For 812 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Elza (Le bonheur d'Elza)
Lowest review score: 0 I Will Follow You Into the Dark
Score distribution:
812 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Relaxed performances and pillow-soft photography compensate somewhat for the story's narrow ambitions, but they're not enough to invigorate a movie that clearly would rather charm than challenge.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Before Silver hijacks the plot, Rodrigo Cortés's smart, talky screenplay and tense direction hold our attention, as much for the unpredictability of the story as the ease with which Sigourney Weaver and Cillian Murphy slide into their roles.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film's sweetness is endearing but too featherweight to engage.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It's tough to care about characters who spend most of their lives obsessing over the violent deaths of others.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Having devoted much of their lives to combating lupine myths by introducing Koani to wonder-struck schoolchildren, Mr. Weide and Ms. Tucker are ill served by a director who reduces the anti-wolf lobby to caricature and the debates over reintroducing wolves to the Northern Rockies to grossly biased clips.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film's kinky energy eventually wanes, the pileup of profanities losing its initial zing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Well acted and sporadically amusing - especially when Olivia Wilde's profanity-spewing stripper is around - Butter alternates between looking down its nose at Midwestern passions and cooing over smugly liberal values.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This scattershot investigation of the effects of Internet pornography on female behavior only ruffles the surface of a complex issue, one that demands a much larger sample than three white, educated women.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A story that, though sickly fascinating, is as crudely rendered as its images.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A well-meaning but inexpertly dramatized account of the roundup of 13,000 Parisian Jews in the summer of 1942.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Infinitely less than the sum of its parts, Antonino D'Ambrosio's Let Fury Have the Hour crams 50 thoughtful artists into a disappointingly muddled film.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a narrow, albeit intriguing window into a technological revolt that deserves a more far-reaching film than this one.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the directors, Kristi Jacobson and Lori Silverbush, smartly choose examples from among the working poor — reframing obesity as chronic malnourishment in areas where it’s easier to find a burger than a banana — they’re reluctant to get down in the political dirt.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    At its best when merging shocks with social commentary, this halting compilation improves significantly as it nears the end of the alphabet.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This Lithuanian love story from Kristina Buozyte offers a discomfiting blend of visual ecstasy and narrative sterility.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Shot with some wit and considerable speed, its short, sharp beatdowns are a refreshing change from the bloated action sequences favored by some of Mr. Kang’s genre contemporaries.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Grim, intelligent and vividly photographed by the director’s father, Philippe Lavalette, Inch’Allah works best when the camera alights on Ava and Rand, whose marvelously mobile faces convey all the complexity that Chloe lacks.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Flu
    The romance may be risible, but the scenes of mass panic and political desperation are slickly disturbing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Good Ol’ Freda celebrates an intensely private witness to four of the most public lives in pop-culture history.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Citizen is a heartfelt plea for charity, tolerance and all-around loving kindness — admirable aims sadly shackled to Sam Kadi’s inexpert direction.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Has plenty of humor but no satirical bite.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though the developing bond between the two men — one of whom is virtually nonverbal — is credible and even touching, the storytelling is too oblique to reel you in.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A muddled supernatural thriller that fails to capitalize on either its horrific prologue or eerie location.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Taking a credibility-straining premise and running with it, the Dutch director Arne Toonen gives Black Out way more energy than sense. Luckily, his antihero, Jos (Raymond Thiry), lacks neither.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    At once comic, tragic and goofily romantic, and resting too often on Odd’s clarifying narration, this young-adult lark breaches the nonsense barrier with some regularity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Vividly painting Queens in the early 1990s as a landscape of crack and graffiti, the filmmakers go on to smother any menace with a swoony-upbeat soundtrack and an “oh, those kooky kids” tone.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A tropical tornado of cadmium and cobalt, magenta and marigold, Carlos Saldanha’s frantic follow-up to his well-received 2011 animated feature, “Rio,” ups the ante on sound and movement but pays scant attention to story.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    13 Sins is occasionally inventive but mostly uninvolving.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Stagy, stiff and marinated in egg cream.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Employee of the Month is more tired than a Wal-Mart greeter at the end of a Saturday shift. One can only hope its halfhearted suggestion that winning isn't everything is some comfort if the movie's grosses are as disappointing as its jokes.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Puberty causes an exponential increase in evil -- and in incoherence -- in The Grudge 2.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The most depressing thing about this series is not the creativity of the bloodletting but the bleak view of human nature.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    You may see scarier movies this year, but none so redolent of decomposition.