For 809 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Girls in the Band
Lowest review score: 0 Awakened
Score distribution:
809 movie reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A fascinating study of a man, and a firm, deeply changed by catastrophe.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Girls in the Band is everything a worthwhile documentary should be, and then some: engaging, informative, thorough and brimming with delightful characters.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Dropping us into a perfect storm of avarice, this cool and incisive snapshot of global capitalism at work is as remarkable for its access as for its refusal to judge.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like a Ken Loach drama stripped to bare bones, The Arbor springs to life in the bright bitterness of Dunbar's prose, showcased in alfresco performances of contentious scenes from the play.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Remarkable as much for its speculative restraint as for its philosophical reach.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Remarkable patchwork of unremarkable lives.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Coming in at a tight 75 minutes, this strikingly original travelogue glides on the lovely lilt of Mr. Santos's Portuguese narration.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With marvelous discipline, Mr. Shapiro crams a wealth of material into a tight 77 minutes, smoothly communicating the group effort required to achieve the perfect shot.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Something unexpectedly profound emerges from the flimsiest of stories in Stranger Things, a drama so modest and trusting of its two leads that any directing flourishes might have shattered its spell.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Exit could be a new subgenre: the prankumentary. Audiences, however, would be advised simply to enjoy the film on its face -- even if that face is a carefully contrived mask.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cool-headed, lighthearted and outrageously entertaining.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Visually distinctive and aurally delightful, "Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench" has style to burn. A soulful black-and-white commentary on love, art and their competing demands, this Boston-based musical from Damien Chazelle floats on a wave of spontaneity and charm.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Engrossing, poetic and often very funny, "Position," like its predecessors, uses the lens of a single family to view the tumult of an entire country.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like the director's cover story, the movie is a Trojan horse: an exceptionally well-made documentary that unfolds like a spy thriller, complete with bugged hotel rooms, clandestine derring-do and mysterious men in gray flannel suits.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unapologetically designed both to inform and affect, Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s delicately lacerating documentary, Blackfish, uses the tragic tale of a single whale and his human victims as the backbone of a hypercritical investigation into the marine-park giant SeaWorld Entertainment.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Four years in the making, Marwencol emerges as a number of things: an absorbing portrait of an outsider artist; a fascinating journey from near-death to active life; a meditation on the brain's ability to forge new pathways when old ones have been destroyed.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Drag Me to Hell has a tonic playfulness that’s unabashedly retro, an indulgent return to Mr. Raimi’s goofy, gooey roots.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A film that begins as a family quest but evolves into a gripping study of know-don't-tell reticence and the umbilical tie of a lost homeland.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Big Words is an engrossing, coming-of-middle-age drama that shows how disappointment can fester and derail a life. By the end, hope and change seem possible but far from guaranteed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Requiem is a moving study of a tortured young woman more at peace with medieval ritual than with modern medicine.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    His film opens with a lullaby, and while there is indeed something soothing in his images of repetitive, backbreaking toil, the music also serves as a reminder of childhood lost.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Buoyed by a fully integrated soundtrack, Kati With an I delivers a lovingly personal observation of young people at a crossroads. The film's sound is not always crisp, but no matter: Kati's story is written in every vital, vérité frame.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Red White & Blue proves the director a bona fide storyteller with more tools in his arsenal than shock and awe.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    By introducing funky licks, fancy footwork and many of his own compositions to the band's stodgy set list of jazz standards, this indomitable leader (whose declining health adds a poignant twang to the film's final scenes) instilled racial pride alongside musical competency.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Astonishingly, this is neither as depressing nor as arm-twistingly uplifting as you might expect. Mr. DaSilva’s experience behind a camera shows in his brisk pacing, clear narrative structure and the awareness that a story of sickness needs lighthearted distractions.