John Anderson
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For 153 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Get Low
Lowest review score: 0 Bio-Dome
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 68 out of 153
  2. Negative: 25 out of 153
153 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    Anderson, who makes as impressive a directing debut as has been seen in some time, creates a perfectly modulated mystery that doesn't even feel like one. It's a character play, and Hall, Reilly and Paltrow are so convincingly damaged they take on the properties of fine china.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    Felix (Duvall) simply wants to host his own goodbye, maybe have a band, and the reasons why are the reasons Get Low is essential viewing. That, and the acting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    The pulp-fictional hero is inhabited by the charismatic Andy Lau who, together with Chinese stars Bingbing Li, Ms. Lau and Tony Leung Ka-fai, makes Detective Dee the most purely entertaining film of our vanishing summer.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Kon's best work yet.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    One of the assets of Stranger Things is its air of mystery, and the actors give the indelible impression that they have much locked away inside.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The deliriously talented Lake Bell wrote, produced, directed and stars in this peculiar bit of comedy magic, set amid the cutthroat world of Hollywood voiceover artists.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Years after its initial release, Ornette: Made in America, part of Milestone's continuing "Project Shirley," still feels fresh - its moves always surprising, yet always somehow perfect.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Frances Ha also marks the rare instance in which an actress has the perfect role at the perfect time. Ms. Gerwig's work here is fragile, delicate, subject to bruising; something that could wither under too much attention. Perhaps Ms. Gerwig is the greatest actress alive. And maybe Frances Ha is just the ghost orchid of independent cinema.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Frank is a genuine original in a summer sea of sameness, and a darkly comedic manifesto against the cultural status quo.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Director David Mackenzie's gripping, convincing and convincingly violent convict drama owes its authenticity largely to the experiences of ex-prison therapist Jonathan Asser, who wrote its screenplay. But the opening 10 minutes are a virtuosic example of virtually wordless filmmaking.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    So refreshing and funny and, in its way, sophisticated.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Gracefully bittersweet and balanced. [16 April 1999, Calendar, p.F-1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Something about Eklavya: The Royal Guard suggests a lost film by David Lean. With some muted echoes of "Hamlet." And a whiff of "Rigoletto."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    While much of The World Before Her speaks to global womanhood, other aspects are more specific to India, but that’s what gives the film much of its life and spark.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    A mood piece, a character study and an exercise in poetic gesture possessed of a sort of evanescent, secular spirituality.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Like the film itself, Porter’s handful of devoted, charismatic attorneys do a righteous job of reminding people that the accused are innocent until proven guilty, and that the criminal justice system seems otherwise disposed.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The Square is journalism, but Noujaim’s agenda is greater than mere reportage.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Anita may be a tribute doc, but it’s one with real heft.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    With a mood and setting worthy of a murder story by Jack London, this audience-friendly, atmospheric work could be remade as a thriller, although that’s really what it is already.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The source of all this information was a real-life KGB agent, Vladimir Vetrov, code named Farewell, and with the usual adjustments for drama his story gets a respectable retelling in this nervy French production.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    It's a trip into a primordial world and primeval sensibilities, and if you're looking to shake off the mall-movie blahs, there are few better places to look.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The common problem of Solondz's characters is an inability to see the world in shades of grey, which is fitting in a film where color-garish, boring or just plain ugly-is so important, and the actors are working off palettes of such extreme emotions. A few of them-notably Ms. Rampling, Mr. Hinds and Ms. Sheedy-are as good here as they've ever been.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    A delicious thriller that gets under the skin à la "All About Eve," albeit with a twist: The craft here is still theater, but of the workplace rather than the stage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The truth is, Mr. Farina would be considered Oscar material if "Joe May" were a bigger film. As it is, he'll have to settle for being great.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Ms. Israel's movie proves, once again, that the best nonfiction cinema possesses the same attributes as good fiction: Strong characters, conflict, story arc, visual style.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    With Mr. Harrelson, Mr. Moverman has created an antihero of epic proportions and indiscretions.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    What makes this nominee for the best-foreign-film Oscar singular among Holocaust movies is the way it characterizes the banality of life underground.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Conventional it is not. Engrossing it is.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The situation is fascinating, and given an illuminating investigation here.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The scope of the subject is such that when Mr. Jarecki's voiceover cuts into the narrative, imposing a personal angle on the national story, it reduces the sense of significance its creator aimed for. But that's a fairly backhanded endorsement of a very potent movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Soko is terrific, but it is Mr. Lindon who delivers the performance of the film, his internalized consternation amounting to an eloquent dispatch from the war between the sexes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    There's a near-sacred history in Hollywood of non-U.S.