For 20 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joe Holleman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 88 Lorenzo's Oil
Lowest review score: 25 Bad Boys
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 20
  2. Negative: 3 out of 20
20 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Holleman
    If you're looking for a political message, either for or against U.S. involvement in Afghanistan, this is not your movie. The directors were satisfied with telling us about a group of courageous, honorable young soldiers - a salute these men richly deserve.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Holleman
    There is much to like about this film, good performances and writing, enough true laughs for the comedy label and enough true love to keep the romance fans happy. To top it all off, the soundtrack uses Tony Bennett and Frank Sinatra at all the right moments. Try to leave this movie without humming one of the tunes on the way home. [29 July 1994, p.5F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Holleman
    Everything you would want in a summer action-suspense movie - and just a little bit more. The movie delivers enough thrills to satisfy all but the most hard-core adrenaline addicts. And several touches, especially the lead performance of Harrison Ford, elevate this film above the standard summer suspense offerings.[9 June 1992, p.4D]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Holleman
    School Ties offers a moving and uncompromising look at religious intolerance, narrow-mindedness and hatred. And although this movie is set in a prep school, it has more in common with ''Gentlemen's Agreement'' than with ''Dead Poets Society.'' [19 Sept 1992, p.7D]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Holleman
    Although viewing this movie leaves you raw emotionally, it is a powerful testimony to one family's unwavering love and willpower, captured splendidly by Susan Sarandon, Nick Nolte and director and co-writer George Miller. [27 Jan 1993, p.5G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Holleman
    Depp shows again that he truly understands Thompson by delivering a nuanced performance that is remarkably different, but subliminally similar, from the wonderfully outrageous turn he provided in "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Holleman
    Most of the credit for this successful effort goes to Miller, who simply pointed a camera at Levitch for hours and stayed out of the way. This laid-back direction helps Miller avoid that self-conscious "documentary" seriousness, edgy shots and editing that tells the audience that this is all so very important. [18 Dec 1998, p.E3]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Holleman
    This 19th Bond film has all of the required scenes, lines, gags and gadgets to keep Bond fans pleased - as well as a few new twists to update and energize it. [19 Dec 1997, p.E3]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Holleman
    My Cousin Vinny would have been a moderately funny movie in any case. But with Joe Pesci in the leading role, the movie escalates several notches to a rough-and-tumble, exciting comedy and proves that Pesci is one of the most versatile actors in the business. [19 Mar 1992, p.6E]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Holleman
    More damaging is Lurie's conspicuous "red state" rant, as he makes sure that every prominent guy in this film - save for the screenwriter and the black sheriff - fits all of the Southern stereotypes. That doesn't make it a bad movie, just one that is something less than Peckinpah's original.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Holleman
    With a deadly slow beginning and an unnecessary overload of special effects, this sequel is incredibly average, doubling the number of explosions and cinematic tricks, but cutting back on story, plot and characters. [24 May 2000, p.E4]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Holleman
    It's not quite up to, or maybe down to, the level of the first two movies. But the movie rolls to a wildly funny climax at the Oscar presentations, where Drebin is mistaken for Phil Donahue. Surely, there are enough belly laughs and knee slaps to make this film worth your time. And stop calling me Shirley. [23 Mar 1994, p.6F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Holleman
    CB4
    The movie has some outstanding moments. Rock's performance and writing show that he appreciates rap music and its place in the culture, but he is not so respectful that he is incapable of skewering it. The movie's failings show up in the last half hour. Tamra Davis, known for directing many top music videos, lapses into predictability. The edge in the first part of the film goes dull by picture's end. And the story, written by Rock, Nelson George and Robert LoCash, becomes needlessly complicated, then meanders to a conclusion. [17 Mar 1993, p.3F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Joe Holleman
    The real disappointment is that director Carroll Ballard delivers such powerful racing scenes and seascapes that you wish he could have done better on dry land. But you can't argue that Ballard doesn't deliver an original, often breathtaking, view of nature. [17 Sep 1992, p.4E]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Holleman
    It would have been nice if Cowboys & Aliens had come come up with the right equation to balance originality and homage. But in the end, it all turned into trigonometry.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Holleman
    All that complexity backfires at about the midpoint, leaving viewers with a standard yarn about a popular guy who makes a grossly insensitive wager after his trophy girlfriend drops him. After that, it is all a case of "been there, done that." [29 Jan 1999,p. E3]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Holleman
    A superficial glimpse at the man who symbolizes some of the most heroic and shameful aspects of Western heritage. Depardieu is fine as the explorer, and Weaver, Armand Assante and Fernando Rey are solid in support. But the writing never surpasses average and the exchanges on the above-mentioned issues come off sounding like a junior-high debate class or, worse yet, 15-second sound bites from political candidates. [09 Oct 1992, p.3G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Joe Holleman
    Ted
    Ted does not only break before it ends. It snaps back so violently that it very well may knock out of your mind any recollection that the movie is fairly entertaining for about 30 minutes.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Joe Holleman
    This film fails, and for several reasons - not the least being that movies about bickering police partners who fight crime with snappy wisecracks and serious weaponry just might be the most overused plot of the last 15 years. [12 April 1995, p.3E]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Joe Holleman
    THE BODYGUARDS for the people who made The Bodyguard should be fired - because they should have thrown their clients to the ground and held them there until their desire to make this movie went away. [30 Nov 1992, p.3D]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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