For 154 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jen Chaney's Scores

Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Veep: Season 6
Lowest review score: 10 Kevin Can Wait: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 6 out of 154
154 tv reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Jen Chaney
    A faithful adaptation of the book that also brings new layers to Atwood’s totalitarian, sexist world of forced surrogate motherhood, this series is meticulously paced, brutal, visually stunning, and so suspenseful from moment to moment that only at the end of each hour will you feel fully at liberty to exhale.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Jen Chaney
    Every member of the ensemble cast is still performing at his or her peak, adding just the right amount of salt on dialogue that’s already high in sodium. ... Veep: it’s no longer just a brilliant satire. It’s almost--almost--something to which we can aspire.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jen Chaney
    The Son is a handsomely shot, well-acted, and respectable piece of work. But it also isn’t surprising or deeply insightful enough about its characters to truly stand out in the current over-capacity venue that is television in 2017.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    Even though Nobodies works from a familiar playbook and, like its bumbling heroes, can try a little too hard to ingratiate itself, it’s still fun, zippy, and Seinfeldian in its ability to braid together plot based on various humiliations.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    Shots Fired is admirably ambitious and impeccably cast, if occasionally hampered by some overly conventional narrative choices.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jen Chaney
    Trial & Error can be amusing at times. But too often, it feels like everyone involved in this series might tear a ligament in their effort to achieve what is supposed to be effortless wackiness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jen Chaney
    Just when you’re ready to break up with Love, it starts to works its magic on you, thanks to the charms of its cast and a suite of directors (Dean Holland, Joe Swanberg, Lynn Shelton, Maggie Carey, John Slattery) who have a knack for shining a light on the darker, comedic corners of human intimacy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    Time After Time is not an amateurish show; it’s actually quite polished.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    Like all good time-travel stories, Making History is smarter when it acknowledges the divide between the way things were than versus the way things are now, or, sometimes, the ways in which things haven’t progressed at all.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jen Chaney
    As it progresses and its narrative deepens, viewers are left with plenty of substantive matters to ponder, especially after its conclusion.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    While its early episodes are still working through a few kinks, it’s engaging enough to belong in the well-done category, too.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jen Chaney
    It is clear that The Good Fight is a very, very good show that’s worthy of commitment. If CBS wants its broadcast audience to also become habitual users of All Access, this smart spinoff makes for a pretty enticing gateway drug.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    At first glance, it seems like just another glossy, TV exploration of law and order, with Heigl in the role of fireball attorney crusading for justice while click-clacking through courtrooms in high heels. In a lot of ways, that’s exactly what Doubt is. But it also happens to be a solid showcase for Heigl and her fellow actors, including Laverne Cox.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jen Chaney
    Humans has delivered a second season that demonstrates a full, imaginative expansion of its narrative.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jen Chaney
    What sells the antics is the chemistry between its leads and the fun they’re so clearly having together.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 10 Jen Chaney
    It is too bad, and you--all of us, really, including Bill Paxton--deserve better.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jen Chaney
    As uniformly talented as the cast is, the characters feel quite thinly sketched at this stage.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    Z: The Beginning of Everything tries to capture the many facets of this complex and conflicted woman, and does so with some success. There are moments when it’s exhilarating to be immersed in the 1920s with Great Gatsby author F. Scott Fitzgerald (David Hoflin) and his wife/muse (a fierce, focused Christina Ricci).
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jen Chaney
    While you watch--which you will, since this show is addictive--it’s as if Riverdale is growing up fast before our eyes, like a clever, winking teenager who’s already grown-up enough to know she should keep her deepest secrets to herself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jen Chaney
    The energetic and musically talented cast elevates the project by several notches. ... It’s weirdly not detailed enough--Brown’s relationship with Houston is barely acknowledged, and, dammit, they don’t even show one second of the “Cool It Now” video being filmed--and too bloated for its own good, especially in its overly padded third act.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jen Chaney
    There is little motivation to keep track of it all, partly because creators Rob and Peter Blackie, who co-wrote two of the season’s six episodes, and Brad Peyton (San Andreas), who directed the first two, hopscotch so often from place to place and moment to moment that it becomes challenging to settle into or invest in any aspect of the story.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jen Chaney
    The series has such a strong command of tone and pacing that, like any good con artist, it persuades you to overlook the parts that might not add up.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    It’s a perfectly fine series, and offers much for fans of historical drama to savor, including heavy doses of romance; costumes rife with voluminous skirts and elaborate tiaras; political and dramatic intrigue; the subtext of actual events, with which, naturally, some liberties have been taken.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    You’re better off spreading out the Unfortunate Events, the same way you did when you read these stories as a child, or perhaps when you read them now with your own kids.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Jen Chaney
    Viewing it is therapeutic and wonderful, but also like going through an additional step in the stages of grief.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jen Chaney
    Absurd yet undeniably diverting NBC series.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Jen Chaney
    It is extraordinary. ... The whole experience is so absorbing that I now regret having made my top TV shows of 2016 list so early in December. The OA belongs, if not in my top ten, then certainly highly ranked among the honorable mentions.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Jen Chaney
    Star is a lot of different things that add up to little that’s worth the time investment. After a few episodes, you may be inclined to reach the same conclusion that Big Boi, who makes a cameo appearance in episode three, eventually does: “You know what? Too much drama, I’m outta here.”
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jen Chaney
    This show and Bernal exude so much warmth and zest for life that both are a pleasure to watch. That continues to be true in season three.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Jen Chaney
    With so much TV to watch right now, surely you can do better than this. The world is big, my friends, and there’s a lot more to explore in it than Mariah Carey doing her best attempt at a Keeping Up With the Kardashians knock-off.

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