- born directors providing fresh perspectives on America. Miloš Forman. Alfred Hitchcock. Ang Lee. Ernst Lubitsch. Billy Wilder. For Prisoners, a stress-inducing trip into child abduction, the director is Quebecois filmmaker Denis Villeneuve, who gives us an American "hero" guaranteed to push many buttons, many times, and who might not have been allowed to be quite so awful, under a different director's lens.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    "Witty and brisk" is not the name of a French breakfast cereal, but it does describe a certain brand of French film, the type that coquettishly flirts with comedy while sprinting in the direction of dry, sophisticated charm. Such is Haute Cuisine.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Martin is marvelous; through sheer charisma, he takes over certain scenes as if no one else is there.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    A virulent but thoroughly entertaining trilogy of tales about the besieged lower classes of Edinburgh, ripe with vulgarity, self-loathing, violence and economic disorder.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    It's weird, wacky territory you enter in The Price of Milk, and we don't just mean New Zealand.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The trick is getting from a conclusion made five minutes into a movie to an ending 90 minutes away. It can be a scary prospect. In The Sweetest Thing it is mostly a hoot.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    In addition to its terrifically bratty performance by the epically bratty Posey, House of Yes contains some of the smarter (and smarter-assed) writing of the year.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The special effects are effective and aggressive, although one might occasionally confuse a divine vortex with a flushed toilet.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    What she finds is good for her and good for us -- a journey of realization for anyone who's ever felt lost in the crowd.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    To resort to strictly ethnocentric references, Fanaa is equal parts MGM extravaganza, Shakespeare lite and James Bond. In their heart of hearts, isn't that what movie audiences really want?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Following Woody Allen, Ang Lee and any number of sitcoms, Georgia Lee constructs her well-shot, well-written film around three daughters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Odd, funny film.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Steven Soderbergh takes Gray (who appeared in his little-appreciated gem "King of the Hill") places he's never been on-screen. Motion, color and brazen stylizing enhance what is at times a genuinely hysterical work on rationalized terror.[9 May 1997, p.F12]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    [The Kings of Summer] is much more interested in the laughs that can be mined from character rather than plot. Galletta’s script, Vogt-Roberts’ direction and the distinctive play of the actors, notably Offerman and Mullally, lets the viewer know who everyone is right away, and the gag lines flow.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Helmers Mike Lerner and Maxim Pozdorovkin... don’t quite get to the issues behind the trio’s infamous performance at the historic Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow last year, but the young women’s vulnerability and defiance make for stirring viewing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Despite its dubious inhabitants, the film consistently entertains by throwing the kinds of curves one should see coming but doesn’t.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Some parts of the film are drily academic, but much of it is quite beautiful and artfully put together by the director.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The screenwriter/playwrights have processed the characters’ last words in ways that imbue them with as much humanity as possible.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    People might have laughed at the old Jack Rebney, but they were laughing at themselves as well. And counting their blessings. Everyone has a cranky side. Unlike Mr. Rebney's, it isn't usually gawked at by 20 million people.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Directors Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini show the same appreciation for eccentrics and humanity they brought to "American Splendor" and Mr. Dano's Louis is a delicately wrought wonder.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    This is a movie about longing, desire, desperation and the abandonment of principle - quite a collection of themes, all universal.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film is almost distractingly beautiful to look at, something that accentuates the tension between the film's conflicting quantities, i.e., the glories of the physical world, and the corrupted humanity it hosts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Goofily funny, and silly, and in many ways follows the currents of contemporary comedy into the gulf stream of inanity. And yet Ned turns out to be a strangely moving figure, a comic foil worthy of affection, perhaps even respect.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Mr. Carnahan has till now been pigeonholed, and rightly, by comedy shoot-'em-ups like "Smokin' Aces" and "The A-Team." But here he is with The Grey - certainly an adventure film but one with a spiritual ingredient that is both surprising and fiercely resonant.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film benefits enormously from having the luminous Rebecca Hall as its lead. It also gains an ominous gravity from the haunted, wounded and wobbly England in which it's set.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Lawless is one of those films that, through seeming serendipity, has a cast that defines its moment. There have been others - "The Breakfast Club," "The Godfather" and "Silverado," to name one irrelevant and two relevant examples. But Lawless really lucked out.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Sleepwalk With Me makes the subject palatable, funny and maybe even touching.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Likely to create considerable nervous tension among viewers who think they've seen this all before. They haven't.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film grows increasingly mirthful as the characters come into focus, and the casting is the key: Ms. Garner, who also helped produce the film, has a gift for catty roles, and Ms. Wilde is so funny she should play hookers all the time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Noisy, frenetic, grandiose and essentially a soap opera, director J.J. Abrams's second contribution to the franchise has everything, including romance: Never before have Capt. James T. Kirk and his Vulcan antagonist, Mr. Spock, seemed so very much in love.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Mr. Damon brings both a weary optimism and convincing physicality to Max, who is no revolutionary. He just wants to live, and is willing to don an exoskeletal combat suit and fight robots to do it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Guaranteed to fan antigovernment sentiments among its audiences, Dinosaur 13 is less about paleontology than it is about prosecutorial overreach, political gamesmanship, dinosaur swindlers and true crime — if in fact crimes were even committed, and/or committed by the people accused.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The taste with which one is left is not savory, exactly, but it certainly lingers.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    While the movie's star -- and ruler, and ship's captain, and grand poobah -- is Haneke himself, his actors are sublime.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 John Anderson
