John Anderson

Select another critic »
For 183 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Nostalgia for the Light
Lowest review score: 0 Bio-Dome
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 85 out of 183
  2. Negative: 27 out of 183
183 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Exposes director Khan's stage roots -- he has no feel for the close-up, although his use of the frame itself, and negative space, is occasionally thrilling.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film is almost distractingly beautiful to look at, something that accentuates the tension between the film's conflicting quantities, i.e., the glories of the physical world, and the corrupted humanity it hosts.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The cast is really fine, but the script requires a lot of hard swallowing. The story moves along briskly and colorfully but gets further and further from the intimate atmosphere that initially makes it so appealing. [25 Apr 1997]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    A goofball movie, in the way "Malkovich" was, but it tries too hard.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The visuals are kinetic, the pacing frenetic; the violence, or at least its aftermath, doesn’t just border on the excessive, it makes major incursions. But given the criminal milieu at hand, nothing less would have seemed plausible, or equal to the heightened, sordid sensibility Mr. Johnson creates in the film’s opening moments and maintains right up to an ending that is among the more perverse in recent memory.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Mr. Nixey is doing an Alfred Hitchcock homage within a movie lacking anything as subversive, or skilled, as Hitchcock.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Pathetically unfunny most of the time.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Directors Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini show the same appreciation for eccentrics and humanity they brought to "American Splendor" and Mr. Dano's Louis is a delicately wrought wonder.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    To resort to strictly ethnocentric references, Fanaa is equal parts MGM extravaganza, Shakespeare lite and James Bond. In their heart of hearts, isn't that what movie audiences really want?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Hyams the director ("Sudden Death," "Timecop," "The Star Chamber") operates at too much of a fevered pitch for things not to eventually get out of hand -- accelerating violence and horror eventually hit maximum velocity and warp into nonsense, no matter how erudite the script.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    While Amma's teachings of love, inner peace and Karma, or action, resonate in the film -- obviously, Amma is a woman called to God -- her background remains pretty much a mystery. Less National Geographic and more personal history would have added a dimension to "Darshan."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    A virulent but thoroughly entertaining trilogy of tales about the besieged lower classes of Edinburgh, ripe with vulgarity, self-loathing, violence and economic disorder.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Doesn't the reigning genius of the German language deserve his own "Shakespeare in Love"? Sure. But as Goethe scampers about Leipzig, comically failing his doctoral exam, spilling his books and looking bemused, young Johann might as well be auditioning for his own Disney Channel program.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Jakubowicz has made a muscular, messy and vulgar film based on a life that has been all those things.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    As pure comedy, The D Train is far more cringe-worthy than outright hilarious. But as a study in human nature, it’s beyond provocative — and maybe even instructive.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    But as Isaac, Rifkin is simply transcendent, giving what is the most accomplished performance of the year. He does not, however, have a completely successful movie around him.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    There's not enough sustained musical momentum to simulate the energy of an actual rave; the characters are likable but unremarkable.
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Some parts of the film are drily academic, but much of it is quite beautiful and artfully put together by the director.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Odd, funny film.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    It's not that the movie is never funny. It's just that you don't feel very good when it is.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    In addition to its terrifically bratty performance by the epically bratty Posey, House of Yes contains some of the smarter (and smarter-assed) writing of the year.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Camp X-Ray isn’t anti-American, despite much of Ali’s rhetoric. It is about the evils of ignorance, wherever it rears its ugly head.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    The movie thus moves from truly creepy to truly inane, which is, unfortunately, all too common in films of this ilk.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film benefits enormously from having the luminous Rebecca Hall as its lead. It also gains an ominous gravity from the haunted, wounded and wobbly England in which it's set.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    It's doubtful Milarepa will be opening in Beijing any time soon; all the more reason it deserves a look.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Safe House is a sturdy enough thriller, but one that consistently defaults to the less interesting of its two lead characters.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The problem for Mr. Krieger is that his film has been trying to dazzle us with all manner of sleight of hand and hokum and now undertakes the construction of a conventional romance. The movie starts spinning its wheels.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Has been described as a "midnight-style musical." And perhaps it should be seen that way, with a crowd of kindred knuckleheads and some moshing in the aisles.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Subtle it is not. Well-intentioned it certainly is. No one but the youngest in the family will care very much about it, though. And they may well be filled with wonderment trying to figure out what this big Babe person is all about.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    White Bird in a Blizzard is an alibi for Mr. Araki to flex his considerable muscle as a visual artist, using a palette that ranges from the blissful to the grotesque, and an atmospheric score by those eminences of the ambient, Harold Budd and Robin Guthrie.

Top Trailers