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A warning to parents everywhere about the dangers of indulging irrational behavior, Opal Dream is a sickly sweet tale of deep dysfunction masquerading as family solidarity.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If some of the characters won't be returning for the sequel, no matter. In all likelihood, neither will the audience.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Uninvolving and cliché-ridden (even shape-shifters, it seems, deserve a falling-in-love montage), Blood & Chocolate is "Romeo and Juliet" with fewer manners and more exotic dentition.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Leaving no cliché unturned, Coffee Date provides cheesy music, chats about "gaydar" and the obligatory are-you-looking-at-mine? urinal scene.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Reeking of self-righteousness and moral reprimand, Michael O. Sajbel’s Ultimate Gift”is a hairball of good-for-you filmmaking.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The turtles themselves may look prettier, but are no smarter; torn irreparably from their countercultural roots, our superheroes on the half shell have been firmly co-opted by the industry their creators once sought to spoof.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Set in North Florida and based on a book by Harry Crews, The Hawk Is Dying is a dreary study of male angst groaning beneath the weight of its own symbolism.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Self-consciously edgy and romantically limp.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An ill-advised sequel to "Are We There Yet?" and a feeble fable of better parenting through home improvement.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This latest recycling of foreign-grown frights shows less interest in horror than in healing.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfortunately, in keeping its inflammatory subject matter at arm’s length, Provoked does exactly the same to its audience.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A Michael Keaton outing is always cause for celebration, no matter how ramshackle the vehicle ("First Daughter," anyone?) or paper-thin the role.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A coming-of-age tale so treacly it doesn’t just tug your heartstrings, it attempts to glue them to your ribs.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The sledgehammer message is clear: Best friends can help when you need a McMansion, but only God can help when your husband needs a man.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A faux documentary grounded in ethnicity and mired in absurdity, Finishing the Game is a terrific idea still waiting to be fashioned into a real movie.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Whether on a Middle Eastern battlefield or the streets of New York, characters converse in stilted, expository mouthfuls that smother emotion.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    There’s a riveting story lurking inside Holly, a documentary-fiction hybrid about sex trafficking in Cambodia. It’s just not the one the filmmakers want to tell.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    There’s precious little to laugh at in The Sasquatch Gang, a sad attempt to board the loser-nerd comedy bandwagon.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like a feature-length version of the television sitcom “My Name Is Earl,” only Canadian -- and not funny.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Louder and more literal than its inspiration, The Eye benefits from a spiky performance by Alessandro Nivola as Sydney’s rehabilitation counselor. “Your eyes are not the problem,” he tells her at one point. He is so, so right.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Eyes popping and mouths agape, Martin Lawrence and Raven-Symoné mug their way through College Road Trip as if it were a silent movie -- which, come to think of it, would have been a lot less irritating.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Flash Point”attaches coldly professional visuals to a narrative so baffling that it’s rarely clear who is pounding on whom or why.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This is screenwriting by numbers. Unlike, say, Ken Loach’s marvelous “Bread and Roses,” Under the Same Moon is too busy sanctifying its protagonists and prodding our tear ducts to say anything remotely novel about immigration policies or their helpless victims.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    More tired than the fantasy it promotes, A Previous Engagement aims at middle-aged women with the subtlety of a pitch for bladder-control medication.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Plays less like a documentary than an E! exposé of lowlife skulduggery.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An animated twist on the Frankenstein story that never sparks to life.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The message may be clear -- suppress the past at your peril -- but the execution is a mess. As for the line-dancing soldiers, your guess is as good as mine.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Hounddog is never more than a sluggish dawdle from shack to swimmin' hole and back again.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Too leaden for adults and too baffling for kids.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Easy on the eyes but brutal on the ears.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie imprisons its talented cast (including Alia Shawkat as Danny’s overlooked soul mate and Brandon Hardesty as his worldly best friend) in roles that leave little room for anything but caricature.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smothering insightful moments in verbal and musical treacle (courtesy of Harriet Schock’s sticky songs), Mr. Jaglom displays an endearing lack of cynicism but an equal lack of discipline.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A muddled morality tale more interested in coming of age than getting of wisdom.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offering neither balance nor solutions (a segment on the overuse of medications like Ritalin is especially powerful, but especially in need of counterargument), The War on Kids questions what kind of citizens we are producing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The problem with these my-family-was-messed-up-and-I need-to-share projects is that they require an audience of complete strangers to give a damn. And while we sometimes do, it’s usually because the material is inherently compelling (“Tarnation”) or the filmmaking uncovers truths beyond the template of family therapy (“51 Birch Street”). Sadly, Phyllis and Harold fulfills neither requirement.