    Despite a certain emotional chill, what holds this Mechanic together is - no surprise - the core Carlino story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Although Born Romantic is sweetly intentioned and staunchly on the side of love, it meanders long to enough to alienate whatever affection it otherwise earns.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Veber, also responsible for "The Dinner Game," apparently has a finger on the pulse of French audiences and Gallic-minded Americans, but there's just not a lot of freshness in this Closet.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    A trashy little movie about drinking, football and drinking, is also one of those films that pretends to moralize about the very behavior it milks for every giggle it can get.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Hyams the director ("Sudden Death," "Timecop," "The Star Chamber") operates at too much of a fevered pitch for things not to eventually get out of hand -- accelerating violence and horror eventually hit maximum velocity and warp into nonsense, no matter how erudite the script.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    It's not that the movie is never funny. It's just that you don't feel very good when it is.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    But as Isaac, Rifkin is simply transcendent, giving what is the most accomplished performance of the year. He does not, however, have a completely successful movie around him.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Exposes director Khan's stage roots -- he has no feel for the close-up, although his use of the frame itself, and negative space, is occasionally thrilling.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    It's doubtful Milarepa will be opening in Beijing any time soon; all the more reason it deserves a look.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    What keeps Ain’t in It for My Health from being a really satisfying portrait isn’t a lack of access, but a lack of intimacy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    What may feel like Mr. Sfar's indulgences are sometimes just that, but one could hardly make an honest movie about Gainsbourg that wasn't as recklessly ambitious as this.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    The ending, for instance, is so ridiculously tidy it squeaks. But en route to its kitchen-sink climax, "Man" manages to both amuse and provoke, to cleave to convention and promote ideas.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    The landscape is dire, the architecture is haunted, children disappear by the dozens and antique toys inexplicably spark to life. That Mr. Radcliffe doesn't is part of the problem.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    It is Mr. Kinnear's slippery charm that keeps Thin Ice from sinking into the frosty Wisconsin slush toward which it seems to be heading from the start.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Writer-director Andrew Okpeaha MacLean, who in his feature debut has lashed together a sturdy vehicle for unadorned morality and pragmatic justice.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Less magical is the blind adherence to formula evident in most of Taken 2. As they might say in the advertising department, it's an adrenaline-fueled thrill ride. But it could have been much more.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    One of the brighter aspects of Life of Crime, which otherwise ambles along good naturedly, is the casting.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    A greatest-hits collection of plot devices and emotional cues from such films as "Gorillas in the Mist" and "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," making it something of a trained chimp, one that apes a lot of good movies while making itself look ridiculous.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Go see it. But you'll feel cheap in the morning.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The difficulty is that Brassed Off operates at an emotional pitch that starts at a crescendo and never relents--rendering almost everything equally inconsequential.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Director Les Mayfield ("Miracle on 34th Street") has his moments, of course, but what ultimately was needed in the case of Flubber was a movie with more bounce and less talk.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Likké should be applauded for tackling a subject that's bristling with sociopolitical thorns and that raises some provocative questions, particularly about what we find attractive in other people and why.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    While Amma's teachings of love, inner peace and Karma, or action, resonate in the film -- obviously, Amma is a woman called to God -- her background remains pretty much a mystery. Less National Geographic and more personal history would have added a dimension to "Darshan."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Subtle it is not. Well-intentioned it certainly is. No one but the youngest in the family will care very much about it, though. And they may well be filled with wonderment trying to figure out what this big Babe person is all about.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The most profound thing the remarkably dread-filled drama Day Night Day Night tells us is what it doesn't tell us.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The cast is really fine, but the script requires a lot of hard swallowing. The story moves along briskly and colorfully but gets further and further from the intimate atmosphere that initially makes it so appealing. [25 Apr 1997]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Not as bad as it sounds nor as good as it might have been.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    A movie that commits sins of excess, except regarding Thornton. There's not nearly enough of him.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    By convoluting the various planes of experience, by overlapping and obscuring ostensible realities and ostensible dreams, Mr. Nolan deprives us the opportunity of investing emotionally in any of it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Mr. Nixey is doing an Alfred Hitchcock homage within a movie lacking anything as subversive, or skilled, as Hitchcock.