Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,177 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Thunder Soul
Lowest review score: 0 America the Beautiful
Score distribution:
1177 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Thought-provoking rather than deeply philosophical, Ever Since the World Ended features many engaging performances and several outstanding ones.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Bug
    The escalating hysteria and grisly set pieces of Bug may strain credulity, but Ms. Judd has never been more believable as a woman condemned to attract the wrong kind of man.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The light is menacing, the mood watchful and the action scenes have a crude, desperate energy that gets the job done. Here, violence is neither weightless nor glorified, but just another obstacle on the way to a better future.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A middling zombie movie elevated by clever writing and gooeylicious special effects, Kerry Prior's Revenant toys with big themes but settles for uneasy laughs.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Barbaric, elegant, primitive, erotic, revolting, thrilling: the movie, like bullfighting itself, is all of these.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Paying to see Countdown to Zero is like tipping a fortuneteller to predict the manner of your death.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Somewhere Between presents an effortlessly moving but superficial profile of four bright Chinese girls and their adoptive American families.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fishing Without Nets turns the hijacking drama into a morally murky contemplation of deprivation and desperation.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    For those who care about the winning and losing of championship belts, the film's slow-motion attention to pugilistic style and powerhouse punches is thrillingly instructive.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    For a tale spiked with so much torment, Fugitive Pieces feels remarkably soothing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fair to a fault, "Elephant" omits what could be considered crucial voices - like lawmakers, the Humane Society (which helped finance the film) and mental-health professionals - in its attempt to understand those who believe their particular beast is as harmless as a kitten. At least until it rips someone's face off.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging old-fashioned comedy routines with up-to-the-minute politics - all of it enabled by fun-loving personalities and a gift for rousing original songs - the ladies emit a genuine warmth that reels audiences in.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Strip away the smatterings of sex and globs of gore, and children would really get a kick out of Tale of Tales, Matteo Garrone’s colorful and kinky exploration of what women want. And what men will do to give it to them.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Temperate in tone but screaming with subtext, Jamie Marks Is Dead climbs above the current glut of supernaturally inclined entertainment by dint of a hushed unease that permeates almost every frame.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The humor is delicate, and the performances sweet and sure; the script (by the director, Max Mayer) is not entirely predictable, and the Manhattan locations (lovingly photographed by Seamus Tierney) have a starry-eyed glaze.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What We Become is a very pretty movie with a very dark heart. The payoff is brutal, but earned.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A perceptive and beautifully acted drama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Empathetic and nosy, Ms. Ben-Ari is no unequivocal cheerleader for breast over bottle: If anything, her subjects’ time-consuming struggles and evident exhaustion could put a damper on the natural-feeding plans of the most sanguine new parent. Yet the film isn’t a downer.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s guileless, heartfelt style veers perilously close to corniness at times, but the superb cast dares you to mock.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    La Soga moves with a crazed energy that denies moral nuance. But the banal narrative (based on events in Mr. Perez's life) is elbowed aside by Josh Crook's eccentric direction and images that the cinematographer, Zeus Morand, brands with near-poetic intensity.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Replacing the earlier movie's more depraved sequences with sustained tension and truly unnerving editing, the director proves adept at managing mayhem in cramped spaces.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As we join throngs of excited citizens at a public vote-counting, their uninhibited zeal for the process only highlights the jaded cynicism that threatens to overwhelm our own.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A sad chronicle of absent fathers and messed-up mothers, drugs as currency and violence as the period at the end of every argument.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An intimate, elusive drama about the boundaries of friendship and nationality, Fräulein presents immigrant lives with significantly more empathy than detail. For some, though, the movie’s narrative shorthand will be enough.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Presenting neither an argument for medication nor its rejection, Billy the Kid is a deceptively simple portrait of a shockingly self-aware and articulate young man.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    More than anything, a Tyler Perry movie is an interactive experience, and Why Did I Get Married? is no exception. At the screening I attended, it was often difficult to hear the dialogue between bouts of enthusiastic applause and shouts of “You go, girl!”
