Joe Morgenstern

Select another critic »
For 2,213 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joe Morgenstern's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Carrie
Lowest review score: 0 Jupiter Ascending
Score distribution:
2213 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    As Crowhurst's situation grows desperate, the scope of the film expands -- from a good yarn to a haunting, complex tale of self-promotion, media madness, self-delusion and, finally, self-destruction.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    From seductive start to shattering finish, the film is as stirring, entertaining and steadfastly thrilling as it is beautiful.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This is not a drama of shadings, but of ever-increasing intensity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    In the end, though, the success of American Gangster doesn't flow from the originality of its ideas, or its bid for epic status, as much as from its craftsmanship and confident professionalism. It's a great big gangster film, and a good one.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    I can't begin to count the ways in which The Savages pleased me, but the very best of them is the way Tamara Jenkins's comedy stays tough while sneakily turning tender.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It's a comedy of crisp, mordant wit and quietly radiating warmth, as well as a coming-of-age story with a lovely twist -- you can't always spot the best candidates for maturity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It declines to take itself seriously, yet manages, sometimes simultaneously, to be exciting, instructive, cheerfully absurd and genuinely affecting.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The heroes are two hit men, and the tone is often absurdist. But the film is also very funny and surprisingly affecting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    As you watch Doc Paskowitz perform for Mr. Pray's camera, it's hard not to judge him harshly. His narcissism seems boundless, even when he cloaks it in self-deprecation.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    On screen it looks crazed, but the comic energy is huge, if indiscriminate, and Mr. Sandler's performance -- think Topol doing Charles Boyer -- can be as delicate as it is gleefully vulgar or grotesque.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This autobiographical meditation is seductively funny, as well as deliciously strange, and hauntingly beautiful, as well as stream-of-consciousness cockeyed.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A bright little screwball comedy that speaks for the vitality of new movies.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The movie's main appeal is its special comic flavor -- a zesty fusion of picaresque adventure, absurdist whimsy and Chaplinesque grace.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This ostensibly simple film evokes whole lives in 96 minutes, and does so with sparse dialogue.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The life that swirls around Kym before, during and after her sister's densely populated, wonderfully detailed wedding seems to have been caught on the fly in all its sweetness, sadness and joy. (In its free-form style the film constitutes an elaborate homage to Robert Altman.)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A remarkably fine and genuinely frightening movie about a teenage vampire.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    More than acting, though, Penn's performance is a marvelous act of empathy in a movie that, for all its surprisingly conventional style, measures up to its stirring subject.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    In a minimalist film of muted emotions, Michelle Williams gives as lovely a performance as a moviegoer could ask for.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Doubt leaves none in one respect: John Patrick Shanley was the right person to direct this fascinating screen version of his celebrated play.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It's a meditation, as affecting as it is entertaining, on the limits of violence and the power of unchained empathy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Director, Darren Aronofsky, and the writer, Robert D. Siegel, have turned the story of this washed-up faux gladiator into a film of authentic beauty and commanding consequence.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The malignity can be oppressive -- this is a far cry from Fellini finding poignant uplift in the slums -- but the dramatic structure is complex, the details are instructive, and the sense of tragedy is momentous.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Seldom has a film explored such exotica as Valentino's world -- the gowns, the galas, the villas, the private jets -- with such a sense of momentous drama behind the glitz.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Earth eloquently shows the struggle, life doing what it must to sustain life. The spectacle is stirring.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Wright and his colleagues have made a movie with a spaciousness of its own, a brave willingness to explore such mysteries of the mind and heart as the torture that madness can inflict, and the rapture that music can confer. Bravo to all concerned.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What's so affecting about him in the film, though, is that he doesn't seem monstrous at all. To the contrary, Iron Mike, having meted out epic suffering in the ring and other venues, seems to be a man who has suffered genuinely, even terribly, in the course of a life that he never believed would last 40 years.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Spielmann's film is full of surprises and, in its distinctive way, full of life.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Cuarón directs with a hand that's as sure as it is deft. The music is terrific, though I can't say the same for the fusty subtitles, and Adam Kimmel's cinematography bathes the movie's cheerful absurdities in a beautiful glow.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    In a literal sense this delightful film, in Norwegian with English subtitles, is about retirement and the prospect of loss. But Mr. Hamer, a poet of the droll and askew, sends the aptly named Odd--it's also a common Norwegian name--on a cockeyed journey from regret through comic confusion to a lovely eagerness for new adventures.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Much of Summer Hours, which was shot by the excellent Eric Gautier, feels like a Chekhov play and resonates like a Schubert quartet; it’s a work of singular loveliness.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    For all its awkward structure, the film is heartfelt and deeply affecting.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Period pieces can be marvelous or musty, depending on the period, as well as the piece. Soul Power is marvelous.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Between the two performances there's not a false note. Between the father and son there's an unbreakable bond. Though civilization has ended, love and parental duty shape the course of this fable, which is otherwise as heartwarming as a Beckett play shorn of humor.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Like earlier Dardenne films, Lorna’s Silence is naturalistic, yet this one, beautifully shot in 35 mm film by Alain Marcoen, achieves a poetry of bereftness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A survey of the week wouldn't be complete without a left-handed salute--not to be confused with a backhanded compliment--to the gleeful rubbish of Not Quite Hollywood: The Wild, Untold Story of Ozploitation!
