Jessica Kiang

Select another critic »
For 300 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jessica Kiang's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Foxcatcher
Lowest review score: 25 A Long Way Down
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 300
300 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    The pathos of this situation is clear, the stakes, which obviously involve genocide, justice and actual Nazis, are sky high and Plummer is completely extraordinary. So why on earth isn't Remember a better film?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    Gitai rightly trusts in the fascination of material that needs no sensationalism or gimmickry to command our whole attention.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Lolo features long stretches of perhaps her most accomplished and enjoyable character-comedy yet. But as often with filmmakers for whom a certain register comes almost too easily, Delpy seems impatient with herself and her facility for spiky, verbal sparring and pithy self-deprecating put-downs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    The real war of A War is waged within Claus, with Lindholm's camera trained mercilessly on Asbæk as he delivers yet another faultlessly committed performance, within a large ensemble in which every performer feels note-perfect.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    In Jackson Heights serves to remind us that our worlds are full of living things, and that, being the social creatures we are, we need each other.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    Vigas' grip is so tight that even if you do get to the heart of his meaning, there's a chance it will have had the life squeezed out of it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    It's Arquimedes who emerges as the film's most indelible character, aided by Francella's fabulously icy performance. Lacking even the warmth of a Don Vito, Arquimedes comes across not as a man who does everything for his family, but as a man who expects his family to do everything, even damn themselves, for him and his twisted, heartless, self-centered worldview.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Alternating immense bombast with long stretches of longueur in its psychologically questionable evocation of the formative years of a future despot, the film is formally confident, stylistically inventive and intensely irritating.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    Its few saving graces are some decent shot-making, a rather great score and the loveliness of its lead actors' faces.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    De Palma is a joy: a hit of garrulous cinephile cocaine so pure you want to do a Tony Montana, fall face-first into it and inhale it all in one go.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    Its very wonkiness is one of the things that makes A Bigger Splash a good time — the sense of a filmmaker, perhaps aware that the story he's telling is not terribly deep or philosophically provocative, allowing himself to go off the rails every now and then in how he's telling it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    Right up until the film’s very closing moments, in which the carefully maintained tension and tone snaps under the ratchet of one melodramatic turn too many, it is not just an absorbing performance piece, but a film of real directorial confidence and flair.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    The fact is that both actors are very good, even if trapped in the amber of Hooper's overweeningly tasteful direction.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    There is nothing underneath the glossy surface and no real insight into what made this man tick — and despite how creepy he looks here, Bulger was a man, not a devil.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    It's the best film McCarthy has ever made: restrained, intelligent and grown-up, but unfolding with the pacing and rhythm of a thriller.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    Matching Fukunaga's proven storytelling grace with a story truly worth the telling, the result is explosively authentic and yet lyrical, making an utterly inhumane and alien situation both completely real and completely abstract.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Salvatore Totino's crisp 3D photography and Kormakur's way with a clear, fluid, thrilling action sequence show off the mountain in immensely impressive ways. But the humans involved get short shrift.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    It has warmth, it has flashes of insight, it even has moments of wit, all it really lacks is edge — which it lacks in large, whopping, huge amounts.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    There's a kind of helpless humility to the presentation of these urban impressions, almost a kind of democracy, that allows you to engage as much or as little as you like with them.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    Devolving into clodhopping heavyhandedness...Stations of the Cross tackles a weighty, complex subject in simple-minded fashion.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    When it reveals its true colors late on, as less of an examination of a rarefied lifestyle and more of an ancient story of brotherhood broken and remade, the cumulative power of all those observed moments comes through.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    It's a resonant, atmospheric horror film that treats its genre and its audience with unusual respect, before escalating in its last moments to a brilliantly uncompromised finale.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    A Hard Day is a film that sets itself fairly narrow ambitions, achieves all of them and then some and yet has no pretensions to importance, weightiness or artistic self-expression.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    Mr. Holmes is not so much the story of Holmes' last case, as the story of his last choice: whether to go gentle, or whether to rage against the dying of the light.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    It is slow and it is ambiguous but it is supremely sure of itself, as it moves, with singleminded grace from chilly to all-out chilling.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Lindon's performance is so perfectly judged, so inspiring of an avalanche of sympathy and empathy without ever seeking it out, that we are on Thierry's side immediately, feeling every slight and every instance of condescension perhaps even more strongly than he does himself.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    Without the spiky irony of Flynn's first-person writing (the enjoyable Jim Thompson-esque noirisms that pepper the novel, like "I have a meanness in me, real as an organ" occur only rarely) Paquet-Brenner shears the text of any richness, to have it unfold instead in a relentlessly grim manner, less intriguing and evocative than straight-up dour.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    It isn't really about the people as much as about the pictures, and for once that does not seem to be a trade off that compromises the power of the resulting film at all.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    It may be a hugely tacky, cartoony balloon pit of a film, but when every single element is dialled up to eleven and you can't go thirty seconds without another three-way face-off between OTT, OMG and WTF, it starts to achieve a maximalist artistry that almost feels avant-garde. At least that's my story and I'm sticking to it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Aided by intensely committed performances from a uniformly brilliant cast, all fielding Scottish accents, Kurzel's genius is to be able to find clean lines of dramatic connection and motivation within the existing text and then to interpret those imaginatively, without becoming simplistic and without compromise.

Top Trailers