Jessica Kiang
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For 129 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jessica Kiang's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Blue Is the Warmest Color
Lowest review score: 25 The Captive
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 87 out of 129
  2. Negative: 7 out of 129
129 movie reviews
    • 34 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    An irreproachably tasteful, easily digestible but an unsurprising, undemanding watch.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Though it's impressive in many technical and surface ways, The Croods lets us down on the essentials of character and story, and no amount of late-stage father/daughter bonding or vertiginous 3D cliffside tumbling can make up for that.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    A Single Shot does not add up to anywhere near the sum of its parts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    A loving and in fact overly adulatory genre film which is not so much a take on the revenge Western as a deeply faithful recreation of it, at times so faithful as to veer dangerously close to pastiche.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    For every moment of comedy that lands or drama that touches a nerve, there are ten of “why the bloody hell should I bloody care?” or “cry me a river, you had to sell your Brueghel.”
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    It's a sterile affair, no ambiguity, no ambivalence, just people doing one thing and then another.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Aloft and its icy landscapes and feel of gently dropping barometric pressure can only distract so far from what is essentially an overwrought melodrama that here and there tips over into heavy-handedness despite the restrained beauty of its images.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Perversely episodic, strangely empty, and unfolding in a series of beautifully composed but static wide shots (giving us the unusual experience of literally yearning for a close-up), the film is a test of patience.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    A film that, while often beautiful to look at, feels oddly bloodless in execution.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Shot in pedestrian fashion, it is set in an intriguing and entirely foreign milieu, but the film ends up just too inscrutable and oblique for us to really engage with it, or its often incomprehensibly motivated characters.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    Despite Seyfried’s gameness, we come away a little deadened from the experience and knowing precious little more than before about the person who inhabited the body, the life and the throat of Linda Lovelace.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Jessica Kiang
    The film makes distant what surely should be vital and alive.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    Manages to be both overwrought and strangely lacking in drama, staggering under the deadening weight of an uninvolving central character. It is a shame, because many of the elements were in place for something much more compelling.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    Bloodless, far too genteel, and perfectly content to continually tell where a little showing would be nice; Night Train to Lisbon ends up a deeply unadventurous adventure story.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    It’s a heartfelt and undoubtedly well-meaning film, attempting a character study of a woman of an age and lifestyle that makes her an unusual and therefore unusually worthy subject. But Angelique’s overriding characteristic is that she is incapable of fundamental change which makes her at best a frustrating protagonist for this drama.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    Jackie & Ryan is supposedly all about learning how to git where ya gotta go, but none of the characters start or end in particularly interesting places.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    The overwriting of every single discussion smacks less of realistic debate than of a writer/director in the throes of a fit of didacticism who simply never trusts his audience to get his meaning without it being iterated and reiterated to the point of white noise.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    There is beauty here, and exquisite craft in both the pictures and the minutely designed soundscape, and there are some truly chewy ideas thrown up about the porosity of the boundary between public and private that would have lent terrific, atmospheric texture to a film... But there is little connection to the characters.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    The people of Jia’s film are mysterious, their reactions and motivations, outside of that first segment in which we get the best-drawn and therefore most anomalous character, are all but unknowable.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    It's such a disappointment when you consider the wild portraits of pioneers that Herzog has given us before, that he's so reverent here. Isn't he the director who can locate the madness in everything he sees? Where is Bell's madness?
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    With the themes of this play not exactly subtle or delicate, particularly at the climax, it all becomes a bit grating -- inescapable in its heavy-handedness.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    This is one slow-ass "novel," in which no one ever cracks a joke and potentially melodramatic moments (a fairground ride collapse, the initial accident, a suicide attempt) are so painstakingly crafted to avoid splashiness that any momentum is killed. A little splashiness would have been most welcome.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    It’s a competent, unobjectionable history lesson but Cesar Chavez’ legacy needs a more inspired and inspiring telling if it's to get the exposure this crusading figure deserves.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    At best a handful of transitory pleasures, Sils Maria threads through the peaks and valleys of weighty, interesting topics, but makes no lasting impression on them.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Kiang
    It’s a twee and tweedy period “Footloose,” into which Loach’s trademark left wing sympathies are not so much woven as photocopied and stapled onto alternate pages of the script.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    The inescapably precious Still Life doesn’t deal in anything as truthful, complex and difficult as empathy; its only currency is pity, and that is the basest coin of all.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    A film which for the most part is enervatingly classic in format: stately, reverential despite the conflicting accounts the various narrators give of Hong's motivations, and often quite dull, despite its focus not on her work or talent but on the more salacious and controversial aspects of her personal life.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    The story is bloated and episodic (the film's 2h 18m length doesn't help the pacing), and remarkably unengaging for what should be emotionally epic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    It’s handsome, stately and deathly dull.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Jessica Kiang
    Over the twenty-odd years the film covers, Saint Laurent is scene-by-scene depicted as a genius, a manic-depressive, a polyamorist, a drug taker, a mercurial friend, a partier and a terribly, terribly sensitive soul. He undoubtedly was all of these things and more, it's just a pity he doesn't also come across as a person.

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