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Coco is played by Audrey Tautou, and she's phenomenal--self-contained, tightly focused, sparing with her smiles, miserly with her joy, often guarded to the point of severity, yet giving off a grave radiance at every moment she's in front of the camera.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The sparkle is what's been missing in the star's (Cage) recent performances. What's not to love in a movie that transmutes Terence's moral squalor, and the squalid state of post-Katrina New Orleans, into darkly comic gold?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Almodóvar's love of movies informs every frame of this beautiful film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A win-win situation in which a mainstream feature works equally well as stirring entertainment and a history lesson about a remarkable convergence of sports and statesmanship.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The entire film is a seduction, one that draws us into a vanished world where Count Leo Tolstoy and his wife of 48 years, Countess Sofya, come to joyous, tempestuous life in a matched pair of magnificent performances by Christopher Plummer and Helen Mirren.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The carnival is loud, brash, brassy, sexy and sometimes tacky or silly, but always entertaining.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A severe and eerily beautiful German-language drama.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A stylish thriller with real complexity, people with interesting faces, a sensational actress cast as an ambisexual Goth hacker heroine--the news about The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo is nothing but good.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This faux-documentary is droll, aerosol-thin and ultrameta.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A drama that transcends cleverness. This beautiful film, directed with subtlety and grace by Juan José Campanella, really is about moving from fear to love.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A daring and unstable mélange of styles--working-class realism, deadpan fantasy, shameless buffoonery. At times it falls flat, or fails to rise. More often than not, though, it's a heartbreaker.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Living in Emergency is anything but bleeding-heart propaganda.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What she thinks of herself, though, seems perfectly, if improbably, reasonable--a queen of comedy who won't and shouldn't abdicate.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Ms. Clarkson's performance as Juliette, the fashion-writer wife of a United Nations functionary, is the film's reason for being. She makes yearning palpable. She turns mysterious silences into a language of love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Who knew this German-born Turkish filmmaker could perpetrate a delirious farce-in German and Greek with good English subtitles-that doesn't flag for a single one of its 99 minutes?
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This is more than a respectful remake; Let Me In is quietly stylish and thoroughly chilling in its own right.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The film is picture-book pretty and fairly conventional, except for the 3-D, which is emerging as a convention in its own right. Still, the prettiness comes with brains, and the whole production, like those newly eye-catching models of American-made cars, bespeaks resurgent confidence.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Pathos isn't Ms. Dunham's bag. What makes her film fascinating is the delicate mood it sustains.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Nicole Kidman places the bereaved heroine of Rabbit Hole in a nether land between life and not-quite-life. Her beautiful performance transcends the specifics of the script, which David Lindsay-Abaire adapted from his play of the same name.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Words of wisdom keep popping up in My Dog Tulip with gratifying regularity. They're more likely to gratify dog lovers than anyone else, but that's a large group to which I belong.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Ivan Reitman directed, with great verve and unflagging finesse, from a terrifically funny script by Elizabeth Meriwether.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This lively little film, a comic take on Shakespeare's tragedy, is really entertaining.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The main thing about Cedar Rapids is that it makes you laugh-often and out loud.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Delightful and insightful romantic comedy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    I've made a good case for seeing Rango, and why not; an eye feast is still a feast in this lean multiplex season. Be advised, though, of the film's peculiar deficits. The narrative isn't really dramatic, despite several send-up face-offs. It's more like a succession of picturesque notions that might have flowed from DreamWorks or Pixar while their story departments were out to lunch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Morgan Spurlock has come up with a terrific idea-a movie about product placements that depends completely on product placements for its financing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This prequel draws new energy from supersmart casting, plus the shrewd notion of setting the beginnings of the X-Men saga in the early 1960s.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The film's special mixture of sadness, comedy and hope sneaks up on you and stays in your memory.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The Trip is probably too long, but I have to say "probably" because I would have been happy with an additional half-hour of Steve and Rob doing more impressions.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The results are startlingly original, if occasionally overambitious. This is "Tsotsi" without the feel-good glow, a tale of entrepreneurship's perils and boundless pleasures.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Stylistic debts abound: the Coen brothers, Roger Deakins, the bleak, gothic landscapes of Terrence Malick's "Badlands" and Richard Brooks's "In Cold Blood." Through it all, though, is the original and memorable spectacle of violence expressed and repressed by the desperate hero.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Part 2 of The Deathly Hallows, is the best possible end for the series that began a decade ago.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    If you lop off the closing credits of Fred Cavayé's preposterously exciting - and pleasingly preposterous - French-language thriller, the running time is a mere 80 minutes. Not since "Run Lola Run" has the term been used more aptly.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The movie also fights for what it wants - to touch us in the course of entertaining us - and it succeeds, with its zinger-studded script that transcends clumsy mechanics and a spirited cast that includes Marisa Tomei as a nymphomaniacal middle-school teacher, and Jonah Bobo as a lovesick eighth-grader.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A daring feature debut by Evan Glodell, Bellflower looks like it was shot with the digital equivalent of a Brownie box camera, and generates an almost palpable aura of anxiety.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A work of fiction, Mr. Féret's film is ardent in its inventions, modest in scale, playful in its speculations about Nannerl's influence on her brother's music, and graced by the filmmaker's daughter, Marie Féret, in the title role.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    So much movie can be made with so little plot, given sufficient humanity and dramatic tension. That's the case with Andrew Haigh's eloquent chamber piece.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Le Havre stands on its own fragile but considerable merits.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    As such, it's chilling and enjoyable in unequal measure. Entertainment predominates, but entertainment with smarts, and a well-honed edge.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Like Crazy develops slowly, and threatens at first to be just another movie about beautiful young people in the Age of Fraught Relationships. It's much more than that, though. Without belaboring any issues, it speaks volumes about fear of commitment.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Silence makes the film interesting by enticing us to concentrate in ways we're not used to, while artistry carries the day. The Artist may have started as a daring stunt, but it elevates itself to an endearing - and probably enduring - delight.