Jessica Winter
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For 266 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 75% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jessica Winter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 90 Broken Flowers
Lowest review score: 0 Beautiful
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 65 out of 266
  2. Negative: 72 out of 266
266 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    Remains a genial lesson in how to both honor and subvert womanly expectations.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jessica Winter
    Arriving just after the best year for animated film in recent memory, Fantasia 2000 doesn't play like a celebration. In its sentimental yearning for a golden age when another one's upon us, it feels a little like a rebuke.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    A plea for equality of opportunity, a worthy objective somewhat obscured by non-disabled actors occupying the lead roles. In any case, one imagines Rory himself would prefer a Farrelly disability blooper reel.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Day-Lewis is as rooted as an oak in his character and milieu, yet easefully disengaged from the film's pensive histrionics.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Jessica Winter
    Aidan Higgins's novel undergoes a choppy, perplexing script adaptation by Harold Pinter (who enjoys a soused, belligerent cameo), further muddied by non sequitur editing inserts. Imogen and Otto's happenstance affair holds little intrigue or surprise.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 10 Jessica Winter
    Sitting through the last reel is significantly less charming than listening to a four-year-old with a taste for exaggeration recount his Halloween trip to the Haunted House.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    A junk-food movie striving to be nutritious -- it's one of your racier Be Yourself after-school specials crossed with 'Who Moved My Cheese?" for Cosmo girls.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    The appealing leads have strong chemistry, but it's the wrong kind: an affectionate big-brother/little-sister rapport that leaves a discomfiting taint on their more amorous clinches.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Jessica Winter
    Paul Morrison's relentlessly unsurprising staging of a "Romeo and Juliet" story fetishizes its accelerating tragedies with morbid solemnity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    He (Wolens) captures Crayola-vivid images of both the unspoiled forest canopy and denuded expanses of slash-and-burned landscape -- a bleak summation, perhaps, of the area's past and future.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Jessica Winter
    A veteran of commercials and music videos, director Chris Nahon crowds out too much of the sprawling combat gymnastics, but his film doesn't lack for luxuriously seedy ambience --his Paris is a retro-futurist sewer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jessica Winter
    Gainsbourg is virtually incidental to her mate's screeching navel-serenade, which maintains a stranglehold on the declarative first-person mode of its title.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jessica Winter
    Comes down to two sorely limited and rapidly tiresome characters.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    This sly, engrossing doc is an expert riposte to smug proponents of the fetterless free market.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Two Men is slow and sweet as warm pudding, but Cranham and Derek Jacobi (as one of Churchill's intelligence officers) both add a generous, wholehearted gravitas the film might have thought to ask for in the first place.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jessica Winter
    A genuine consciousness-raiser, but it's less a social-realist narrative than a high-volume rally.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Jessica Winter
    Ledger's deadpan baritone pumps wit into his tepid one-liners like collagen into a wilted starlet's kisser, and the clumsy staging might not grate so much if the tone weren't so self-congratulatory.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Dark Blue World and Sverak's previous "Kolya" were each written by the director's father, Zdenek, and both films betray a weakness for the symmetrical and sentimental.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jessica Winter
    The film is so grindingly predictable that I was writing out a full plot synopsis in my notebook before it was half over, though the thick grains of Terry Stacey's photography and Deschanel's understated performance add a little kick to the family-dysfunction paces, and Ferrell's dive-bar rendition of the Eagles' "I Can't Tell You Why" is positively riveting. Winter Passing should have been a musical.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    If Moon Shadow does sometimes overcome its sentimentalism and faulty parallels, it's because the film is altogether unburdened by cynicism.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jessica Winter
    Having already looted the Peckinpah and spaghetti-western archives, the director now quotes his own quotations, in service of not a sequel but a vociferous reiteration.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    A handsome, mostly tasteful production on par with 2001's Bayley-Murdoch impersonation "Iris."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    There are pages missing from this fable: Meadows reports that his financiers asked him to cut one-quarter of his original script just before production began, and his fondness for long takes sits uneasily beside the apparent gaps in the narrative.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Dinosaur amounts to 80 minutes of discouraged Cretaceous trudging, punctuated by the occasional fight or stampede and one pyrotechnic coup: a truly thrilling meteor shower.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jessica Winter
    The film marks a welcome departure from the usual rah-rah machismo of the semi-nationalist action adventure, but Jordan never escapes the mighty shadow of "The Thin Red Line"--from the grace-note inserts of exotic birds, snakes, and foliage to Ledger's laconic, sometimes haiku-like voice-over to Klaus Badelt's embarrassingly Zimmer-derivative score.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Bursting with grotesque burlesques of household relations.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jessica Winter
    The last scene reads like an admission of defeat.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    There's so little leavening humor here, and so much physical and emotional violence visited upon the already abject, that the film seems as pointless as the wasted lives it purports to examine.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Money can't buy happiness, but as Bride and Prejudice teaches us, it can get patience in bulk from a smart young woman of a practical mind-set.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Jessica Winter
    Blends past and present to draw some utterly stupefying parallels.

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