John Anderson

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For 45 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Anderson's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Planet Earth II
Lowest review score: 30 Power: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 45
  2. Negative: 4 out of 45
45 tv reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    It’s certainly entertaining and well-done but, based on the first two chapters, the viewers are going to have to swallow quite a large helping of implausible sauerkraut to attain their suspension of disbelief.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Dear White People the show has the same problem as “DWP” the movie: a reliance on types rather than characters, on situations rather than storylines. ... It’s comedy. It should be funny (and sometimes is). Does it ultimately get to things that matter, and/or a fresh way of looking at them? There are indications it will, but it was also a bit early to tell.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    To their credit, these cultural tourists get it, and pretty much right away. ... Is nonfiction misery, however antique, the proper stuff of entertainment? There’s some education at work here, of course, but what we really want to see is how far the participants will go before they break.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Blunt Talk is as wildly uneven as it is occasionally brilliant.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Mr. Burns has created a show that is watchable.... but the lack of any rudimentary joy among any of the characters means there’s also no one to like, not during the early episodes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    At no time will the viewer feel that he or she has been transported to 1805 Russia, the drawing rooms of St. Petersburg, or the blood-soaked battlefields of the Napoleonic wars. That said, it’s not entirely a bad time. This is because directed Tom Harper and screenwriter Andrew Davies are far less interested in Tolstoy’s take on the individual’s place in the universe than they are in the who’s-sleeping-with-whom school of world literature and the more sentimental aspects of Tolstoy’s story. Neither are they much interested in subtlety.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The family is Cuban-American. The single mom, Penelope (the excellent Justina Machado of “Six Feet Under”), is ex-military. Hispanic culture is one of the show’s founts of humor--a painful one, in the case of Rita Moreno’s live-in grandma, Lydia. Otherwise, the show is recycled Norman Lear.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The veracity of this series is, in the end, less important than what it says about a culture in which people blithely create online worlds on a collision course with the truth. Schadenfreude may be the lifeblood of reality television, but in "Catfish," it's fairly guilt free.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    True Deetective is both underwritten and over-plotted.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    That no one acts in a manner remotely plausible during Murder in the First, regarding either the law or human life, will have viewers feeling like they're just being moved through the system.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    There’s a kind of joke built into the series, which makes effective use of his sonorous voice and easy-but-earnest style. Unfortunately, Mr. Freeman is also saddled with dialogue that may cause some to lose their faith.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Everyone seems to be imitating someone they saw in another gangster movie. It would be funny, if it weren't quite so tedious.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Derivative to the point of parody.... [But] despite the general lameness of the show, Ms. Henson is so convincing--and charismatic--you might just keep watching.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Spontaneity is scripted; hopes and dreams are meant to be crushed; the woeful are exalted; characters are unsympathetic.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    The program has the depth of a tuna can and is edited so frantically it feels like a trailer for itself. The four stars are basically there to present their well-established personae.

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