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Represents a big growth spurt in Mr. Cronenberg's career. Its measured pace, along with a style that is sometimes austere (though sometimes anything but) repays close attention with excellent acting and a wealth of absorbing information.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    His (Takeshi) sense of style is very much in evidence here, and so is his sense of humor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It's not fair to say that Ms. Davis steals scenes - one of the movie's strengths is its ensemble cast - but she supercharges every scene she's in.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The images captured by the film - dancers in theatrical sets, dancers in surreal exterior settings - are deeply scary for their loneliness and pain, and crazily thrilling for the intensity of their joy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Martius comes to a bad end, while Mr. Fiennes achieves a great beginning. As a director, his grasp exceeds his daring reach, and his performance stands as a chilling exemplar of psychomartial ferocity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    No beauty contest has ever been more bizarre than the one in Gerardo Naranjo's shockingly powerful thriller.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    There's no deeper meaning to Steven Soderbergh's thriller than what meets the eye, yet its lustrous surfaces offer great and guilt-free pleasure.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Quietly affecting and surprisingly dramatic, so long as you're willing to watch it unfold at its own deliberate pace.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Boy
    Mr. Waititi, a popular standup comic in New Zealand, is wonderfully droll and entertaining in this acting role, which isn't all that far, geography and culture notwithstanding, from Steve Zahn at his stoner best.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    One of the film's best moments of deliciousness comes with the revelation that Yoshikazu, rather than his father, made the sushi that won the Michelin inspectors over; so much for working humbly in the old man's shadow.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The film's power is undercut by its narrow geographic focus, which seems to associate bullying with conservative or working-class areas in red states. The filmmakers could easily have found similar cases involving the children of urban sophisticates.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The director, Kevin Macdonald, searches for clarity amid the contradictions of Marley's life and reaches no conclusions, but that's a tribute to his subject's complexity in a film of fascinating too-muchness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This wise and funny film, in Japanese with English subtitles, works small miracles in depicting the pivotal moment when kids turn from the wishfulness of childhood into shaping the world for themselves.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The violence is graphic, the dialogue can be awfully arch and the style is often mannered, but this long, dense adventure takes surprising side trips into thoughtfulness, ruefulness, whimsy and romance. It's high-grade entertainment sustained by a buoyant spirit.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It's spectacular, to be sure, but also remarkable for its all-encompassing gloom. No movie has ever administered more punishment, to its hero or its audience, in the name of mainstream entertainment.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    His is a special kind of courage, and it impels him to act with special agility in a brave new world of his own making, where little tweets can challenge big lies and a blog post can echo like thunder.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    "Just One More Chance," Billie Holiday implores on the soundtrack. The nice paradox of Arbitrage is that we're interested to see whether Robert gets one, even though he's the villain-in-chief of a suspense thriller whose plot turns on generalized scurrilousness. That's a tribute to Mr. Jarecki's smart writing, and to the take-no-prisoners performance of Mr. Gere.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What's exceptional is the orchestration of color, form, light and dark (lots of dark), 3-D technology and digital effects into a look that amounts to a vision.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Like no one before or since, she had what she valued most in others - good, old-fashioned pizazz.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Blink your eyes and you've lost track of them, but one of the interesting things about the experience is that you don't want to lose track; though the film moves as slowly as its hikers, it demands, and deserves, to be watched closely. (The cinematographer was Inti Briones.)
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Lee's film is stronger as a visual experience - especially in 3-D - than an emotional one, but it has a final plot twist that may also change what you thought you knew about the ancient art of storytelling.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It's a different city today, in a country that sees its racial and social divides with more clarity than it did back then. But the most troubling question the film raises is how clearly we may see even now.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This unique enterprise, which began as a documentary experiment almost a half century ago, has grown into an inspiring testimonial to the unpredictability of the human spirit.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    5 Broken Cameras is short on facts and, like the demonstrations themselves, provocative by nature. Still, it casts a baleful light on anguishing, seemingly incessant scenes of tear gas hurled, bullets fired, villagers fleeing for their lives and, on one shocking occasion, a life lost as the camera rolls. This is how the conflict looks from the other side of the barrier.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What works best is what's readily accessible, the startling power of performers who understand the drama all too well.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Koch the film makes the point without belaboring it — a mayor and a metropolis linked by tumultuous events in the worst and best of times.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It's tempting to see Beyond the Hills solely as an indictment of religion, but the film is more ambitious than that. Ignorance and superstition aren't confined to the convent; people in town, including the cops, drop casual references to witchcraft as if it were part of everyday life. The broader subject is possession by primitive ideas.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The Sapphires isn't flawless, but who cares? It's a joyous affair that's distinguished by its music, and by the buoyant spirit of its stars.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Here's another film, along with "Mud," that's in the American grain, but a genetically conditioned grain of unforgiving fathers and overweening ambition. It's powerful stuff.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The energy in Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf's — what a great title! — is genuine, infectious and superabundant.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    More persuasively still, Blackfish — an Indian name for orcas — argues against the very concept of quasiamusement parks like SeaWorld that turn giant creatures meant for the wild into hemmed-in, penned-up entertainers.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The World's End stands on its own as hilarious high-end nonsense.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Herb and Dorothy, a documentary by Megumi Sasaki, grows on you just as its subjects do.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Beautiful images can be a distraction in a serious documentary, but that's hardly the case here. They draw us in so we can better understand the hurtling changes that endanger the future of Cambodia and, by extension, much of the developing world.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The performances are nothing less than astonishing. It's easy to understand why the Palme d'Or at this year's Cannes Film Festival went to both actresses, though not easy for me to see why the movie itself was included in the unprecedented joint award.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The Square stands as a valuable document of a tormented time, an anatomy of a revolutionary movement doomed by a paucity of viable institutions, and by the movement's failure to advance a coherent agenda. (It's all the more heartbreaking when a speaker at one of the protests cries fervently, "We will fill the world with poetry.")
