Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,144 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Ixcanul
Lowest review score: 0 Oconomowoc
Score distribution:
1144 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    For those who care about the winning and losing of championship belts, the film's slow-motion attention to pugilistic style and powerhouse punches is thrillingly instructive.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    For a tale spiked with so much torment, Fugitive Pieces feels remarkably soothing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fair to a fault, "Elephant" omits what could be considered crucial voices - like lawmakers, the Humane Society (which helped finance the film) and mental-health professionals - in its attempt to understand those who believe their particular beast is as harmless as a kitten. At least until it rips someone's face off.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Merging old-fashioned comedy routines with up-to-the-minute politics - all of it enabled by fun-loving personalities and a gift for rousing original songs - the ladies emit a genuine warmth that reels audiences in.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Strip away the smatterings of sex and globs of gore, and children would really get a kick out of Tale of Tales, Matteo Garrone’s colorful and kinky exploration of what women want. And what men will do to give it to them.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Temperate in tone but screaming with subtext, Jamie Marks Is Dead climbs above the current glut of supernaturally inclined entertainment by dint of a hushed unease that permeates almost every frame.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The humor is delicate, and the performances sweet and sure; the script (by the director, Max Mayer) is not entirely predictable, and the Manhattan locations (lovingly photographed by Seamus Tierney) have a starry-eyed glaze.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What We Become is a very pretty movie with a very dark heart. The payoff is brutal, but earned.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A perceptive and beautifully acted drama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Empathetic and nosy, Ms. Ben-Ari is no unequivocal cheerleader for breast over bottle: If anything, her subjects’ time-consuming struggles and evident exhaustion could put a damper on the natural-feeding plans of the most sanguine new parent. Yet the film isn’t a downer.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film’s guileless, heartfelt style veers perilously close to corniness at times, but the superb cast dares you to mock.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    La Soga moves with a crazed energy that denies moral nuance. But the banal narrative (based on events in Mr. Perez's life) is elbowed aside by Josh Crook's eccentric direction and images that the cinematographer, Zeus Morand, brands with near-poetic intensity.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Replacing the earlier movie's more depraved sequences with sustained tension and truly unnerving editing, the director proves adept at managing mayhem in cramped spaces.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As we join throngs of excited citizens at a public vote-counting, their uninhibited zeal for the process only highlights the jaded cynicism that threatens to overwhelm our own.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A sad chronicle of absent fathers and messed-up mothers, drugs as currency and violence as the period at the end of every argument.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An intimate, elusive drama about the boundaries of friendship and nationality, Fräulein presents immigrant lives with significantly more empathy than detail. For some, though, the movie’s narrative shorthand will be enough.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Presenting neither an argument for medication nor its rejection, Billy the Kid is a deceptively simple portrait of a shockingly self-aware and articulate young man.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    More than anything, a Tyler Perry movie is an interactive experience, and Why Did I Get Married? is no exception. At the screening I attended, it was often difficult to hear the dialogue between bouts of enthusiastic applause and shouts of “You go, girl!”
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Crammed with colorful interviews, digital animation and live performances, this frisky and forthright film by Dean Budnick chronicles a vision of financing social progress with really great tunes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Raw and resolute, this unsettling fable feels driven by an anger that remains largely unexpressed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    That assured style is the spackle that holds Kill List together: when the plot doglegs into insanity, and the characters follow suit, this brutal fever dream refuses to fall apart.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though at times a tad worshipful, the film's tone is ultimately more awed than hagiographic, its commenters too cleareyed and candid to back away from negative publicity or public disenchantment.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Seamlessly dovetailing style and subject, Dragonslayer, a poetic and affectionate portrait of the professional skateboarder Josh Sandoval.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Though rife with implausibilities, Transpecos is fortified by strong acting and a location whose desolate beauty is a gift to Jeffrey Waldron’s serene camera.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A highly respectable piece of genre entertainment, one with a little more class than most.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Khan displays a strong visual sense that makes pivotal scenes pop. The unlikely ending strains credulity, but what this confident debut lacks in subtlety, it more than makes up in execution.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Despite its immersion in tragedy and decline, So Much So Fast is leavened by unexpected humor.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    As a trippy, trifling memorial to a time before its eponymous club was a mini-mall and rave culture a woozy memory, Limelight delivers the messed-up goods.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A creaky, sometimes forced drama that burrows under your skin if you let it, Welcome to the Rileys lurches along like Lois' car as she tries to exit her garage for the first time in years.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like many relationships, Breaking Upwards starts in bed and ends on the street. The journey in between, however, feels as new as anything a tiny budget and a boatload of talent could produce.

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