Jeannette Catsoulis
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For 1,004 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Girls in the Band
Lowest review score: 0 The Tiger and the Snow
Score distribution:
1,004 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This is nature defanged and declawed for kiddie consumption, so the emphasis is on awwww-filled moments.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The narrative may flag, but the doomsday atmosphere and George Liddle’s production design remain vivid until the final, blood-splattered reel.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The humor is delicate, and the performances sweet and sure; the script (by the director, Max Mayer) is not entirely predictable, and the Manhattan locations (lovingly photographed by Seamus Tierney) have a starry-eyed glaze.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An affectionate, rollicking guide to the drive-in classics of Australian filmmaking from the 1970s and ’80s.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    More an infomercial than a movie, Rollin Binzer’s awed documentary is, at best, a well-earned tribute to one man’s unwavering vision and unrelenting hard work.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The film is not a primer on this heartbreaking condition. Instead it recounts a deeply personal, highly subjective and inarguably thought-provoking story of one family’s quest for a certain kind of peace.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Directed by Hilla Medalia with exactly the right balance of musical theater and personal drama, After the Storm presents a touching affirmation of the healing power of right-brain stimulation.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Anyone looking for some idiosyncratic, visually stimulating entertainment this week could do worse than Where Is Where?, an intriguing narrative experiment by the Finnish artist and filmmaker Eija-Liisa Ahtila.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A seductively fluid and tactile drama from the writer and director Karin Albou, explores love and identity through the prism of the female body and the rights of its owner.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unfailingly modest and profoundly humane, The Way We Get By profiles three people over 70 whose lives have been changed by a simple act of service.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sluggish, stylized and frequently washed in a bilious green tint, The Missing Person is yet oddly irresistible.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Garbage Dreams records the tremblings of a culture at a crossroads.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Respectfully and without dramatization (the ideas are electric enough), the directors observe a cross section of articulate evangelicals and accompany a Christian group on a revealing trip to Israel.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A minimalist setup delivers maximum fright in Frozen, a nifty little chiller that balances its cold terrain with an unexpectedly warm heart.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Softened by some sweet, low-key moments between Vince and a fellow acting student (a very good Emily Mortimer) and by Mr. Garcia’s embodiment of disappointed middle age.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A weird, wordy but oddly compelling thriller.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like many relationships, Breaking Upwards starts in bed and ends on the street. The journey in between, however, feels as new as anything a tiny budget and a boatload of talent could produce.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Rare enough to make NoBody’s Perfect an exemplar of fresh-air filmmaking that addresses the devastating legacy of the drug thalidomide with acidic wit and grumpy honesty.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Packed with illuminating interviews and lyrical movement, Breath Made Visible portrays a woman with angels in her feet and innovation in her blood. Long may she rock.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Never forgetting the rush of the game, the directors regularly serve up fleet footage of the team’s highs and lows, allowing the rhythms of the field to set the film’s volatile beat.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The result is a lovers-on-the-lam blast of pure pulp escapism, so devoted to diversion that you probably won’t even notice the corn.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Its straggling, true-crime narrative, leaping hither and yon like a dog chasing butterflies, is not what holds the film together; the real glue is the emergence of a parallel between location and suspect, between literal dumping ground and figurative. This is so effective that there was no need for the directors to conduct a handheld, "Blair Witch"-y foray into the nighttime woods -- their film is creepy enough in broad daylight.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Tom Shepard's quietly observant documentary tracks its stressed-out subjects through an array of personal and scholarly challenges.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Enjoy it; according to the spectacularly nauseating final moments, a cure for this virus seems unlikely, but “[REC] 3” (a k a “[REC] Apocalypse”) is a virtual certainty.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Paying to see Countdown to Zero is like tipping a fortuneteller to predict the manner of your death.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Portrayed entirely without sentiment, everyone here is equally abject, from the crushed victim of a human stampede to the starving baby playing in its own feces. The mood of scrambling desperation can be exhausting, but the filmmaking is never less than exhilarating.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    La Soga moves with a crazed energy that denies moral nuance. But the banal narrative (based on events in Mr. Perez's life) is elbowed aside by Josh Crook's eccentric direction and images that the cinematographer, Zeus Morand, brands with near-poetic intensity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    An unusually restrained and genuinely eerie little movie perched at the intersection of faith, folklore and female puberty.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Filled with clear, bright images and moments of skewed genius, this delicate debut effortlessly evokes those languid summer doldrums, when even a rotting girlfriend is better than no girlfriend at all.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The movie is sharp, charismatic and so light on its feet we never know which way it will turn.

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