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    At Berkeley is more than the sum of its minutes. Narration-free and artfully discursive, it's a one-of-a-kind mosaic portrait of a great institution struggling, under dire stress, to retain its essential character at a time of declining support for public education.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Visualizations are Mr. Jung's province, and they're what make his movie so deeply moving, as well as literally illuminating.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    All four performances are first-rate, and the action is staged with shattering intensity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The Invisible Woman gives us a plausible image of the great man in the fullness of his celebrity, and an affecting portrait of the woman who lived much of her life in his shadow.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Family dysfunction has seldom been as flamboyant—or notable for its performances and flow of language—as it is in this screen version of the Tracy Letts play.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What's on screen is a gorgeous grab bag of notions: ardent love, a salute to Thomas Mann's "The Magic Mountain," a bit of "Camille" and a lot — I mean a lot — of nuts-and-bolts stuff about nuts and bolts.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    With someone else in the central role, Gloria might have been cloyingly sentimental or downright maudlin. With Ms. García on hand, it's a mostly convincing celebration of unquenchable energy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Like Father, Like Son has still more on its mind — a vision of a Japan in which work will be balanced with leisure and love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The most intriguing question it raises is whether our feelings about Vermeer may be changed by the likelihood of him having used optics of one sort or another. The answer is yes, unavoidably, but not necessarily for the worse.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Growth is the film's subtext, and finally its subject. Never has a line of dialogue been more freighted with symbolism, or more grounded in literal reality, than when Barbu says, ever so quietly, "Mother, please unlock me."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Wonderfully fresh and affecting fable from India.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Chiemi Karasawa's unblinking documentary feature watches Elaine Stritch struggle with the toughest role of her life—being old, and in constantly uncertain health.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Noah can be silly or sublime, but it's never less than fascinating. I was on board from start to finish.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The made movie — i.e. Mr. Pavich's documentary — makes for a great seminar on creativity. Its star is Mr. Jodorowsky, outrageously handsome and dynamic at the age of 84.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What makes "The Winter Soldier" so enjoyable, though, and what will make it so profitable, is its emotional bandwidth — all the vivid, nuanced life lived by its characters in between their frenzied escapades.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This film, which might have been called "The Fog of Words," isn't haunting, but dismaying. Mr. Rumsfeld is, as always, articulate, energetic and self-confident. Yet his words suggest a paradox — a restless mind with no discernible gift for self-reflection.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Joe
    A beautiful film, shot by Tim Orr, that is elevated by Mr. Cage's stirring portrait of a violence-prone man who can't restrain himself from doing good.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    You don't have to be a fan of Mr. Jarmusch's special brand of indie spookiness to enjoy his new film. All that's required is patience with its languorous pace, plus a willingness to swing between amusement and delight, with periodic pauses at ennui.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Here's a case of images in the service of important ideas, rather than entertainment, yet they could hardly be more powerful, from roaring torrents released by a dam in China to a lyrical helicopter shot of a glistening river in British Columbia.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Ms. Coppola, who is Francis Coppola's granddaughter, has made a coming-of-age film about a culture in which few people — adults included — ever grow up. It's essentially plotless and slowly paced, much like the recent work of her aunt, Sofia Coppola, but astutely observed, full of fine performances and ever so guardedly hopeful about April and the boy who adores her.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    One of those movies that arrives every now and then with no fanfare but a canny sense of how to grab our attention and hold it in a tightening grip.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Yet the heart of the film lies in what it manages to say, without boldface or italics, about how hard it is for Donna, like so many of her anxious cohort, to make genuine connections, to break free of narcissistic constraints and become a stand-up grown-up.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    When the time comes for suffering, the pain of watching her is mingled with the pleasure of a performance that transcends contrivance. This young actress is the real, heart-piercing thing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The Rover, is anything but lively, though it's long on menace, often violent and consistently fascinating.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    All the more remarkably, then, this flawed but startling biopic stars another performer, Chadwick Boseman, who fills Brown's shoes with a dynamism that transcends imitation.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It's a film of modest means and great ambition, a darkly comic drama concerned with nothing less than the place of faith, and an embattled Church, in modern life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Any movie with these two comics is a trip and a half. How about France for the next one? A perfect way to revisit Michael Caine.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Clark Terry the teacher sometimes talks like a trumpet, even though he's dealing with a pianist—"daddle-leedle-daddle-loodle" is how he wants Justin to play one phrase. Clark Terry the man personifies generosity, and it's lovely to behold.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Pride may not be a model of impeccable craftsmanship, but it's a fine example of turning a terrific subject into a gleeful event. It's also an example of the power of entertainment — of entertainment within entertainment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    James Marsh’s movie, which co-stars Felicity Jones as Jane Hawking, the celebrated physicist’s wife, is a biographical love story that doesn’t depend on science to shape the plot — it’s rich in emotional intelligence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Foxcatcher is a radical departure from Mr. Miller’s previous feature, the smart and entertaining “Moneyball.” It isn’t meant as conventional entertainment, but it’s fascinating to watch from start to finish.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Ana Lily Amirpour’s A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night. (What a terrific title!) This precocious, faux-primitive first feature, in Persian with English subtitles, and a sensationally eclectic score, was shot in wide-screen black-and-white, and frequently mimics the dreamlike rhythms of silent films.