For 72 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Get Low
Lowest review score: 10 Charlie Countryman
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 45 out of 72
  2. Negative: 6 out of 72
72 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    Felix (Duvall) simply wants to host his own goodbye, maybe have a band, and the reasons why are the reasons Get Low is essential viewing. That, and the acting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    The pulp-fictional hero is inhabited by the charismatic Andy Lau who, together with Chinese stars Bingbing Li, Ms. Lau and Tony Leung Ka-fai, makes Detective Dee the most purely entertaining film of our vanishing summer.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Years after its initial release, Ornette: Made in America, part of Milestone's continuing "Project Shirley," still feels fresh - its moves always surprising, yet always somehow perfect.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Frances Ha also marks the rare instance in which an actress has the perfect role at the perfect time. Ms. Gerwig's work here is fragile, delicate, subject to bruising; something that could wither under too much attention. Perhaps Ms. Gerwig is the greatest actress alive. And maybe Frances Ha is just the ghost orchid of independent cinema.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    One of the assets of Stranger Things is its air of mystery, and the actors give the indelible impression that they have much locked away inside.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The deliriously talented Lake Bell wrote, produced, directed and stars in this peculiar bit of comedy magic, set amid the cutthroat world of Hollywood voiceover artists.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The source of all this information was a real-life KGB agent, Vladimir Vetrov, code named Farewell, and with the usual adjustments for drama his story gets a respectable retelling in this nervy French production.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The common problem of Solondz's characters is an inability to see the world in shades of grey, which is fitting in a film where color-garish, boring or just plain ugly-is so important, and the actors are working off palettes of such extreme emotions. A few of them-notably Ms. Rampling, Mr. Hinds and Ms. Sheedy-are as good here as they've ever been.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    It's a trip into a primordial world and primeval sensibilities, and if you're looking to shake off the mall-movie blahs, there are few better places to look.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    A delicious thriller that gets under the skin à la "All About Eve," albeit with a twist: The craft here is still theater, but of the workplace rather than the stage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The truth is, Mr. Farina would be considered Oscar material if "Joe May" were a bigger film. As it is, he'll have to settle for being great.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    With Mr. Harrelson, Mr. Moverman has created an antihero of epic proportions and indiscretions.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    What makes this nominee for the best-foreign-film Oscar singular among Holocaust movies is the way it characterizes the banality of life underground.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Ms. Israel's movie proves, once again, that the best nonfiction cinema possesses the same attributes as good fiction: Strong characters, conflict, story arc, visual style.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Conventional it is not. Engrossing it is.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The situation is fascinating, and given an illuminating investigation here.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The scope of the subject is such that when Mr. Jarecki's voiceover cuts into the narrative, imposing a personal angle on the national story, it reduces the sense of significance its creator aimed for. But that's a fairly backhanded endorsement of a very potent movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    There's a near-sacred history in Hollywood of non-U.S.- born directors providing fresh perspectives on America. Miloš Forman. Alfred Hitchcock. Ang Lee. Ernst Lubitsch. Billy Wilder. For Prisoners, a stress-inducing trip into child abduction, the director is Quebecois filmmaker Denis Villeneuve, who gives us an American "hero" guaranteed to push many buttons, many times, and who might not have been allowed to be quite so awful, under a different director's lens.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    "Witty and brisk" is not the name of a French breakfast cereal, but it does describe a certain brand of French film, the type that coquettishly flirts with comedy while sprinting in the direction of dry, sophisticated charm. Such is Haute Cuisine.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    While much of The World Before Her speaks to global womanhood, other aspects are more specific to India, but that’s what gives the film much of its life and spark.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Soko is terrific, but it is Mr. Lindon who delivers the performance of the film, his internalized consternation amounting to an eloquent dispatch from the war between the sexes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    A mood piece, a character study and an exercise in poetic gesture possessed of a sort of evanescent, secular spirituality.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Like the film itself, Porter’s handful of devoted, charismatic attorneys do a righteous job of reminding people that the accused are innocent until proven guilty, and that the criminal justice system seems otherwise disposed.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The Square is journalism, but Noujaim’s agenda is greater than mere reportage.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Anita may be a tribute doc, but it’s one with real heft.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    People might have laughed at the old Jack Rebney, but they were laughing at themselves as well. And counting their blessings. Everyone has a cranky side. Unlike Mr. Rebney's, it isn't usually gawked at by 20 million people.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Directors Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini show the same appreciation for eccentrics and humanity they brought to "American Splendor" and Mr. Dano's Louis is a delicately wrought wonder.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film is almost distractingly beautiful to look at, something that accentuates the tension between the film's conflicting quantities, i.e., the glories of the physical world, and the corrupted humanity it hosts.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film grows increasingly mirthful as the characters come into focus, and the casting is the key: Ms. Garner, who also helped produce the film, has a gift for catty roles, and Ms. Wilde is so funny she should play hookers all the time.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Goofily funny, and silly, and in many ways follows the currents of contemporary comedy into the gulf stream of inanity. And yet Ned turns out to be a strangely moving figure, a comic foil worthy of affection, perhaps even respect.