholy images.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This low-budget debut by Joshua Overbay cooks a surprising amount of tension from the barest minimum of ingredients.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cheerfully partial and unapologetically deferential to its subject’s operatic self-promotion, Jodorowsky’s Dune makes you wish that he had scraped together the final $5 million needed, we are told, to realize his dream.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Working with grace and patience, Mr. Fernández makes the mundane captivating.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Captured more for poetry than for clarity, the topography of penalties and free kicks can be impossible to follow. But Léo Bittencourt’s photography has flash and flair, and hardscrabble determination on a real-life field of dreams has a narrative all its own.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Immersed in the alien beauty of the Kazakh steppe, "The Gift to Stalin" moves slowly but engages thoroughly.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This wonderfully weird documentary pinpoints the desire to preserve fleeting glories.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Engrossing, poetic and often very funny, "Position," like its predecessors, uses the lens of a single family to view the tumult of an entire country.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unspooling with virtually no music and a seriously unsettling sound design, Goodnight Mommy gains significant traction from small moments.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offers one man's extraordinary life as a gateway to a larger history of tragedy and transition. It's an unflinching account of what farming takes -- and, more important, what it gives back.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the film eventually caves to sentiment and stereotype, its alert performances and muted rhythms offer much to enjoy in the interim.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The trick to enjoying The Town, Ben Affleck's follow-up to his impressive 2007 directing debut, "Gone, Baby, Gone," is to expect nothing but pulpy entertainment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A picture so modest and minor-key that the emotional bruise it leaves may take days to develop.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sleep Tight is a nifty little thriller that dances on the boundary between plausible and preposterous.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A blue collar poem threaded with old-timer memories and present-day pain, Braddock America pays bittersweet tribute to a once-thriving Pennsylvania steel town and those who stuck around to bear witness to its decline.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Shot in luminous whites, pulsing blacks and gorgeous grays, the stories explore sexual insecurity, rural superstition and sociopolitical anxieties with an inventiveness that's seldom scary but never less than mesmerizing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie dives into the black arts with methodical restraint and escalating unease.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Impossible to categorize, this stunningly original mix of the macabre and the magical combines comedy, tragedy, fantasy and love story into an utterly singular package that’s beholden to no rules but its own.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Art house meets grind house in Cargo 200, Alexey Balabanov’s morbidly compelling thriller set in the Soviet Union.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A frustratingly fragmented yet warmly intimate portrait of an evolving bond that frays but doesn’t sever.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A fascinating profile of the online pornography provider Kink.com.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film presents an often sharp commentary on dueling beliefs and idiocies that unfolds in lush pastel hues and distinctively retro drawings.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Rising above a minuscule budget with ladles of charm and a tender poignancy, Little Feet is a quixotic poem to youthful resourcefulness.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s congeniality, however, in no way dulls its humor or the sharpness of its observations.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    His well-rehearsed rhetoric is shockingly persuasive, and since the majority of his premises are verifiable, any weakness in his argument lies in inferences so terrifying that reasonable listeners may find themselves taking his advice and stocking up on organic seeds. (Those with no access to land can, postapocalypse, use them as currency.)
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Johanna Schwartz’s miraculously hopeful documentary, They Will Have to Kill Us First: Malian Music in Exile, delivers a vibrant testimony of resilience under oppression.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    There’s a stillness to the filmmaking, coupled with Saunder Jurriaans and David Bensi’s truly lovely original score, that lends specific shots... a near-heartbreaking melancholy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfolding in somber tones and among hard surfaces, Arbitrage has the slickness of new bank notes and the confidence of expensive tailoring.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The setup is commonplace, but the scenery is delicious, the dialogue refreshingly tart and the keen supporting cast frisky or affecting, as the occasion demands.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A singularly focused and avant-garde talent, Ms. Streb bends the messy rush of risk to her indomitable will.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    All the more disappointing, then, when what has been a celebration of last-ditch passion slides abruptly into a cautionary tale. Until that point the movie's refreshingly unbiased tone allows us to make our own moral judgments, teasing us with the possibility that, occasionally, the scarlet woman can escape unbranded. I, for one, was rooting for her.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    And by exploring the lighter side of communal action - the camaraderie and cruising that turned weekly meetings into what one member calls "a combination of serious politics and joyful living" - he uncouples the gravity of the cause from the perceived humorlessness of advocacy. Foot soldiers for the dying, the members of Act Up never forgot how to live.

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