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Any self-respecting period piece, historical drama or even caper movie - and The Debt is all three - balances issues of global significance with interpersonal drama. The problem here is that the personal eclipses the global. The stakes are too low.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The type of film with which Mr. Ratner has claimed to be infatuated is itself like a caper - it requires precise execution. Tower Heist is more like that 10-story Snoopy, as he drunkenly bobs along Central Park West.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Doesn't the reigning genius of the German language deserve his own "Shakespeare in Love"? Sure. But as Goethe scampers about Leipzig, comically failing his doctoral exam, spilling his books and looking bemused, young Johann might as well be auditioning for his own Disney Channel program.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Safe House is a sturdy enough thriller, but one that consistently defaults to the less interesting of its two lead characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    One of the reasons documentaries often take so long to make is the filmmakers' need to keep their subject from giving a performance. They want something genuine, something that materializes only when the camera disappears. Nothing Mr. Courtney is says is inaccurate or, God knows, dishonest. But it isn't quite true either.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Does it all have to be so tedious? To the movie's credit, many of the inside jokes are pretty funny, and Mr. Lundgren is close to hilarious as a dissipated Swede named Gunner.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    It's a purely sensory journey until the pictures start making editorial comments, in slaughterhouses and garbage dumps.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    There aren't many bright spots in Lovelace, although one is Amanda Seyfried's intoxicating smile, and another is the retinal insult delivered by a 16mm projector flaring out at the audience during the movie's opening moments, and which feels like an accusation. It's the odd film that indicts you just for watching. But Lovelace is an eccentric piece of cinema, made by unlikely people.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    For all its immersion in the roar, grease and danger of Formula One, the fact-based Rush — about the sport's great rivalry of the 1970s — is also more predictable than a pit stop, something well-suited to Mr. Howard. He's made perfectly palatable pictures, but never a truly great one, partly because he has such a weakness for the commercial and a consequent gift for the obvious.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    What's so unfunny about peace, love and understanding? Plenty, it turns out. But for much of the movie, viewers will be asking themselves where the conflict is. And, by extension, the drama.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Even as Cecil lives his life slightly adjacent to history, building a heroic film around him requires herculean effort.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    A goofball movie, in the way "Malkovich" was, but it tries too hard.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    There's not enough sustained musical momentum to simulate the energy of an actual rave; the characters are likable but unremarkable.
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    This is a movie for younger children -- they won't notice that the children deliver their lines with all the conviction of an airline flight boarding announcement.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    The assumption among many when the movie was postponed was that Paramount Classics felt New Yorkers weren't emotionally equipped for something bright or frothy or vivacious. They needn't have been concerned.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    Proyas is trying simultaneously to create a pure thriller and sci-fi nightmare along with his tongue-in-cheek critique of artifice. And this doesn't work out quite so well.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    Reitman's attempt to show he can re-create the success of his biggest comedy ever. What he proves instead is that, given time and money, a comedy director can devolve into a lower life form.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    Follows a leadenly predictable path that will be more than familiar to anyone who's seen a recent sports movie, or any Sandler movie.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    It only serves to remind one of better movies, at a time when one needs no reminders.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    Does for industrialists, politicians, pro-football owners and lawyers what Christopher Guest's "Best in Show' did for dog owners -- but without the skewer.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    The go-for-broke plot twists are daring, but because there's no sense of background to the characters, one gets the sense it's all being made up as Baigelman goes along.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    Ultimately, Supercross is an example of how too much of anything will get annoying -- including VVRRRROOOOOOOMMM and flying bikes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    That this is the first film for director Joe Mantello, who was nominated for a Tony for directing the stage version, may be compounding the problem. But frankly, if someone wanted to do a parody of a gay film like this, it's hard to imagine the sloganeering being much different.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    The only thing left unsliced is the ham in BloodRayne, yet another video game adaptation by German genre specialist Uwe Boll and a movie with more fading - or faded - talent than an Italian basketball team.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    Stay Alive spends a lot of time inside the video game system, and what will terrify the audience very early on is the realization that there's better acting in the video game than on the big screen.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    A sad farewell to the promising Project Greenlight concept, this Feast leaves viewers with nothing satisfying to tuck into.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    The movie thus moves from truly creepy to truly inane, which is, unfortunately, all too common in films of this ilk.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    A documentary as messy as the movement it tries to portray, 99%: The Occupy Wall Street Collaborative Film possesses energy, passion and about a dozen documentaries inside it yearning to breathe free.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    The island locale rings with reggae music regardless of its proximity to Jamaica, and any action sequence is rendered in painfully deliberate slo-mo.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    In their engaging, fast-paced and ultimately ludicrous combo of espionage and mayhem, the makers of The November Man give us a very Putin-like villain in Arkady Federov (veteran Serbian actor Lazar Ristovski).