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ms. Scherson’s style — backed wholeheartedly by the cool cinematography of Ricardo de Angelis — may value mood over information, but it’s the perfect vehicle for a portrait of two damaged souls grasping for a security they no longer possess.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    When I Saw You is a soft-centered child’s-eye view of alienation, toughened by fine acting (Saleh Bakri shines as a fighter drawn to Ghaydaa) and Hélène Louvart’s full-bodied photography.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Art house meets grind house in Cargo 200, Alexey Balabanov’s morbidly compelling thriller set in the Soviet Union.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    But instead of a dignified stroll down genealogy lane, Mr. Solnicki has made a sparking, gossipy soap opera that’s riddled with emotion and stuffed with strong characters.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This challenging and mesmerizing documentary captures horror and joy with the same gorgeous dispassion.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite its immersion in tragedy and decline, So Much So Fast is leavened by unexpected humor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Patiently photographed by Carlos Vásquez, who bestows the same gentle attention on grainy snapshots and the beautifully ruined face of an aging drag queen, 108 peels back layers of delusion and dishonesty.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Discrimination against nomadic populations is hardly restricted to Romania, but the integration of that country's largest ethnic minority seems particularly pressing. If only that view were shared by the Romanian adults on screen, most of whom display a shocking degree of prejudice.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It's potent stuff, delving into pornography, incest, murder and mutilation in the company of alienated men and unhappy, sometimes cruel women.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Cheerfully partial and unapologetically deferential to its subject’s operatic self-promotion, Jodorowsky’s Dune makes you wish that he had scraped together the final $5 million needed, we are told, to realize his dream.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A slight yet profound exploration of generational choices and our fear of living our parents’ lives.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Offers one man's extraordinary life as a gateway to a larger history of tragedy and transition. It's an unflinching account of what farming takes -- and, more important, what it gives back.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Warmhearted and defiantly unsentimental, Grandma, a Thousand Times gains lightness from Teta's tart observations.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Illustrating the film's rags-to-ring narrative with panoramic mountain views and compact shots of young bodies punching their way up the food chain, Mr. Sun straddles ancient and modern, tranquillity and turmoil, with equal sureness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The very definition of modest, Las Acacias articulates emotional transformation with simplicity and grace. Rarely has a film managed to say so much while saying so little.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    One of the most entertaining documentaries to appear since "Exit Through the Gift Shop," a film similarly obsessed with role playing and deception.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A searing look at the role of American evangelical missionaries in the persecution of gay Africans, Roger Ross Williams’s God Loves Uganda approaches this intersection of faith and politics with some fairness and a good deal of outrage.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A mood poem to summer loving and sexual awakening, It Felt Like Love powerfully evokes a time when flesh is paramount, and peer behavior is the standard by which we judge our own.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Circo offers a touching chronicle of a dying culture harnessed to ambitions that remain very much alive.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Michael Brown (a renowned mountaineer), digs below the adventure itself to reveal the gaping holes in our veteran care. Doing so, he translates a collage of experiences - some desperate, some hopeful, all tragic - into a first-person commentary on the malign reverberations of war.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Naturalistic and mysterious, Nana is terrifyingly dependent on its diminutive star. Insisting on neither written lines nor predetermined actions (the film's short script was used primarily to obtain financing), Ms. Massadian, who worked with the child for almost two years, has coaxed a performance of remarkable lucidity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It’s a brutally unsympathetic portrait of situational anxiety that withholds comfort from Paul and viewer alike, and Mr. Semans refuses to relent.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Silent Souls is part folk tale, part lesson in letting go. In its quiet acceptance of the passing of time, this unusual film reminds us that to die is not always the same as to disappear.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Bathed in the flamingo colors and Caribbean rhythms of its location, this deeply personal debut from the writer and director Mariette Monpierre develops with a lingering attention to sensation and sound.