For 370 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John DeFore's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Before Midnight
Lowest review score: 10 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 370
370 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    If the premise isn't as attention-grabbing as Rubber's was, the execution should help build the filmmaker's following.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Viewers will surely have their curiosity piqued, but may not walk out convinced of Jobriath's place in the pop Pantheon.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    The film offers a privileged perspective on crucial moments in Johnny Cash's career, and serious fans will likely warm to it on the small screen.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Charming at times but surprisingly cheap-feeling given the cast Heckerling has assembled.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    Newfoundland-set comedy is formulaic but pleasing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    A solid primer that augments exposition with a powerful sensual streak, Mark Hall's Sushi: The Global Catch aims to be a comprehensive look at the raw-fish phenomenon.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 John DeFore
    Choosing it for his debut as director, Bateman demonstrates the same knack for timing and fine shadings of attitude as he does onscreen.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Money for Nothing feels less prophetic than generally handwringing -- it's just enough to produce vague worry in the unschooled without moving policymakers to do anything they're not already doing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    A gore-for-broke affair that strips the flesh off Sam Raimi's cult-beloved comic-horror franchise and exposes the demons at its core.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 John DeFore
    The Story of Luke suffers all the flaws associated with disability films and more. Familiar faces in the cast may attract notice in niche bookings, but no one involved will benefit from the exposure.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Modest but revealing documentary.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 John DeFore
    A character-driven take on true-crime fare, Alex Karpovsky's Rubberneck marks a solid dramatic turn for a filmmaker best known for playing comedic parts in indie films like "Tiny Furniture."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Nelson's amiable comedy occasionally gets fixated on things that don't serve its overall purpose and is too self-conscious to really shine. But it's a more competent, accessible film than its stealthy theatrical release suggests.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Art doc's stylistic quirks detract slightly from a sometimes fascinating portrait.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Despite a premise with broad appeal and a script boasting plenty of laughs among its misfires, the high school fable falters.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Although Weigert is convincing as Abby, Passon's attitude toward the character is hazy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    A niche theatrical run might draw fans of Goldthwait's previous work, this effort isn't likely to get as much help from critics as those sometimes did.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    The doc has little to say about the Michelin ranking system that hasn't been said, but offers enough behind-the-scenes interest to entertain foodies and inspire a few additions to their dining-experience bucket lists.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    A clever DIY comedy that could be this year's "Humpday" for art house audiences in search of characters they recognize from their own lives.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    The audience it manages to reach will find it as vicerally satisfying as a doc on this subject can be.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    More a tone poem or gallery installation piece than a verite outing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    Though Carell and Rudd are both saddled with characters that just aren't as interesting as many they've played in the past, the movie benefits from having drawn many gifted comedians to supporting roles.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    Though its even-tempered account may be more thorough than print and TV coverage at the time, the doc doesn't offer anything dramatic enough to draw many eyeballs at this late date.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    A feel-good raunch-com whose dirty-talk plot comes from a convincingly female perspective instead of feeling like cut-and-paste Apatow.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    The picture survives its excesses thanks to winning chemistry between stars Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg, who animate banter-heavy dialogue and click so well one wonders why they haven't shared the screen before.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    Despite the story's elements of suspense, loss and determination, though, the picture has a mundane, low-stakes vibe that fails to make the most of its inspirational content.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 John DeFore
    A portrait of the short-lived artist that will move fans while letting the uninitiated witness enough onstage highlights to leave them wanting more.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    The film will frustrate viewers who insist on knowing which interviewees are recounting real experiences and which are perpetuating fictions hatched by the game's creator, Jeff Hull. But mystery is part of the appeal.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 John DeFore
    A commendably restrained loser-turns-winner tale offering an unexpected second showcase for Terri star Jacob Wysocki, Matthew Lillard's Fat Kid Rules the World is less colorful than its grandeur-deluded title suggests.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 John DeFore
    In his 4:44 Last Day on Earth, the auteur imagines the apocalypse from an aging NYC hipster's perspective, hitting melancholy notes that may ring true for a small segment of the art-house audience but, without the compelling presence of Willem Dafoe, would have little hope at the box office.