For 817 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joe Williams' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Master
Lowest review score: 0 The Divergent Series: Insurgent
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 67 out of 817
817 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    By turning a whistle-blower into a tragicomic figure, Soderbergh sustains our interest in a complicated financial scheme and rewards it with a kickback of ghastly laughs.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Many of the people reading this review are doing it on a computer. And all of them are reading it in English. It’s not much of stretch to say that you could credit both of those things to a man named Alan Turing.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Imagine an opulent movie palace that was 30,000 years old, with posters preserved on the curving walls and the bones of the Stone Age patrons peacefully sleeping in the fairy dust. That's essentially what archeologists found in a French canyon in 1994 and what Werner Herzog brings back to life in the extraordinary documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    A one-joke movie, but it’s a joke whose recurring rimshots grow as loud as our laughter.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Notwithstanding the characters’ spiritual camaraderie, Salles’ emphasizes the hard physical labor and loneliness in Sal’s story, including the jittery rigors of the writing process. When he reaches a crossroads choice between down-and-out Dean and his own rising career, Sal senses that except for the words on a typewritten scroll, his life on the road is gone, real gone.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Both arduous and artful, City of Life and Death is the best imaginable movie about the genocidal siege that's now called the Rape of Nanking. Anything more explicit would be unwatchable; anything more contemplative would be a betrayal of the sustained suffering.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    For a public that's been bullied by the tastemakers, the mystery is a gift. Once we exit this fun house, the only giant left to obey is ourselves.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    The Rover is a sterling example of the new Australian noir.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Directed by Steve James, whose “Hoop Dreams” Ebert hailed as the best film of the 1990s, it’s the kind of documentary the dying man wanted — honest, humane and inclusive.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    He’s like a globe-trotting Richard Linklater. And with Winterbottom’s first-ever sequel, his “Trip” films now rival Linklater’s “Before” series in charting how a twosome evolves over time. Plus, they’re bloody hilarious.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Love & Mercy is artfully but unobtrusively directed by Bill Pohlad.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    It’s not only a fresh and funny spoof of the movie business, it represents a real-life triumph within it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    The most exhilarating film of the year is also the most exhausting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Star Trek Into Darkness offers much of what the fans expect and not much of what they don't. This character-driven vehicle is a supercharged example of cinematic craftsmanship.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Although you don't have to be a sports fan to enjoy it, Moneyball is one of the best baseball movies imaginable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Beautifully but simply wrought by director Cindy Meehl, this deft documentary is a poignant reappraisal of what it means to be human.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    This is a kaleidoscopic valentine to a great city from a director who knows and loves his subject.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    The reason District 9 reverberates so loudly is because its moral indignation is cranked to 11.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Among recent documentaries, First Position soars to the head of the class.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    May be too cute to qualify as high art, but it's highly entertaining.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Although it's slow to unfold, this courtroom drama is so timelessly humane and even-handed it feels like it came from the dockets of Solomon - by way of Sidney Lumet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Gilroy vividly evokes both the LA exteriors and newsroom interiors, and the action sequences are fraught with tension.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    Nowhere Boy is too astutely written and directed to go to predictably melodramatic extremes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    As they build up steam, two powerful actors keep us wondering whether this train is bound for war or peace.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Joe Williams
    It's a well-earned curtain call for some of the most beloved characters in one of the best-sustained feats of recent cinema.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Like the recent "Greenberg," Cyrus is not the jokey, polished production you would expect from its Hollywood cast and LA setting, but audiences who are comfortable with discomfort should find it "funny."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    Ultimately, William Kunstler: Disturbing the Universe is a defense, not a prosecution, and the principal witness remains a shining star.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    This thriller about the game-changing website Wikileaks is as smart about cyberspace as “The Social Network,” but there’s a glitch when it shifts the focus from felonious leaders to the misdemeanors of the man who exposed them.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    With Labor Day, director Jason Reitman turns a Nicholas Sparks scenario into an Alfred Hitchcock creep-show.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Joe Williams
    The kids in the movie, from musicians to marital artists, are unusually skillful, and Smith seems assured of more starring roles. By the end of The Karate Kid, we can't help cheering, even when we know we've been sucker-punched.

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