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 John Anderson
    Cinema-as-shoplifting is okay, as long as you still get the feeling it's for a greater good. But that's something The Tourist is sorely missing.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    The emotional aspects of the story are treated with such a heavy hand, the supernatural aspects are so vague and uninvolving, and the group dynamic is so unconvincing that one can't quite imagine why anybody bothered.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    The voyeuristic indulgences of a middle-aged filmmaker playing out his most deep-seated and unresolved sexual fantasies and anxieties.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Has been described as a "midnight-style musical." And perhaps it should be seen that way, with a crowd of kindred knuckleheads and some moshing in the aisles.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    So mild, so benign, its humiliation-to-vindication are so predictable and its old-folks jokes so feeble.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    You have to be a bit of an arrested adolescent to think "Larry" is funny.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Redline isn't exactly a car wreck, mainly because it's far less exciting, and you can, in fact, look away. Perhaps at your shoes.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    It's a movie on the wrong side side of the so-bad-it's-good line.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Pathetically unfunny most of the time.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Despite all the nervous tension, the central drama is flawed - Jonathan isn't trying to find a killer. He is the killer. Something is lacking in the dramatic equation.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    As an experiment in Academy Award psychology, Albert Nobbs is fascinating. As drama? It is, forgive us, a drag.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    "Wolverine" is full of angst, and yet has had virtually all the soul wrung out of it in an effort to create a live-action cartoon. But cartoons are rarely so unwieldy, or force a director -- in this case, the largely unsung Gavin Hood -- to juggle so much impossible plotline.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 John Anderson
    Spears acquits herself as well as anyone might, in a movie as contrived and lazy as this one.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 20 John Anderson
    It's an awfully confusing journey, unless you're of pro-Digi-ous intelligence. Or a digimaniac. Or just 6.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 John Anderson
    The two leads are unappealing, the story is dragged on for days and the rather random magical element renders any human factor irrelevant..
    • 14 Metascore
    • 20 John Anderson
    Whalin is awful, Birch is saddled with lines that would make a silent film star blanch and Irons devours huge chunks of scenery with the ferocity of one of those dog-fighting dragons.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 John Anderson
    The best advice to give anyone who wants to see Species II--other than "don't go!"--is "don't eat!"
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 John Anderson
    If Aeon Flux is what Charlize Theron does to pay the bills while otherwise being engaged in "Monster" and "North Country," it's probably a reasonable price to pay. For her. For us? No, no, no.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 John Anderson
    Ricki Lake, who occupies one of the lower links on the TV trash-talk food chain, is promoted to ugly duckling in Mrs. Winterbourne, a film that waddles through the movie-memory super-mart shoplifting everything but charm.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 John Anderson
    The director's apparent blindness to the epic banality of her subjects suggests that the whole project is one royally misguided mess.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 10 John Anderson
    If nothing else, Gummo does challenge perceptions and presumptions: Is the perspective of youth in this country really so devoid of significance, and their existence so septic? These are good questions, although "Gummo" provides neither answer nor solution, nor even thematic cohesion.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 10 John Anderson
    Fredrik Bond’s direction and Matt Drake’s screenplay deliver a charisma-free trip into a world of gratuitous violence, contrivances and tedium.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 10 John Anderson
    Shockingly, the kind of cringe-inducing material upon which Mr. Mazer has built a career as a writer for Sacha Baron Cohen ("Bruno," "Borat," "Da Ali G Show") doesn't work when rendered by types who could have been cast in "Notting Hill" (someone even makes a Hugh Grant joke). It's rather close to excruciating.
    • 1 Metascore
    • 0 John Anderson
    [Shore] seems convinced that the antics of his retarded persona amount to some manner of postmodernist anti-comedy and this makes the resultant boredom seem all the more pathetic.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 0 John Anderson
    • Los Angeles Times