For 72 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame
Lowest review score: 10 Charlie Countryman
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 45 out of 72
  2. Negative: 6 out of 72
72 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    People might have laughed at the old Jack Rebney, but they were laughing at themselves as well. And counting their blessings. Everyone has a cranky side. Unlike Mr. Rebney's, it isn't usually gawked at by 20 million people.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Directors Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini show the same appreciation for eccentrics and humanity they brought to "American Splendor" and Mr. Dano's Louis is a delicately wrought wonder.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    This is a movie about longing, desire, desperation and the abandonment of principle - quite a collection of themes, all universal.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film is almost distractingly beautiful to look at, something that accentuates the tension between the film's conflicting quantities, i.e., the glories of the physical world, and the corrupted humanity it hosts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Goofily funny, and silly, and in many ways follows the currents of contemporary comedy into the gulf stream of inanity. And yet Ned turns out to be a strangely moving figure, a comic foil worthy of affection, perhaps even respect.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Mr. Carnahan has till now been pigeonholed, and rightly, by comedy shoot-'em-ups like "Smokin' Aces" and "The A-Team." But here he is with The Grey - certainly an adventure film but one with a spiritual ingredient that is both surprising and fiercely resonant.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film benefits enormously from having the luminous Rebecca Hall as its lead. It also gains an ominous gravity from the haunted, wounded and wobbly England in which it's set.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Lawless is one of those films that, through seeming serendipity, has a cast that defines its moment. There have been others - "The Breakfast Club," "The Godfather" and "Silverado," to name one irrelevant and two relevant examples. But Lawless really lucked out.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Sleepwalk With Me makes the subject palatable, funny and maybe even touching.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Likely to create considerable nervous tension among viewers who think they've seen this all before. They haven't.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    The film grows increasingly mirthful as the characters come into focus, and the casting is the key: Ms. Garner, who also helped produce the film, has a gift for catty roles, and Ms. Wilde is so funny she should play hookers all the time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Noisy, frenetic, grandiose and essentially a soap opera, director J.J. Abrams's second contribution to the franchise has everything, including romance: Never before have Capt. James T. Kirk and his Vulcan antagonist, Mr. Spock, seemed so very much in love.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Mr. Damon brings both a weary optimism and convincing physicality to Max, who is no revolutionary. He just wants to live, and is willing to don an exoskeletal combat suit and fight robots to do it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    What keeps Ain’t in It for My Health from being a really satisfying portrait isn’t a lack of access, but a lack of intimacy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    What may feel like Mr. Sfar's indulgences are sometimes just that, but one could hardly make an honest movie about Gainsbourg that wasn't as recklessly ambitious as this.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    The ending, for instance, is so ridiculously tidy it squeaks. But en route to its kitchen-sink climax, "Man" manages to both amuse and provoke, to cleave to convention and promote ideas.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    The landscape is dire, the architecture is haunted, children disappear by the dozens and antique toys inexplicably spark to life. That Mr. Radcliffe doesn't is part of the problem.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    It is Mr. Kinnear's slippery charm that keeps Thin Ice from sinking into the frosty Wisconsin slush toward which it seems to be heading from the start.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Writer-director Andrew Okpeaha MacLean, who in his feature debut has lashed together a sturdy vehicle for unadorned morality and pragmatic justice.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Less magical is the blind adherence to formula evident in most of Taken 2. As they might say in the advertising department, it's an adrenaline-fueled thrill ride. But it could have been much more.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    By convoluting the various planes of experience, by overlapping and obscuring ostensible realities and ostensible dreams, Mr. Nolan deprives us the opportunity of investing emotionally in any of it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Mr. Nixey is doing an Alfred Hitchcock homage within a movie lacking anything as subversive, or skilled, as Hitchcock.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Any self-respecting period piece, historical drama or even caper movie - and The Debt is all three - balances issues of global significance with interpersonal drama. The problem here is that the personal eclipses the global. The stakes are too low.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The type of film with which Mr. Ratner has claimed to be infatuated is itself like a caper - it requires precise execution. Tower Heist is more like that 10-story Snoopy, as he drunkenly bobs along Central Park West.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Doesn't the reigning genius of the German language deserve his own "Shakespeare in Love"? Sure. But as Goethe scampers about Leipzig, comically failing his doctoral exam, spilling his books and looking bemused, young Johann might as well be auditioning for his own Disney Channel program.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Safe House is a sturdy enough thriller, but one that consistently defaults to the less interesting of its two lead characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    One of the reasons documentaries often take so long to make is the filmmakers' need to keep their subject from giving a performance. They want something genuine, something that materializes only when the camera disappears. Nothing Mr. Courtney is says is inaccurate or, God knows, dishonest. But it isn't quite true either.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Does it all have to be so tedious? To the movie's credit, many of the inside jokes are pretty funny, and Mr. Lundgren is close to hilarious as a dissipated Swede named Gunner.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    It's a purely sensory journey until the pictures start making editorial comments, in slaughterhouses and garbage dumps.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    There aren't many bright spots in Lovelace, although one is Amanda Seyfried's intoxicating smile, and another is the retinal insult delivered by a 16mm projector flaring out at the audience during the movie's opening moments, and which feels like an accusation. It's the odd film that indicts you just for watching. But Lovelace is an eccentric piece of cinema, made by unlikely people.