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smartly incorporating Sasa Zivkovic’s sweet and simple animation, as well as an exhilarating, punk-infused soundtrack, Mr. Persiel extends the film’s appeal beyond hard-core skaters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The best concert films achieve a marriage of sound and image that feels effortlessly harmonious, and in that regard Inni, a musical portrait of the Icelandic band Sigur Ros, leaves most of its genre in the dust.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An affectionate, rollicking guide to the drive-in classics of Australian filmmaking from the 1970s and ’80s.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s small group of primary characters slips from joy to fury to murderous suspicion with faultless fluidity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Carefully assembled and soberly presented, Robert May’s Kids for Cash takes a lacerating look at America’s juvenile justice system.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging the sacred and the profane, the bloody and the batty, Love Exposure tunnels into serious topics - warped parenting, sexual intolerance and the way religious cults enslave damaged souls - with a hilariously blasphemous shovel.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Hectic and harebrained, this galloping French thriller tosses a potpourri of plot points - crooked cops, sleazy gangsters, stolen drugs and an underage hostage - into a packed-to-the-gills nightclub, and stirs. Repeatedly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This fabulously inventive debut feature, written and directed by the British comedian Joe Cornish, never flags.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s guileless, heartfelt style veers perilously close to corniness at times, but the superb cast dares you to mock.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Matching her subject’s lackadaisical rhythms, Ms. Huber has shaped an unusually poetic biopic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The filmmakers work tirelessly to parallel their undersea world with the larger universe, offering genteel reminders of our mutual dependence.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A movie of stark contrasts and zigzagging motives, Beauty in Trouble moves from the golden serenity of a Tuscan villa to the powdery chaos of a Czech garage without sacrificing thematic confidence or nuanced performances.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even while embracing the breathless beats of the crime thriller, Graceland holds tight to its concern for exploited children.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Presenting neither an argument for medication nor its rejection, Billy the Kid is a deceptively simple portrait of a shockingly self-aware and articulate young man.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lively, swift, vibrantly colorful and for the most part wonderfully acted, the film is slyly aware of the daytime talk show as a vehicle for women's concerns.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A tale of two siblings -- one basking in memories, the other fleeing them -- Prodigal Sons grapples with identity through the prism of sibling rivalry. In the end its conclusions have little to do with gender and everything to do with acceptance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film presents an often sharp commentary on dueling beliefs and idiocies that unfolds in lush pastel hues and distinctively retro drawings.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Vividly depicting the indignities of the flesh, Porfirio offers a harshly sensual portrait of a man imprisoned by paralysis and the callousness of the state.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Consistently smart and delicate as a spider web, Bridge to Terabithia is the kind of children’s movie rarely seen nowadays. And at a time when many public schools are being forced to cut music and art from the curriculum, the story’s insistence on the healing power of a nurtured imagination is both welcome and essential.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging the sustainability worries of guitar enthusiasts and environmentalists with the hard-cash concerns of logging corporations and Native American land developers, Maxine Trump’s thoughtful documentary wrests clarity from complexity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Raw and resolute, this unsettling fable feels driven by an anger that remains largely unexpressed.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Its straggling, true-crime narrative, leaping hither and yon like a dog chasing butterflies, is not what holds the film together; the real glue is the emergence of a parallel between location and suspect, between literal dumping ground and figurative. This is so effective that there was no need for the directors to conduct a handheld, "Blair Witch"-y foray into the nighttime woods -- their film is creepy enough in broad daylight.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Painfully stark yet utterly magnetic, You Don't Like the Truth: 4 Days Inside Guantánamo presents excerpts from the 2003 interrogation of the 16-year-old Omar Khadr, a Canadian citizen accused of killing an American soldier during a firefight in an Afghan village.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A big, beautiful, rambling immersion in a passion whose heat is fueled primarily by its impossibility.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Educates without lecturing and engages without effort.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As we join throngs of excited citizens at a public vote-counting, their uninhibited zeal for the process only highlights the jaded cynicism that threatens to overwhelm our own.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Part tribute, part musical mystery, ’Tis Autumn: The Search for Jackie Paris shines an overdue spotlight on a great who got away.