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    As a director, working with actors, she may have drawn on her own experience acting in features and TV; whatever her method, she has come up with a matched pair of terrific performances.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What’s admirable about Pioneer is its succession of interesting environments, both below and above the water’s surface, and the quietly appealing figure at the center of the international intrigue.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Now, thanks to this last film, in 3-D, the pleasure is intense, and mixed with awe. There is majesty here, and not just because we’re in the presence of magnificently regal madness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Red Army is about many things — politics and sport, service and servitude, integrity trumped by money. Most memorably, though, it celebrates a good man living a great life by his own lights.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What We Do in the Shadows has nonmedicinal virtues that many large-scale movies lack: unflagging energy, entertaining inventiveness, sustained ridiculousness and even, dare I say it, a spasm of eloquence in Deacon’s twisted tribute to the frailties of the human race.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    In an industry afflicted by sequelitis, it has taken John Boorman almost three decades to make the sequel to his much-cherished “Hope and Glory,” but Queen and Country turns out to be well worth the wait.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A fascinating procedural with a fitting climax.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    If Dope were as earnest as Malcolm seems to be, you might expect it to be a bit of a bore. No worries on that count, though. Mr. Famuyiwa has a sleeve full of aces.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Mark Ruffalo is yet again a revelation in Infinitely Polar Bear, and he’s not the only one. This is a first feature by Maya Forbes, yet many of its accomplishments put far more experienced filmmakers in the shade.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    In a movie devoted mainly to making you laugh, it’s a plea for tolerance that takes your breath away.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The film is clearly not for everyone; sometimes it wasn’t for me. But it’s steadfastly nonjudgmental and wonderfully tender toward two searchers for new versions of old-fashioned love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Even when the masks are dropped, though, it’s all but impossible to tell the good guys from the bad. Both sides are corrupt, both sides do terrible harm. Although the film has its shortcomings and simplifications, it’s a bleakly persuasive view of a decades-long combat that respects no boundaries, and seems to hold no prospect of surcease.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A must-view film for our media-besotted age.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Anyone who doesn’t have a grand time watching Shaun the Sheep Movie is suffering from a fractured funny bone that needs to be reset.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    An off-kilter romantic comedy in which everything turns out the way you might have hoped it would if you hadn’t been kept in a state of happy suspense along the way.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It’s a paradox worth noting, and savoring, that the most dramatic movie of the week doesn’t have a script.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Z for Zachariah asks us to suspend a good deal of disbelief. Ann is absurdly beautiful, and Ms. Robbie emerges as a full-fledged star, even though her performance is precise and understated.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The worst thing I can say about Rosenwald, a wonderful documentary by Aviva Kempner, is that it tends to ramble. I say it, though, in the spirit of the joyous New Orleans funeral march “Oh! Didn’t He Ramble.” How could Ms. Kempner’s narrative follow anything like a straight line when her subject is so rich and varied?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The film, directed with exceptional flair and elegant concision by Scott Cooper, even comes from Warner Bros., the studio that specialized in psychopathic monsters played by such stars as James Cagney and Edward G. Robinson during Hollywood’s golden age.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    I can tell you that Ms. Laurent’s direction is astute and economical, that both of the film’s young stars give fine performances, and that Breathe is a very good title for a film that ever so gradually takes your breath away.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A relatively small, tough-minded drama about pitiless people doing unprincipled things, proves to be one of the most interesting, elegantly crafted and — paradoxically, given the dark subject matter — elating films to come along in recent memory.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    As horror upon horror unfolds in Prophet’s Prey, Amy Berg’s shocking documentary about the mad polygamist Warren Jeffs and his followers, one may marvel, in horror, at the elaborate forms that deviancy can take.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    In many ways the film reflects its hero’s brilliance. It’s a scintillating construction, though one that sometimes feels like a product launch in its own right.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    From start to almost finish, Man Up, directed by Ben Palmer from a terrific script by Tess Morris, sustains a remarkably high level of verbal invention. Mr. Pegg, a superb comic actor in his own right, serves as an endearingly frantic foil to Ms. Bell, whose lips, larynx, facial features and thought processes all move at Mach 2 speed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    She is revealed in all her complexity by Mr. Björkman’s film, in which passages from his subject’s letters, notes and diaries are read by the fine young Swedish actress Alicia Vikander. “I don’t demand much,” the film quotes her as saying. “I just want everything.” She got a lot, and gave immeasurably more.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    This English film, directed by Nicholas Hytner, is also wonderfully funny, terribly touching and a vehicle — with comically dilapidated vehicles — for the boundless gifts of Maggie Smith.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    In a truly weird way Anomalisa provides an immersive experience that is no less compelling, though lots more authentic, than the one you get in a megahorror show like “The Revenant.” Once you’re in that puppet’s head it’s hard to get out.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The film is neither kind nor cruel, but wise, great-spirited and wonderfully enjoyable. It’s an addled dream of beauty unlike any other.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A beautifully strange and stirring sci-fi adventure.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The result feels perfectly American — I wonder if Conrad was named in honor of the troubled brother in “Ordinary People” — yet the film lives and breathes with a lovely intimacy and density of detail that we associate with fine independent features from Europe.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The film, produced in conjunction with NASA, also fulfills its inspirational function with screen-filling, soul-filling views of the main space station in the story — the one that harbors all our lives and hopes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Marvel’s new “Captain America” is anything but bleak — what’s so audacious about the film, and so pleasing, is its quicksilver mix of hardcore action and bright comedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It’s the film Hesse deserves — lively and concise, though calmly comprehensive; thoughtful and essentially serious, but with a witty appreciation of the oddity, recklessness and absurdity that its subject valued; rich with history, and beautifully made in its own right.