Jessica Kiang
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For 128 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jessica Kiang's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 45 Years
Lowest review score: 25 Beauty and the Beast
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 86 out of 128
  2. Negative: 7 out of 128
128 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    Erlingsson has delivered an attractive slice of Icelandic oddness that confirms many of the cliches about that country’s offbeat outlook, but in a good way.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    The film is undeniably moving at times, and there are moments of metatextual elegance that feel as though they tremble on the brink of genuine insight.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    We can't help but feel that by comparison with the meaty and compelling issues he takes on so fearlessly, so scabrously in the other entries, Paradise: Hope ends up somewhat toothless.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    Some occasionally awkward performance moments aside, though, the film is very compassionate towards its characters and finds just about enough original insight within the well-worn family drama genre to keep things from feeling too familiar—it’s a just a shame there couldn’t have been a little more vitality injected early on.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Jessica Kiang
    Formally, it is even more abstract than previous Malick efforts, with on-camera dialogue kept to the barest minimum and the cast instead contributing poetic, banal or philosophical voiceover to the soundtrack, lines which overlap, fade up and fade down into music and silence, contributing to the sense of the film as a philosophical fugue state.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    A hard film to hate, but an even harder one to defend, Joe Dante’s throwback zombie comedy Burying the Ex is a completely unreconstructed B-movie that is perfectly happy to breeze by on charm, nostalgia and the attractiveness of its leads.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    When it comes to capturing some of the gonzo, amoral, substance-fueled verve that Welsh’s novels can display, Filth can take the silver medal with its head held relatively high.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    The Bastards feels like what happens when an undeniably great filmmaker stoops to sensationalism -- it’s a smarter, odder film than someone else would make with the same material, but it’s still smart, odd sensationalism.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Gondry’s film is really a huge Rube Goldberg machine, full of lights and buzzers and levers that ping and whistle endearingly but are connected to nothing and serve no greater function in the larger apparatus.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    The film's own spin toward a liberal audience means it chokes into ineffectuality when it tries to take a less ironic and more active stance on society's biggest current white whale, because the persuasive sermon it preaches, it preaches exclusively to the choir.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    An enigmatic and perhaps occasionally overly deferential documentary about one of the all-time great character actors, Sophie Huber’s Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction, is slow out of the gate, but gently, ever so gently, builds to a thoughtful portrait of a thoughtful man.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Niccol’s film takes a somber, nuanced and compelling look at the War on Terror as it is waged by U.S. drone pilots, right up until a final five minutes that, in a shower of pat resolutions and conclusions, delivers something of a surgical strike on the its credibility.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    While tears will be jerked, heartstrings plucked and throats enlumpened, it has to go down as a disappointment in the director’s catalogue.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Overloaded with too many ideas, it does scant justice to the more interesting ones that crop up, while regularly diverting from any sort of central narrative to follow tenuous and ill-explained threads that end up in a foggy limbo. But just when it threatens to wholly frustrate, someone cracks an enjoyable inside-baseball meta movie-making joke and we're back on side for a bit.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Jodorowsky throws everything and several kitchen sinks into the film, yet it all has its place, and the overall effect is not of the headachey mess it would be in anyone else’s hands, but of a kind of joyous, absurdist melange of highbrow concepts, personal memoir and potty humor.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Marfa Girl is not going to convince Clark’s detractors, nor will it disappoint his fans, as most of what people consider his trademarks are in place.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Nebraska is a small-scale quixotic adventure about the importance of dreams, no matter how pie-eyed, in which the outlined flaws could all be forgiven, if it just went somewhere a bit more surprising.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    This film feels like one you discover late at night and watch for ten minutes before remembering you've already seen it, and yet we still kinda loved it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    They may inspire near-religious fervour in some parts, but when it works, Made of Stone doesn’t tell the story of The Stone Roses’ resurrection or Second Coming as much as of their second chance: to play together; to reward the faith of their doggedly loyal fanbase; to be adored.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    All of Wong's undeniable visual flair can't conceal the haphazard nature of the story.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    The odd rhythm of very fast and slick followed by very slow and arty is difficult to settle into, and the film ultimately frustrates, willfully obscuring the apparatus of what appears at first to be a promising film noir framework.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    Abel Ferrara’s Pasolini is a frustrating film, despite vast stretches of compelling storytelling.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    A film of surface pleasures, even joys, but those joys seem to be longing for a central idea around which to coalesce.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    It looks pretty, and is visually often a creditable recreation of times past, but it gives no substance to Stock and Dean's relationship, just circumstances. It lacks life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    It’s a meticulous and tightly coiled cautionary tale, but it’s hard to imagine any of its characters having life outside the narrow confines of its stagy plot, or the edges of its carefully composed frames.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Jessica Kiang
    As a director, Colangelo has a firm if cautious grasp on the material, but as a writer her grip is less sure.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    The more dramatic moments feel unanchored to the more farcical, and the humor ranges erratically from scatological to tender/heartwarming and back to cheap shots at slightly uncomfortable stereotypes. "Uneven" would be the kind way of putting it, but "messy" is probably nearer to the truth.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    There are jokes that land, and every time Kathryn Hahn steps on screen the film threatens to tilt on its axis and point toward a truer north.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Unfortunately Things People Do scuppers its own chances by having people do things we just don't ever, ever believe they would.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    An irreproachably tasteful, easily digestible but an unsurprising, undemanding watch.

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