John Anderson

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For 217 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Get Low
Lowest review score: 0 Bio-Dome
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 27 out of 217
217 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Ms. McGowan has a wonderful face, and director Jenna Mattison spends a lot of time there. But the effectiveness of The Sound really comes from its atmospherics, which are rich and disturbing and a credit not just to the director but to composer Aaron Gilhuis and the people at Urban Post Production in Toronto.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Each of the five superb actors gets a moment of dramatic glory out of Mr. MacLachlan’s screenplay, which is about guilt, roots and the selfishness of implacable conviction. Each makes the most of it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    A lot of Lucky is philosophical mischief, some of it is tediously ruminative, and some moments achieve a loveliness that belies the film’s craggy desert terrain, the earthiness of its characters and even the landscape of Mr. Stanton’s body.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    American Made is one of the many children of “Goodfellas,” a true-crime story turned first-person narrative told by a charismatic ne’er-do-well surrounded by dubious characters and tantalizing subplots. None of these offspring, including American Made, have matched the chilling grandeur of Martin Scorsese’s 1990 masterpiece, with its multifaceted characters and visual fluidity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Director David Gordon Green, working with screenwriter John Pollono’s adaptation of the book by Mr. Bauman and Bret Witter, maintains a brisk pace. There’s barely a maudlin moment, which is remarkable given the subject matter.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The split screen has a downside: It punctuates the lopsidedness of the script by Anneke Campbell and Will Lamborn, Miguel’s story being far less convincingly written than Mark’s.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    An extremely good-natured, upbeat recounting of the infamous Bobby Riggs-Billie Jean King “man vs. woman” match of 1973.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    It is the library as an urgent idea, and the obligations that the institution’s leaders have embraced, that win Mr. Wiseman’s admiration and attention.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    When the film leaves the realm of the impolite or even criminal for something far more extreme, it achieves a level of excess that makes the whole enterprise increasingly cartoonish, rather than just awful.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    A kind of blues song in its own right, Sidemen: Long Road to Glory is an affectionate attempt to showcase three major figures in the development of Chicago blues, musicians who spent their entire lives eclipsed by the oversized stars they played with.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    It’s hard to make a compelling movie about a character defined by indecision, Hamlet notwithstanding. Ms. Hittman, however, has done it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    The creative process is always an elusive thing for filmmakers to capture, but amid all the startling visuals and the splendid acting, Polina rises, gloriously, to the challenge.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Much of the fun of Marjorie Prime is in figuring out where it’s going, and why. It would be shameful to reveal much more of the journey save to say that the people who make it do a splendid job.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Lemon is all about this pull and push, toward and away from the characters and the movie itself. It’s also one of the more original films in recent memory.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The Hitman’s Bodyguard would have been much funnier because, on paper, Tom O’Connor’s script was probably a scream. What adds to the unevenness of the whole affair is a propensity for extreme violence that just seems incompatible with what is ostensibly a comedy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Ms. Plaza delivers a wide-ranging, nuanced and demanding performance as a mad woman, whose attic is the cellphone.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    As in the previous films, the pilgrims stay in the most picturesque places, and are served the most sumptuous meals, the preparation of which Mr. Winterbottom uses as a visual digestif when his two stars begin to cloy. Most often, though, they are supremely urbane and consistently hilarious.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Containing as much forward motion as any film in recent memory, Good Time is as heartbreaking as it is exhilarating, and that’s no small thing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    War Machine, with a screenplay and direction by David Michod (of 2010’s ferocious “Animal Kingdom”), is a comedy because, as per the old Angela Carter line, it’s tragedy happening to other people. But it’s also a highly accessible examination of why the Afghanistan war couldn’t be won the way we—in the person of Gen. McChrystal—were fighting it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Victoria Day (a very Canadian holiday) is expertly put together, the editing and framing so sturdy and right that the twin currents of the film flow over the viewer unimpeded.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Mr. Von Einsiedel is convinced that his subjects are “true heroes.” Viewers will be convinced of the same.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    [Barry's] search for an identity is the ignition and combustion of the film. The exhaust, however, comes courtesy of Philip Morris. And the odor, like that surrounding the film itself, is of provocation in service of no cogent point.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    Thoroughly entertaining, startling and highly erotic film.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    It shouldn’t seem shocking, but the most interesting thing about this second Cruise-fired action film based on author Lee Child’s nomadic, ex-military hero is its action.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    It’s a masterpiece — an overused word, but not the wrong one.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    It’s a nail-biter, a solid thriller, an immigration-themed takeoff on that old chestnut “The Most Dangerous Game,” in which humans are both predator and prey. It’s not particularly nuanced. In fact, its lack of nuance is its most distinguishing characteristic.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    The characters are really minimalist masterpieces, sculpted, polished and uncompromisingly female.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    An effective and even affecting pop thriller.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The film never quite succeeds, simply because the book’s core virtues do not lend themselves to cinema.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    What Mr. Parker has committed to the screen is a righteously indignant, kinetic and well-acted film — Mr. Parker, as Turner, delivers a fierce, complex performance. At the same time, his film is remarkably conventional. The framing and the camera movements are all very routine, even dated; one would have said it looks like television, before television gained its current lustre.

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