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Crammed with colorful interviews, digital animation and live performances, this frisky and forthright film by Dean Budnick chronicles a vision of financing social progress with really great tunes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Raw and resolute, this unsettling fable feels driven by an anger that remains largely unexpressed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    That assured style is the spackle that holds Kill List together: when the plot doglegs into insanity, and the characters follow suit, this brutal fever dream refuses to fall apart.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though at times a tad worshipful, the film's tone is ultimately more awed than hagiographic, its commenters too cleareyed and candid to back away from negative publicity or public disenchantment.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Seamlessly dovetailing style and subject, Dragonslayer, a poetic and affectionate portrait of the professional skateboarder Josh Sandoval.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though rife with implausibilities, Transpecos is fortified by strong acting and a location whose desolate beauty is a gift to Jeffrey Waldron’s serene camera.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A highly respectable piece of genre entertainment, one with a little more class than most.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Khan displays a strong visual sense that makes pivotal scenes pop. The unlikely ending strains credulity, but what this confident debut lacks in subtlety, it more than makes up in execution.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite its immersion in tragedy and decline, So Much So Fast is leavened by unexpected humor.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As a trippy, trifling memorial to a time before its eponymous club was a mini-mall and rave culture a woozy memory, Limelight delivers the messed-up goods.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A creaky, sometimes forced drama that burrows under your skin if you let it, Welcome to the Rileys lurches along like Lois' car as she tries to exit her garage for the first time in years.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like many relationships, Breaking Upwards starts in bed and ends on the street. The journey in between, however, feels as new as anything a tiny budget and a boatload of talent could produce.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even if you resist the film's claims of being based on one family's actual experiences, The Possession is eerily enjoyable pulp. Perched somewhere between "The Exorcist" and "The Amityville Horror" - and with a dash of "The Unborn" - the story benefits from an unusually restrained sound design and special effects that enhance but never obliterate its troubled-family center.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The cannibals, coconuts and landlocked locations have been replaced by the high-seas high jinks that made the first film so enjoyable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    That space between reality and mirage is where Ms. de Van’s strength, and this movie’s true horror, lies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film is not a primer on this heartbreaking condition. Instead it recounts a deeply personal, highly subjective and inarguably thought-provoking story of one family’s quest for a certain kind of peace.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If we brush aside the unanswered questions, what we’re left with is a simple tale of two men: One who may have been lost, and one who only felt that way.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Dinosaur 13 may not be the best documentary, but as a scientific soap opera, it’s a doozy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Its straggling, true-crime narrative, leaping hither and yon like a dog chasing butterflies, is not what holds the film together; the real glue is the emergence of a parallel between location and suspect, between literal dumping ground and figurative. This is so effective that there was no need for the directors to conduct a handheld, "Blair Witch"-y foray into the nighttime woods -- their film is creepy enough in broad daylight.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Rare enough to make NoBody’s Perfect an exemplar of fresh-air filmmaking that addresses the devastating legacy of the drug thalidomide with acidic wit and grumpy honesty.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This is nature defanged and declawed for kiddie consumption, so the emphasis is on awwww-filled moments.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    For all its enthusiastic vulgarity and truly terrible punk rock, We Are Mari Pepa is a gently endearing portrait of four amiable Mexican teenagers feeling their way toward adulthood.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The narrative may flag, but the doomsday atmosphere and George Liddle’s production design remain vivid until the final, blood-splattered reel.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Funny and feisty, gritty and sometimes grim, this first feature from the photographer Elaine Constantine delivers a sweaty snapshot of a very specific time and place.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Adopting an appealingly low-key approach to a high-stakes subject, this gently observant drama from Geoff Marslett takes its sweet time introducing the girl to the gun, but when it does, we’re all but guaranteed to care.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Soft in tone and muted in color, Waiting for August is a child’s-eye view of one family — among many in today’s Romanian economy — rising to the challenge of living without parents.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a lovers-on-the-lam blast of pure pulp escapism, so devoted to diversion that you probably won’t even notice the corn.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Touching on issues of artistic survival and the porous boundary between work and pleasure, Ms. Subrin, an accomplished visual artist and filmmaker, sifts addiction, celebrity and the plight of the aging actress into something rarefied yet real.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It's just as awesome as the tv show only bigger and prettier.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Photographed in crisp black and white by Nat Bouman, this enormously likable movie keeps sexual politics on the back burner and the universal search for connection front and center.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Using mostly amateur performers and improvised dialogue, Mr. Silver has created a profoundly awkward riff on dysfunction that’s uneventful but not unrewarding.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Part tribute, part musical mystery, ’Tis Autumn: The Search for Jackie Paris shines an overdue spotlight on a great who got away.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Advocating freedom from a system that "doesn't want you to die and doesn't want you to get well," this hard-hitting film leaves us finally more hopeful than despairing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Fox may be a romantic, but he understands that love is rarely all you need.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Niall MacCormick's direction, while unfocused, locates a sweet center in the bonding of the two young girls, effortlessly capturing the way unexpected friendship, like first love, can completely alter the look of the world.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    In this visual caress of postindustrial blight, disintegration has never looked so gorgeous.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Some predictable plot turns aren’t as damaging as they could be, thanks to solid acting (there isn’t a weak performance in the bunch) and lead characters with distinct personalities and motivations.