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    And by exploring the lighter side of communal action - the camaraderie and cruising that turned weekly meetings into what one member calls "a combination of serious politics and joyful living" - he uncouples the gravity of the cause from the perceived humorlessness of advocacy. Foot soldiers for the dying, the members of Act Up never forgot how to live.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A tale of two brothers, one band and a boatload of psychological baggage, Mistaken for Strangers is, like its maker, scruffy, undisciplined and eager to be loved. The big surprise is how easy it is to comply.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A heartbreaking and meticulous documentary about life inside a blue-jeans factory in China.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A warm, entertaining compendium of counterculture voices and literary landmarks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Korean director Hong Sang-soo unleashes yet another emotionally stunted antihero in Night and Day, a rambling study of male arrested development.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a movie that evolves naturally from the filmmaker's compassion for her subject; as much as possible, she remains off camera, and her immense act of charity is never permitted to become the film's focus. Instead this remarkable documentary offers a brief but satisfying look at a defiantly self-sufficient life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fateful and funny, haunting and magical.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Recording every success and setback, the wrenching documentary Crime After Crime favors the personal over the political, creating a no-frills portrait of a stoic and remarkably unembittered woman.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This is nature defanged and declawed for kiddie consumption, so the emphasis is on awwww-filled moments.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The filmmakers stage an amazing race that almost absolves an overstuffed plot and an over-reliance on coincidence.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Featuring exceptional people doing extraordinary things, Blindsight is one of those documentaries with the power to make you re-examine your entire life -- or at least get off the couch.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Spirited, probing and frequently hilarious, it coasts on the fearless charm of its front man and the eye-opening candor of its interviewees, most of them women.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s unvarying lack of drama or direction can be wearing, but the schlubby originality of its subject fully repays the longueurs.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Smartly written and flawlessly acted, Lovers of Hate is a Trojan horse, the kind of movie that begins so self-effacingly that we don't expect any surprises.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Morally cunning and with a tone as black as pitch, Pieta, the 18th film from the South Korean director Kim Ki-duk, is a deeply unnerving revenge movie in which redemption is dangled like a cat toy before a cougar.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    By ignoring Israeli voices and focusing only on the immigrants, Mr. Haar has produced a documentary filled with immediacy but free of analysis, a fascinating but ultimately unenlightening record of their plight.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Exquisitely captured in natural light by the cinematographer Alexis Zabé, Juan’s journey is framed by sherbet-colored houses and lemon sidewalks, dipping palm fronds and a burnished, turquoise horizon. The director calls his style "artisan cinema"; I just call it dreamy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ignoring critical issues like financial transparency, Ms. Sackler sells her viewpoint with four admirable, striving families, each of whose tots could charm the fleas off a junkyard dog.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Not one for climactic endings or predictable histrionics, the director, David Barker (who wrote the script with Ms. Meierhans and Mr. Godere), sticks to the stylistic template of his debut feature, "Afraid of Everything," which was filmed in 1999. Preferring the tease over the tell, his films coax us into looking beneath the surface. What we find is mostly up to us.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Nuances of faith, politics and sexual identity enrich what initially presents as a classic good son-bad son tale.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A documentary that yearns to be an adventure movie, Stolen Seas can't resist drowning its invaluable insights in thundering, drum-heavy music and flashing visuals. Magnificent in its thoroughness and nuance, this dense, multifaceted study of Somali piracy really needs to settle down.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This disorienting, dippy documentary makes one thing abundantly clear: for the Hubers, the toughest climb may be into their own heads.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Making sadomasochism appear less erotic than stamp collecting, Leap Year is a slow flare of emotional agony.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    If we must talk trash, Mr. Irons - assisted by a scientist or two and Vangelis's doomy score - is an inspired choice of guide. Soothing and sensitive, his liquid gaze alighting on oozing landfills and belching incinerators, he moves through the film with a tragic dignity that belies his whimsical neckwear and jaunty hats.