For 752 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joe Williams' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Budapest Hotel
Lowest review score: 25 Endless Love
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 59 out of 752
752 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    This hand-drawn French import is fresh evidence that you don’t need computers and singing princesses to make a charming animated movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    For better or worse, the whole exercise in lurid leg-pulling goes out with a bang.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    The movie is best enjoyed as a minor-key operatic, not a coherent story. While Law bellows blasphemous poetry, his director orchestrates a noirish light show with a cockeyed rhythm.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    With stately surroundings and hissable villains, director Amma Assante imbues the finale with such dramatic resonance that Belle becomes a ringing proclamation of human dignity.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    As predictable as a 3-and-0 pitch down the middle, but when it’s baseball season, who wants dark clouds?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    You can tell by some loose threads and hurried workmanship that God’s Pocket is a knock-off, but it’s so stuffed with value, it’s an offer you can’t refuse.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    How could you not marvel at a movie that includes a revisionist explanation of the JFK assassination, a football stadium floating over the White House and the sight of Richard Nixon firing a .45 at a villain in a Christ-figure pose?
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    The Immigrant is not unlike a Prohibition-era “Taxi Driver,” with Cotillard as the apprentice hooker, Phoenix as the sweet-talking pimp and Jeremy Renner (playing the theater’s magician, Orlando) as the would-be savior.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Although Steadman’s artwork seems like sloppy pen-and-ink caricature, there’s a method to the madness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    The sharp writing and tag-team antics lift 22 Jump Street to a high level.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Sorry, partisans, but there’s nothing obvious about Obvious Child.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Doggedly indie but unpretentious, Begin Again is one of the best movies I’ve seen about the music industry and the ways it changes people whose paths diverge.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    In one of the most wickedly funny scenes in sci-fi history, Koba uses monkeyshines to bamboozle some gun-toting yahoos and scuttle the peace treaty.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Mainstream audiences will note that Hudson has never been better and that the tearjerking taps into something universal. For audiences seeking shelter from superhero carnage, Wish I Was Here is a lovely place to be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    A film that aims for the stars and may have found one here on earth.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Like black coffee that's flung in our face, The Killer Inside Me silences the question of whether it's good or bad. But for darn sure, it's strong.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Gleeson is great as the troubled, conscientious priest, but until an abruptly shocking finale, his fatalism turns the ticking clock into a congested hourglass.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    While director Michael Roskam lays the groundwork for a heist thriller, The Drop is fueled by character, not plot.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    What makes Love Is Strange so special is that the challenges the couple face are more mundane than menacing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    In a poignant and potentially depressing film, it’s redeeming to see that when they are with their kindred spirits, even the saddest skeletons can dance.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Ultimately what makes Gone Girl so watchable is the three-headed monster of Fincher, Pike and Affleck. The director bathes the B-movie scenario in the queasy-green hues of a morgue, while Affleck flashes his million-dollar smile like a dime-store Dracula and the beautifully inscrutable Pike absorbs the light like a wax mannequin. If it’s true that Nick and Amy were made for each other, they were made in a fiendish lab.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    A genuinely touching and occasionally powerful film, not least because the boys are so disinclined to pity themselves.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Despite playing with a stacked deck, The Judge is guilty of exceeding expectations.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    One one level, Pride is as fake as a lip-sync revue, yet the emotions it arouses are real.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    While the chronological details and social significance of the story Webb reported get shortchanged, Kill the Messenger is a vital reminder that a free press must be free to press the powerful for answers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    The iconic actor may be too gruff for sainthood, but Murray still retains a secret stash of soul.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Directed by and starring Mathieu Amalric, it’s a deceptively low-key riff on a Hitchcock whodunit. It’s both sexy and inscrutable, a cold-blooded puzzler to the very end.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Most biographical docs contain a montage of old footage, but this one is especially haunting. As Campbell watches home movies, he has to ask Kim to identify the people on screen, including his ex-wives, his children and his younger self.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Although it doesn’t make a lick of sense as a stand-alone story, Mockingjay — Part 1 is the first “Hunger Games” movie with meat on its bones.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    While the wilderness vistas are starkly beautiful, there’s no tangible sense of Strayed’s ultimate goal. (Why Oregon?) And the flashbacks, which include scenes of sexual misadventure and heroin use, are too brief to provide answers.

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