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Ms. Miller proves to be an original, setting her comic characters in motion like mini-planets that spin in eccentric but overlapping orbits.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The Witness is remarkable for its emotional impact, and its clarity. The picture that emerges isn’t perfectly clear; the whole truth will never be known, Bill Genovese says. What he has made known, though, is valuable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Morgan Neville’s documentary is a joyous revelation, a group portrait of superb musicians from all over the world offering music as an emblem of what people can do in these fractious times when they live in concert with one another.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Suffice it to say that the film is a must-see for fans of the man (who, like many of his gifted colleagues, has given up on what’s left of the Hollywood studio system) and a should-see for anyone who cares about how movies are made, as well as how, in certain near-miraculous cases, really good movies get made.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Finding Dory can be touching, sweet and tender, but it’s compulsively, preposterously and steadfastly funny.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What’s most significant, though, is the merciless nature of the cyberbullying, and the terrifying ease with which it’s inflicted. Tickled opens a smudged window on a dark alley of contemporary life.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Has its share of misfired jokes and pseudo-mythic sequences that semi-fizzle. All in all, though, it’s majestical nonsense that is anything but nonsensical.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The BFG has fizz to spare. It’s an effervescent charmer.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    You’ll want to see Zero Days — just not when you’re counting on a good night’s sleep a few hours later. Alex Gibney’s documentary about cyberwarfare is many things, none of them lulling: a thriller, a detective procedural, a startling chronicle of science fiction transformed into fact, and an urgent plea for public discussion of a new way of waging war that could wreak havoc on a scale akin to that of nuclear weapons.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    If you’re looking for something to lift you up and take you away from the tumult and anguish of the moment, seek out Our Little Sister, a lovely new film, in Japanese with English subtitles, that’s going into national distribution this week.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Don’t Think Twice really shines as an improv procedural, a film that celebrates, in illuminating detail, the skills and anxieties of this showbiz subgenre.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The first and last things to be said in this limited space about Kubo and the Two Strings are that it’s a showcase for some of the most startlingly beautiful animation in recent — and not so recent — memory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Herzog’s film may not be a model of organization, but I loved every meandering minute.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The substance is enchanting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It’s family entertainment in the freshest sense of the term, a biographical drama, based on a true story, that vibrates with more colors — emotional as well as visual — than I can name.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The most daring part of this wonderful film, which was written and directed by Jeff Nichols, is its calmness. Momentous events move at a human pace while Richard and Mildred Loving — a matchless pair of performances by Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga — try with varying success to comprehend what’s happening to them.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    What’s remarkable about Arrival is its contemplative core—and, of course, Ms. Adams’s star performance, which is no less impassioned for being self-effacing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    So too much of a good thing really isn’t too much, and some of the exceptionally good things are the songs written by Lin-Manuel Miranda. But how will they do the water on Broadway?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Somewhat unshapely, though not shapeless; often repetitive; gleefully reckless with facts; probably too long (I say “probably” because I enjoyed every one of its 126 minutes); at times demandingly dense, with the kind of sizzling crosstalk that hasn’t been heard since Robert Altman, and as madly fragmented as its hero’s mind must have been.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Saroo is played dazzlingly by Dev Patel, who gives his richest performance since Mira Nair’s “The Namesake.”
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The filmmaker has put two familiar pieces of music to such glorious, full-throated use toward the end that I can’t resist mentioning them: Donovan’s “Deep Peace,” and “Unchained Melody” done in close harmony by the Fleetwoods. For Nathalie in the uncertainty of the here and now, peace and harmony are great ideas too.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The hurtling action, speaking louder than any dialogue, gives a stirring sense of the suffering and heroism that flowed from the terror at the Boylston Street finish line.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    It’s really funny, though, an animated sendup of comic-book epics that vanquishes solemnity with the power of supersilliness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    An enchanting documentary by Ceyda Torun, operates on three levels, and we’re not speaking metaphorically here.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    An act of expiation, Land of Mine is honorable, harrowing and stirring.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Raw
    This French-language horror film is shockingly well made for a debut feature: Julia Ducournau, who wrote and directed it, really knows her stuff and is clearly bound for mainstream success, if that’s where her appetites take her.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    [Kore-eda's] latest film, though, has a special warmth and grace. It unfolds slowly, sneaks up on big questions about intertwined mysteries of family and personal destiny, and pretty much answers them, though the biggest question for Ryota is whether he’ll be changed by what he learns.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    A pitch-black, blood-soaked comedy and phenomenal first feature by Alice Lowe, who also stars as Ruth, the pregnant heroine.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The payoff is sneakily profound — sneakily because this small-scale drama grabs you when you least expect it, often with the help of the dog.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    An unusually engaging portrait of a legendary chef who can be insufferable, as his most ardent admirers acknowledge, but who is also a brighter-than-life charmer, raging perfectionist, world-class hedonist, self-styled dandy and all-too-human survivor of the highest-end restaurant wars.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    The whole enterprise rests on Mr. Crowe's armor-clad shoulders, and he carries it remarkably well.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Taut, smart, intense and genuinely scary, Trey Edward Shults’s It Comes at Night fulfills the promise, and then some, of the filmmaker’s 2015 debut feature, “Krisha.”
