Joe Morgenstern

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For 2,250 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joe Morgenstern's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Gravity
Lowest review score: 0 Killer Joe
Score distribution:
2250 movie reviews
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Todd Graff's would-be inspirational film lift their voices in song that makes you smile, and squander their voices on dialogue that makes you cringe (but also smile in oddly pleasurable disbelief).
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Another is how the film manages, in the absence of a coherent plot, to be so funny and engaging until, somewhere around the midpoint, it goes as flat as a stepped-on creepy-crawly.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    The movie's real star is the cinematographer, Elliot Davis -- his images carry more emotional freight than all the performances put together.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    It's thanks to her (Leoni) that we stay tuned to Mr. Allen's comic premise long after it has gone from delightfully outrageous to off-puttingly preposterous.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    It’s billionaire-glossy, as much an ode to consumerism as a study in sadomasochism; intermittingly titillating, with fugitive flashes of droll; and, bondage apart, a dutifully romantic tale of an old-fashioned girl who takes a particularly roundabout route to true love.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    In case you were holding your breath, Renée Zellweger's Bridget Jones is still sweetly earnest, chronically overweight and swinging once again from lovestruck to lovelorn.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    World Trade Center shows us many things we already know, though with impressive flair, then plunges underground for an unconvincing drama based on a multitude of facts. It's upbeat, all right, but badly off kilter.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Very funny and surprisingly likable until it goes Hollywood.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    The violence wears you down. Like one of its nutso characters, Seven Psychopaths has a death wish.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Firth gives his all, and then some. He’s very funny, even touching, when the material allows him to be. Yet the production, directed by Matthew Vaughn (“Kick-Ass,” “X-Men: First Class”) from a screenplay he wrote with Jane Goldman, can’t contain its centrifugal force.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Pleasing moments don't add up to a feature film, even though this one strives desperately for substance and coherence by slathering its slender story with treacly family values.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Coogan, lavishly talented as a comic, and a comic actor, is fairly monotonous in the mostly serious role he wrote for himself. That leaves Ms. Dench to carry the picture, which she does, up to a point, with her usual delicacy and grace.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Like "Transformers," which it rivals in relentlessness, Battleship comes with its own force field, a furious energy that renders criticism irrelevant.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    The main — and for my money only — attraction in Le Week-End, which was directed by Roger Michell, is the marvelous Scottish actress Lindsay Duncan. She is witty, fiercely intelligent and intensely sexy in the role of Meg, a woman stuck in a failing marriage.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    The film is enjoyable enough, at least for young children.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Declarative sentences are as scarce as detectable feelings in this stylish, emptyish thriller -- it's Tarantino with the vital juices left out.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Fur starts stylishly, and confidently, but the film dwindles down to a chamber piece in a claustrophobic chamber. Enter at your own risk.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    The star of this fantasy adventure for young audiences is a charmer from the moment she is hatched (from a huge blue egg that starts to rock like a Mexican jumping bean). Her name is Saphira, she speaks with the voice of Rachel Weisz, and it doesn't matter that she's too young to breathe fire -- at first -- or that she waddles a bit on the ground, because she lives and breathes the joy of flight, which is exactly what was missing from most of Harry Potter's solos on a broom.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    After two flat-out triumphs in a row, "All About My Mother" in 1999 and last year's breathtaking "Talk To Her," Pedro Almodóvar hasn't done it again. Yet lesser Almodóvar -- in this instance "Bad Education" -- is better than most of the movies we see.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    If only the showmanship were equal to the scholarship. As beautiful as the film is (despite notable variations in the quality of the cinematography), it is also sluggish, underdramatized after that initial suspense, and for the most part emotionally remote.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    It's a lovely pretext for dazzling visuals, yet the production is diminished by the clumsiness of an 8-bit script.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Pretty bad, and pretty funny.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    The narrative engine leaves the rails when Irving, like Hughes, plunges into paranoia (though Irving actually is the object of a high-level plot) and the style turns to the sort of intensely manipulated surrealism that Charlie Kaufman practiced, not successfully, in "Confessions of a Dangerous Mind."
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Impressive landscapes, plus Kristen Wiig's appealing Cheryl, the fellow worker who inflames Walter's passion, make the movie enjoyable enough. Yet its style is a constant bafflement.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    One unwelcome surprise is how shopworn the story's components prove to be. Still, they're enhanced if not redeemed by Mr. Washington's stirring portrait of a skillful, prideful pilot hitting bottom.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Any meaningful perspective on the greedfest of the period is obscured by the gleefulness of the depiction.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    The technology is seamless, the movements are eloquent and the problem may be my own misprogramming, but the robot still looked to me like a man in a robot suit.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    It's formula stuff, to be sure, but full of feeling for the sweep of the past as well as for the unsettled, yearning present.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    Visually Hugo is a marvel, but dramatically it's a clockwork lemon.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Joe Morgenstern
    The drama is almost stillborn, thanks to a slow, deadly dull romantic preface, and it’s subverted by incessant switching between spectacular struggles on the Atlantic and generic anxieties on shore.

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