Jessica Kiang

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For 326 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jessica Kiang's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Lowest review score: 25 The Best Offer
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 10 out of 326
326 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    Amy
    It's a gripping and thoroughly effective, perhaps even brilliant piece of biographical documentary filmmaking.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 33 Jessica Kiang
    It's not funny enough to be a comedy, not well plotted enough to be a thriller but it's also not smart enough to be an actual exploration of all or even any of the many philosophies it, and Abe Lucas, espouses.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    The Connection feels at best like a cover version of the classic American crime films of the 1970s, and at worst like so much glossily mounted karaoke.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    It's quite difficult to hate 5 Flights Up as much as a project this pointless and trite deserves, because of the attractive playing of the central pair. Keaton and Freeman share absolutely zero sexual chemistry, but watching them twinkle at each other and ruefully indulge each other's tiny mood swings is an experience so aggressively engineered for adorability it becomes hypnotic.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Too transitory and too undemanding to be termed a mindfuck, for Reality minditch seems about right, and it's one you even occasionally get the pleasure of scratching.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Aloft and its icy landscapes and feel of gently dropping barometric pressure can only distract so far from what is essentially an overwrought melodrama that here and there tips over into heavy-handedness despite the restrained beauty of its images.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    Erlingsson has delivered an attractive slice of Icelandic oddness that confirms many of the cliches about that country’s offbeat outlook, but in a good way.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Marfa Girl is not going to convince Clark’s detractors, nor will it disappoint his fans, as most of what people consider his trademarks are in place.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    The film's own spin toward a liberal audience means it chokes into ineffectuality when it tries to take a less ironic and more active stance on society's biggest current white whale, because the persuasive sermon it preaches, it preaches exclusively to the choir.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    '71
    ‘71 is more than just a performance showcase, delivering a gripping, at times almost unbearably tense, incredibly involving anti-war statement, made the stronger for being set against the less cinematically familiar backdrop of Belfast in the year 1971.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    This first section is so charming and well-observed, and creates such real chemistry between the two terrific leads, that it's almost a shame that it's there to invest us in them just so the fast-paced genre flick to come has an anchor.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    The current of informed anger, directed at those who stand by while injustice and bigotry flourish, is unmistakable and turns the whole film into a kind of clever folk fable-cum-protest song.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    Where Jacquot largely knows what he's doing on a micro-level within individual scenes, and the sets and costuming are pretty special, he seems unable to assemble the parts into a coherent, consistent whole. So the film meanders and hiccups.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Jessica Kiang
    A movie so simple, so elegant, and yet so devouringly empathetic that you might not notice its full magic until a few hours later.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    This is one slow-ass "novel," in which no one ever cracks a joke and potentially melodramatic moments (a fairground ride collapse, the initial accident, a suicide attempt) are so painstakingly crafted to avoid splashiness that any momentum is killed. A little splashiness would have been most welcome.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Jessica Kiang
    Is it fair to make Woman in Gold representative of the failings of the whole historical-true-story-designed-to-remind-an-older-skewing-middle-class-white-audience-that-people-have-triumphed-over-adversity genre? Perhaps not, but as one of its most egregious and fallacious examples, it's as good a line to draw in the sand as any.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Jessica Kiang
    Without overly romanticizing it or suggesting that, ultimately, it is anything more than a business built around the talents of some very singular men, Sunada's film becomes a love letter of a most unusual kind, because it is addressed to a place that is unremarkable in every way except for the spirit that flowed through it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    With no sheen of reflexivity, and no in-jokey admission of its hokiness to hide behind, can this non-ironic un-re-invention possibly work? Actually, yes it can, and does surprisingly well, by approaching the story with a sincerity and sweetness that defy cynicism, and by casting Cate Blanchett.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    An insightful, enjoyable, absorbing ride that stands as a testament to its director's lively, ungovernable storytelling imagination.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    It looks pretty, and is visually often a creditable recreation of times past, but it gives no substance to Stock and Dean's relationship, just circumstances. It lacks life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    Formally, it is even more abstract than previous Malick efforts, with on-camera dialogue kept to the barest minimum and the cast instead contributing poetic, banal or philosophical voiceover to the soundtrack, lines which overlap, fade up and fade down into music and silence, contributing to the sense of the film as a philosophical fugue state.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    It's such a disappointment when you consider the wild portraits of pioneers that Herzog has given us before, that he's so reverent here. Isn't he the director who can locate the madness in everything he sees? Where is Bell's madness?
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    The inescapably precious Still Life doesn’t deal in anything as truthful, complex and difficult as empathy; its only currency is pity, and that is the basest coin of all.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Shot in pedestrian fashion, it is set in an intriguing and entirely foreign milieu, but the film ends up just too inscrutable and oblique for us to really engage with it, or its often incomprehensibly motivated characters.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Unfortunately Things People Do scuppers its own chances by having people do things we just don't ever, ever believe they would.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    An irreproachably tasteful, easily digestible but an unsurprising, undemanding watch.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    As a director, Colangelo has a firm if cautious grasp on the material, but as a writer her grip is less sure.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    A film which for the most part is enervatingly classic in format: stately, reverential despite the conflicting accounts the various narrators give of Hong's motivations, and often quite dull, despite its focus not on her work or talent but on the more salacious and controversial aspects of her personal life.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Jessica Kiang
    Whatever flaws it has are ones of over-enthusiasm and over-ambition and are therefore easy to forgive, especially because when it works, it really works.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Perversely episodic, strangely empty, and unfolding in a series of beautifully composed but static wide shots (giving us the unusual experience of literally yearning for a close-up), the film is a test of patience.

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