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Lost in Paris is nonsensical by design, a comedy of the absurd that’s always entertaining and occasionally pure.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Ms. Dorfman, bless her open heart, has been captivated by the surfaces of the people she shoots, of how they seem. “I am totally not interested in capturing their souls.”
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Beguiling, meditative and elegantly photographed documentary.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Genially aware of itself and terrifically likeable. Only now is this series coming of age.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Joe Morgenstern
    Whether the truth sets anyone free is unknowable at this point, but the city that was being slaughtered silently has been heard, and its suffering has been seen.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    This isn't great filmmaking, but, under Rick Famuyiwa's direction, it's more than good enough.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    A strange anomaly. It's both cutting-edge entertainment and primitive precursor of unimagined wonders to come.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    I paid steadfast attention, both to the actress, a performer of unusual versatility, and to the character she plays, a caged -- and cagey -- bird who sings because she's too stubborn to cry.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    When Kevin Spacey takes center stage, our planet really does seem bright.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Halle Berry is something else as Leticia Musgrove, the widow of an inmate who's just been executed by Hank and his crew, and that something else is commandingly passionate.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    I regretted it most when the temporal hopscotching took me away from Ms. Winslet's portrait of the writer as a young sensualist, madly smitten by words and life.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    A Hollywood production that appeals to our patriotism while respecting our intelligence.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    I did enjoy the movie's mercurial moods -- anxiety, terror, whimsical horror -- and I welcomed its confirmation that the work of the devil includes SUVs.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    I found this film deeply affecting as well. It has a gravity that's independent of technique, and an engaging spirit that's enhanced by flashes of comedy.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Mixes whiffs of Woody Allen and Federico Fellini with Mr. Farmanara's distinctive, mordant wit.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Bears no resemblance to the smarmy fraud that Roberto Benigni perpetrated in "Life Is Beautiful."
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    There's plenty of scary pleasure to be had from this clever, compact thriller.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    If truth be told, the film is less than the sum of its parts; the main problem is the fragmented narrative structure, a legacy of the literary source. Still, it's a joy to see men and women with dense life stories played by powerful actors with long and distinguished careers.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    It's hard to imagine spending $120 million on a film starring a computer-generated mouse -- an actor who barely demands a byte to eat -- but if that's how much it takes to provide innocent enchantment for the global hordes, so be it. This sequel beats the original paws down.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    The vision of office work that's offered up by Haiku Tunnel is as chilling as it is funny.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Several startling depictions of the artist at work make you forget, if only temporarily, the serious shortcomings of the script.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 24 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Beyond being entertained, I was delighted by the movie's outpouring of slapstick invention (one crazed sequence in a pet store has all the pawmarks of a classic), and the genial energy of its star, David Arquette.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    By the end, though, the production is engulfed by barely controlled frenzy -- all decor and no air, music as lo-cal ear candy, scenes as merchandise to be sold, people as two-dimensional props.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    By turns intriguing, boring, frustrating, amazing and stirring, this is a tour de force that, necessarily, lacks dramatic force, but one that creates a dream state of seemingly limitless dimensions.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Ambitious and uneven.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Didn't see through it, though I had a rough sense of what was coming, and didn't have all that much fun. I did enjoy the movie's cheerful preoccupation with style.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    May be something of a stunt, but it's a fascinating stunt that holds your attention from the start to shortly before the finish.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    This ambitious, entertaining movie, which showed at film festivals earlier this year, has been hailed in some quarters as a masterpiece worthy of Arthur Miller's Willy Loman or Sinclair Lewis's George Babbitt. Yet its social comments are stained by condescension, and its uplift is sustained by sentimentality that Mr. Nicholson's prickly Everyman can't conceal.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Finally seems like a bit of a con in its own right, but a marvelously smooth one.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Considering the star power -- and talent -- of the cast around her, it would have been impressive if Alison Lohman had simply held her own as Astrid, the young heroine of White Oleander. Instead, she owns the movie.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    The cast is the main attraction in Francois Ozon's witty, even touching 8 Women.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 32 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    It's a shrewd little comedy that uses good British actors to challenge its star, who rises to the occasion.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Combines silly stuff about life in Los Angeles with buoyant energy, a couple of chases worthy of the Keystone Kops and quick-witted actors playing droll characters with obvious affection.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    This flamboyantly operatic anti-war film takes getting used to, though it leaves you with memorable images of madness, both poetic and military.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    This one is nowhere near as original -- it's a flawed remake of a fine first feature from Norway -- but "Insomnia" still stands on its own as a thriller with brains and scenic beauty.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Pays off in surprising ways, when love of music, and fame, plays second fiddle to love of family.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Howard, and the screenwriter, Akiva Goldsman, have used the book as nothing more than their jumping-off point for an erratic work of fiction that's part mystery thriller and part Hollywood schmaltz.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    One would have to be totally tone-deaf not to notice that the director, Andrew Davis, has inflicted a broad cartoon style on adult performers who are distinctly uncomfortable with it.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    A movie you can't readily get out of your head.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Edward Norton makes an art of self-containment. No contemporary actor gives less away to more effect, and he's at his closely held best in 25th Hour, a drama of redemption, directed by Spike Lee, that seldom rises to the level of his performance.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Nothing to write home about, though nothing to stay home about either, especially if you're a dyed-in-the-polyester Powers fan.