For 1,169 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 26% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 72% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joe Neumaier's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 49
Highest review score: 100 Blackfish
Lowest review score: 0 I'm Still Here
Score distribution:
1,169 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Clayman, who co-directed with filmmaker friends, is fascinating company.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    It's strange to call a film with so much nudity and simulated sex "old-fashioned," but The Sessions nicely bridges that gulf.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Is it all valid? Perhaps. Should the film's questions be addressed? Absolutely.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    As the team gets in shape, a hot new ringer is brought in and the fallen son redeems himself - and director Steve Rash's movie wins us over.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    This trip through the seminal performance artist's (often literal) body of work is sometimes too cozy, yet Abramovic might argue that objectivity is impossible if truth is the destination.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    The movie sometimes has the feel of an Olympic sprinter running in place. There’s so much energy expended to get to one spot. Constant searches beget more searches. It all gets exhausting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Abe's day-to-day trials may eventually seem like cheap daytime TV, but Gelber and Solondz know how to nail the uncomfortably funny optimism shadowing American desperation.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Quirky, but infinitely more interesting than big-budget Hollywood cousins.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    The faces and voices are endlessly compelling as they talk about what inspires them to lay down beats and recall the early days in New York. Ice-T, disentangled from acting, makes himself a fine focal point.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    As a look at how we got from there to here, “Evocateur” is one for the time capsule.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Though it teeters at times on the edge between potboiler and melodrama, Arbitrage benefits from a notable lack of sympathy for Gere's Gordon Gekko-like Miller. Rather than seeming pat, Jarecki's straightforward cynicism is pointed and purposeful.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Writer Sarah Koskoff's nuanced script and director Todd Louiso's ("Love, Liza") delicate tone follow indie terrain, but go the right way.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Before it devolves into typical American-style action, there’s an intriguing, European-style complexity to Dead Man Down.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Director Craig Zobel's indie, based on real cases, has a sharp psychological point and a can't-look-away quality even as it turns horrifically dark.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    This gorgeous-looking documentary is crying out to be remade as a family film feature.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Howard, whose previous tales of men in professional peril include the topnotch “Apollo 13” as well as “Backdraft” and “Cinderella Man,” works with cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle to create a style in the racing scenes that makes the most of every angle. By the time the final lap of Rush starts, we’re up for the ride.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    The boat rides and picnics we're privy to are an enjoyable way to get to a bittersweet conclusion. Yet it's hard not to feel like we've taken this trip before.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    As this strong, moving documentary shows, for those who came to the U.S., reconnecting to their culture and blood relatives can result in a generation of young people who feel "somewhere between" Chinese and American. They're never fully one or the other, but in the best cases can feel part of both.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    In a film that deliberately recalls 1970's "Five Easy Pieces," Dano's performance as a lost dreamer running from adulthood resonates beautifully.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Winstead and director James Ponsoldt add something gripping and modern to the cinema of recovery, a well-mined genre that can still, it seems, yield thoughtful surprises.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Writer-director Julia Loktev sustains the tension for long, Antonioni-esque passages that portend something momentous. The film delivers in unexpected ways, and then ponders what it means.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Branagh, taking advantage of his experience helming 2011’s “Thor,” shows an allegiance to the genre he’s working in; both as director as co-star, he pours on the menace.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Fred Schepisi's sly, stately comedy-drama that will please fans of BBC melodramas. But even on its own merits, its mild manner has sneaky stings.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    This beautifully photographed drama is well-played throughout with great conscience without becoming heavy-handed.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Wahlberg and Johnson are the saving graces of an in-your-face movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    The poetry in The Place Beyond the Pines can be elusive, but also easy to get lost in.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Though too much of this of-the-people, for-the-people chronicle is by necessity gummed up by clunky captions and explanations, it is an effective, and heartfelt, clarion call.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Like its subject, the movie is not as calculating as it seems.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Colorful folks and cool stunts abound, but casual viewers may still utter a big "Why?"
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Joe Neumaier
    Toscanini plays a role in the tale, as does Einstein and a young Zubin Mehta. If director Josh Aronson tries to follow a few too many strands of the story, it's only because there's so many tantalizing ones.