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A documentary that presents the sexual exploitation of young women as a systemic cancer that feeds on public misconception as much as male appetites.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cool and cerebral, Apparition stubbornly resists our desire to connect with its troubled characters... Even so, the film’s sophistication creates space for us to ponder deeper, unanswered questions.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If the movie’s hilariously cruel treatment of the halt and the lame upsets you, you can enjoy the crisp cinematography, operatically repulsive effects and frequently witty dialogue.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Repackaging the revenge thriller in parakeet colors and distinctive African beats, the Congolese writer and director Djo Tunda Wa Munga gives Viva Riva! a playful sensuality that goes a long way toward disguising formula.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Spanish writer and director Nacho Vigalondo has audacity to spare. Constructing a looping, economical plot and directing like a fire marshal in a flaming building, he conjures urgency and disorientation from the thinnest of air.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Siegel is no Cassandra: retaining the waggish tone of his previous documentary, "The Real Dirt on Farmer John" (released in 2007), he balances the doom-talking heads with cute animation and characters like Yvon Achard, a French "bee historian" who caresses the swarm with his elaborately styled facial hair.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Shot with a camera as excited as a squirrel-chasing dog, Cheerleaders has a girls-gone-wild energy and a twisted sense of humor.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Softened by some sweet, low-key moments between Vince and a fellow acting student (a very good Emily Mortimer) and by Mr. Garcia’s embodiment of disappointed middle age.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Captured mostly in gorgeous black and white, The Love We Make is alternately trite, touching, funny and fascinating.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Inert yet strangely compelling film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sluggish, stylized and frequently washed in a bilious green tint, The Missing Person is yet oddly irresistible.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    All This Panic can feel glancing, its more painful revelations sliding in unheralded and slipping away just as quietly. What’s left is a dreamy diary of a time that passes so quickly yet impacts so profoundly.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A minimalist setup delivers maximum fright in Frozen, a nifty little chiller that balances its cold terrain with an unexpectedly warm heart.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ten years in the making, Hats Off is a documentary tribute to the 93-year-old actress Mimi Weddell, one of those people for whom the word “individual” seems especially apt.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cool It finally blossoms into an engrossing, brain-tickling picture as many of Al Gore's meticulously graphed assertions are systematically - and persuasively - refuted.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Portrayed entirely without sentiment, everyone here is equally abject, from the crushed victim of a human stampede to the starving baby playing in its own feces. The mood of scrambling desperation can be exhausting, but the filmmaking is never less than exhilarating.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Wrapping an existential question in the random rhythms of the road movie, Doomsdays comes at you sideways, its melancholy catching you off guard.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Keir Moreano’s muted yet moving record of his father's experience as a volunteer doctor in Vietnam, documents a journey that's substantially more philosophical than medical.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The whole enterprise rests on Ms. Gilsig, who plays Anna with a subtlety rarely required of her crazypants girlfriend on “Nip/Tuck” or her clingy spouse on “Glee.”
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As tadpoles morph into frogs, and fears are conquered, The Girl delivers a satisfying, sun-dappled fable about the kindness of strangers and the cruelty of peers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    More than anything, FrackNation underscores the sheer complexity of a process that offers a financial lifeline to struggling farmers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    West's throwback style and disdain for excess allows his characters to shine.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Directed by Hilla Medalia with exactly the right balance of musical theater and personal drama, After the Storm presents a touching affirmation of the healing power of right-brain stimulation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A droll Nietzschean fable that's fully aware of its lapses into absurdity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Monsters effortlessly compels. The ending may be pure sci-fi schmaltz, but it's schmaltz that this viewer, at least, could believe in.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It’s a vintage flashbulb moment of two men at the peak of their talents, one on his way to securing his second world championship, and the other between the twin triumphs of “Rosemary’s Baby” and “Chinatown.”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Assembled without frills or fuss, A Man Named Pearl is as much a portrait of a small Southern town as of an unassuming black folk artist.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    None of this is particularly cinematic (he relies much too heavily on title cards to fill in historical blanks), but it is engaging, mainly because the stakes were so high and the statesmanship so delicate.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Anyone looking for some idiosyncratic, visually stimulating entertainment this week could do worse than Where Is Where?, an intriguing narrative experiment by the Finnish artist and filmmaker Eija-Liisa Ahtila.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    That said, this deliciously nutty love story - sample dialogue: "Let me eat this heart, then we can pick azaleas together" - is blindingly gorgeous to look at and exceptionally well acted, at least by the women.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Dog Sweat (the title is slang for alcohol) is surprisingly polished, the young actors warmly believable despite being restricted by the film's narrow focus.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A slick and absorbing drama.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Silent Souls is part folk tale, part lesson in letting go. In its quiet acceptance of the passing of time, this unusual film reminds us that to die is not always the same as to disappear.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An enigmatic and utterly compelling story of incinerated art, unbridled egos and exotic plants.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An effervescent comedy coasting on the charisma of its stars.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Respectful and thorough, this unembellished true-crime story might have only regional appeal, but its depressing reminder of our failure to prevent similar calamities will resonate nationwide.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Its arguments range wide without going deep, but its factoids about the medical benefits of hanging out in a forest — and the cognitive costs of a noisy school or hospital — are fascinating and persuasive.

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