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Intermittently beautiful but frustratingly leaden, Shutterbug labors ineffectually to promote authenticity over artifice. A heavily stylized paean to undoctored images, the movie never quite clicks as a succession of moving ones.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Puzzles more than it pleases.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Trotsky runs 20 minutes too long and several rungs above the head of its target audience. And though Mr. Baruchel can be very funny in small doses -- a slacker sidekick in “Knocked Up,” a gung-ho kid in “Tropic Thunder” -- here he swiftly becomes insufferable, a neurotic nudnik in funeral director attire and John Turturro hairdo.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Idolized in some quarters and reviled in others, Mr. Korine, now 37, may be a bit long in the tooth for the enfant terrible act.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Placidly photographed and lacking in urgency, "Survival" shows us the living flailing at fate and the dead just flailing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sincere performances elevate an underdeveloped script and awkward filmmaking in The Dry Land, a coming-home drama as inexpressive as its traumatized lead.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Belonging more in the realm of tragic melodrama than true crime, The Sicilian Girl is hobbled by sluggish direction (by Marco Amenta, who previously addressed Atria's story in his 1997 documentary, "One Girl Against the Mafia: Diary of a Sicilian Rebel"), and a revulsion to nuance.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A raunchy romantic comedy that, like its heroine, rarely has both feet on the ground.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This pointless parody dumps us in the fictional town of Sporks, Wash., a location lousy with vampires and werewolves.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Say what you like about "America's Next Top Model," any single episode of Tyra Banks's campy confection offers more insight into objectification and disposability than this film in its entirety.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offsetting its outlandish premise with believable performances, Rage (Rabia) delivers a heavy-handed metaphor for immigrant invisibility.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even those viewers who share the film's conviction that preparing a collection for New York Fashion Week is inherently fascinating may lose interest long before the final frock is fitted.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    We've heard it all before, if not in the schoolmarmish tones of Glenn Close, whose patronizing narration ("The earth is a miracle") makes the film feel almost as long as the life of its subject.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sluggish and derivative, I Am Number Four is another elaborate puberty metaphor with superpowers substituting for testosterone.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offensive only in Mr. Wortham's dreadful acting, Now & Later is part of a series at the Quad called "Unrated: A Week of Sex in Cinema" - a title that should ensure plenty of backsides on seats.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This drippy dramedy embraces every inappropriate-oldster cliché with depressing calculation.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An extravagantly corny ode to the collapse of the Cleveland mafia in the 1970s.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Imagine spending an afternoon watching a bunch of vagrants putter around on an abandoned city lot, and you've pretty much nailed the viewing experience of Earthwork, a painfully dull account of a year in the life of the Kansas crop artist Stan Herd.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An exhausted pileup of rock-movie clichés, The Perfect Age of Rock 'n' Roll presents artistic self-destruction with the solemnity of a movie that has invented a spanking-new genre.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a movie that isn't crummy, exactly, just blah: when the freakiest teeth on screen belong not to one of Walt Conti's animatronically realized sharks but to a good-ol'-boy called Red, you know you have a problem.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Notable at least in part for its fumbled potential, this health-care-industry melodrama possesses all the right ingredients: an idealistic young lawyer, a corrupt corporate villain and a sympathetic victim. It just fails to assemble them into a compelling whole.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This crackpot thriller from the usually competent Jim Sheridan leaves only one mystery unsolved: what on earth was he thinking?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This debut feature from Matthijs van Heijningen is as stiff as the Antarctic tundra. Where the earlier film pulsed with precisely calibrated paranoia and distinctly drawn characters, this inarticulate replay unfolds as mechanistically as a video game.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What could have been a moderately entertaining short film is yanked to intolerable lengths in Killing Bono, a shapeless rock-music caper that, like its deluded antihero, just doesn't know when to stop.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Red Hook Black crawls forward by means of stilted conversations and vacuous exchanges.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An intermittently interesting but fatally clichéd comedy of personal and professional suicide.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Defa and his cinematographer, Mike Gioulakis, are united in their disdain for information over mood: as the camera skitters spastically around its troubled schlub, the film becomes a muddy, minimalist moan of desperation.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a movie that feels more like a free-market sales pitch than like a critical look at one weapon in the poverty-fighting arsenal that may or may not offer long-term hope.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Political menace stalks youthful idealism in Putin's Kiss, a portentous, rather creepy documentary that masks its lack of historical context with an atmosphere of accumulating threat.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This archipelago of maneuvers, however jaw-dropping, never coheres into a real movie.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Donaldson has proven deftness with panting plots and knife-edge tension, but this cobbled-together noir does him no justice at all.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This mawkish rom-com mines class, ethnic and ambulatory boundaries for cheap laughs and cheap-looking visuals.