Jessica Winter
Select another critic »
For 266 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 75% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jessica Winter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 90 Shanghai Noon
Lowest review score: 0 Deuces Wild
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 65 out of 266
  2. Negative: 72 out of 266
266 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The director has a fitfully deployed gift for droll humor, but Chutney Popcorn mostly provides evidence that the ins and outs of the improvised multiparent family can be as prosaic as the nuclear Eisenhower model.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Two Men is slow and sweet as warm pudding, but Cranham and Derek Jacobi (as one of Churchill's intelligence officers) both add a generous, wholehearted gravitas the film might have thought to ask for in the first place.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Lovely to look at but insipid.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The poised Vega and pleasingly phlegmatic Sabara are resolutely uncute performers, and the reach-out-and-touch-it gadgetry carries a homey scent of proactive nostalgia. Spy Kids 2 is an island of lost Circuit Cities.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The contortional physical shtick familiar from Lawrence's sitcom, laden with a dollop of Three Stooges violence, should keep the boys happy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    A handsome, mostly tasteful production on par with 2001's Bayley-Murdoch impersonation "Iris."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    Unfolds as a series of slightly disjointed vignettes, padded with redundant voiceover and an oppressively histrionic score.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jessica Winter
    The Business of Strangers goes too far in dramatizing Julie's primal, Paula-fied surge of female fury, and the script finally mistakes respectful ambiguity for vaporous drift.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Though Wilson gives a customarily sympathetic, engaged, and unpredictable performance, his work is drowned out by pyrotechnics and orchestral paroxysms of patriotism.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Largely inept and weirdly endearing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Begs the question: Did the lads from Squatney trail the zeitgeist at every turn, or were cobandleaders David St. Hubbins and Nigel Tufnel simply in touch with their past and ahead of their time?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Mackenzie and Marber opt for an anonymous viewpoint of clinical detachment, which generates about the same psychodramatic tension as reading the "DSM-IV."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    A junk-food movie striving to be nutritious -- it's one of your racier Be Yourself after-school specials crossed with 'Who Moved My Cheese?" for Cosmo girls.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Handheld sprinting and swish-pans try to enliven the duo's shenanigans: undermotivated fisticuffs, fun with the nutty controls on their limousine (the roof slides open!), Vaughn's endless yapping.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    We get a bunch of straight actors focusing on the "gayness" of their characters, mincing and lisping and melodramatically breaking nails, all in the besmirched name of tolerance.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Martin seems uncomfortable and oddly waxen (the orange Al Gore makeup doesn't help), injecting Frank with neither restless anger nor wry humor.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Amid the awkward pacing and gaping plot holes, the film's chief point of interest is Goldblum's morbidly fascinating performance: equal parts Walter Neff and Captain Kirk.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    The Edukators smiles indulgently as the kids rage belatedly against the dying of the SDS light.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Begins and ends with footage of FDR intoning "I hate war," something the film takes two interminable hours to say.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Depp and Highmore's final scene together strikes a muted blow of desolation -- bottomless but just bearable -- that Forster rather bravely lets stand as the last word on all the fanciful solace that Barrieland had to offer.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Pacino simply wipes the cobblestones with the rest of the cast: His beautifully calibrated performance is lucid, commanding, and genuinely tragic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    A happy ending is never at issue here -- it's clear where she's going, but there's little clue where she's been.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Though it often wallows in louche baroque textures, The Golden Bowl is perhaps the most visually accomplished of the Ivory soaps.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    In lieu of vaporous message-mongering, the languid, episodic narrative -- centering on hapless sadsack Quoyle (Spacey) -- streams along by the gentle force of a convincing melancholic undertow, a dejection and longing that's not so much surmounted as sustained.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    It's dispiriting to watch him (Murphy) stand patiently by and concoct reaction shots for quipping raccoons and dancing bears.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Day-Lewis is as rooted as an oak in his character and milieu, yet easefully disengaged from the film's pensive histrionics.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    Vatel is dull and silly, but the holiday season doesn't offer a better sets-and-costumes workshop.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    A frat-boy remake of "Pink Flamingos" which isn't all bad.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    The overdetermined approach preempts character shadings or social subtext-just compare Hideo Nakata's original "Ring," which tapped its dread from viral-replicant mass culture and its pathos from a broken home, or Nakata's "Dark Water," which channeled the sorrow, guilt, and paranoia felt by a young divorcée mired in a custody battle.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jessica Winter
    The elliptical, even fragmented editing style clashes with the reiterative voice-over, which could indicate a stylistic choice or cutting under duress.

Top Trailers