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 32 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    What the movie lacks in coherence it makes up for in zest, well-founded self-delight and a sharpshooter's eye for the absurdities of reality TV.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    The brute force of Terminator 3 is relieved, I'm happy to say, by Claire Danes's winning performance as John Connor's reluctant accomplice (whom the production notes describe, not inaccurately, as an "unsuspecting veterinarian"); by many of the special effects, which don't seem obsolete at all, and, yes, by the sinister trix of the Terminatrix.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Yet dramatic energy is in short supply. The actors move about this elaborate movie museum in a modified dream state, as if living in the present while rooted in the past. But the strategy doesn't work. It's an imitation of lifelessness.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    A surprise and a not-so-guilty pleasure.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    For all its pictorial splendor and carefully calculated drama, this film misses greatness by a country mile.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    There's no doubt, though, that The Rundown will be a crowd-pleaser, despite a forgettable title and lots of roughness around the production's edges. It's a comedy-adventure with a frivolous soul.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    This story of 12 manipulable -- or manipulative -- men and women rarely fails to hold your interest, even though much of it doesn't hold water.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    By turns chilling, mysterious and inspiring; sometimes it's all of those at once.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    The film has a surprisingly sweet spirit, and its co-stars respect the human core in their garish material; Mr. Kinnear, especially, has never been more likable.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Though the film is somber, it certainly commands one's attention, and for a while one's respect.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Looks splendid and commands respect, but leaves you wondering what essential something you missed. It's a worthy film at war with itself.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    A seasoned director might have known when to ask Ms. Theron to do less, or nothing at all; as things stand, she acts at every single moment. But what brave and ferocious acting she does.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    The great lesson of the film is that humor, honest feelings and genuine exuberance trump technique.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Entertaining and improbably endearing.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Full of life -- which is a very good thing to say about a story that turns on death -- wonderfully odd, and a gallery of perfect performances.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    The fascination here is not so much the surface drama, though that is suspenseful and sometimes shocking, but Michele's inability to grasp the nature and extent of the evil that surrounds him.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Isn't the best romantic comedy one might wish for, but it's more than good enough.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    It's a powerful polemic in its own right, despite some maddeningly glib generalizations, a documentary that functions as a 2½-hour provocation in the ongoing debate about corporate conduct and governance.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Though there's less to the film than seduces the eye, the allure of those surfaces can be hypnotic.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Its terrific cast kept making me laugh out loud.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Supremacy certainly works on its own terms, but those terms are limiting. It's an entertainment machine about a killing machine.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Reconstruction means to be confusing, and is. It also means to intrigue us, and does.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Makes an eloquent case for John Kerry's courage, both during and immediately after his service in Vietnam.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    For all its energy, fine performances and dramatic confrontations, Friday Night Lights substitutes intensity for insight, dodging the book's harsher findings like a dazzling broken-field runner.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Walken performs with a marvelously minimalist precision.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Ms. Bening is the only reason to see the movie, but a compelling reason. Just like Julia, she prevails over lesser mortals with unfailing zest.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Watching the actors and gorgeous trappings is an adventure in cognitive dissonance. I didn't believe a single minute in almost three hours, but enjoyed being there all the same.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    It is thoughtful, unfashionable, measured, mostly honest, sometimes clumsy or remote, often exciting, occasionally moving and eventually surprising. It's correct.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Everyone is touched by sadness or hobbled by self-deception, and everyone is interesting, even moving, to watch until the drama slowly suffocates beneath the weight of its revelations.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    An unusual amalgam of formulaic feel-goodism and shocking tough-mindedness, a movie that allows us to decode the inner life of its hero while he's decoding the world around him.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    How, then, does "In Good Company" turn out for the better in spite of itself? No mystery at all. Whatever the fate of old media, or new media, for that matter, winning performances are here to stay.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    A Knight's Tale wasn't made for people like me. It was made for the kids of summer.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Crude as its build-up may be, the movie pays off with unexpected delicacy.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    It's no classic, but you don't need to be a cultist to get in on the tawdry fun.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Joan Allen, for whom the role was written, combines severity, which she has often played before, with such levity and verve that she lifts the whole film on the wings of Terry's wrath.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    In the absence of internal logic, external style and emotional intelligence carry the day.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Batman Begins summons up moments of great eloquence and power. If only its cast of characters was as fully inhabited as its turbulent city.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    It's a fine film, full of small epiphanies.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    There are worlds within the startling world of Murderball.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Mr. Van Sant and his star, Michael Pitt, together with the cinematographer Harris Savides, set out to do a somber, rigorously distanced study of a man drained of all resources, and slowly though inexorably approaching his end. That they have done exactly what they meant to do is notable.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Not everything is illuminated in his (Liev Schreiber) version, but the book's humanity and humor shine through.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Here's a case of clichés transmuted, for the most part, into stirring entertainment.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    Prime is neither deep nor as shallow as it first threatens to be, but surprisingly good fun.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    A valuable film, provided one doesn't ask too much of it.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Joe Morgenstern
    For a film filled with jagged shards of glass, and sometimes shot kaleidoscopically, through the windows of houses or cars, Bee Season is carefully, almost relentlessly, intended. That said, the script, by Naomi Foner Gyllenhaal, touches on themes that rarely make it to the big screen.
    • Wall Street Journal

Top Trailers