For 41 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John J. O'Connor's Scores

  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Kids in the Hall: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 Full House: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 25 out of 41
  2. Negative: 2 out of 41
41 tv reviews
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 John J. O'Connor
    When a series starts off great and just keeps getting better, it's television-classic time. And as "The Larry Sanders Show" racks up its fifth 13-week season, that's precisely what is happening on HBO.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 John J. O'Connor
    The sitcom doesn't get any better than this. ... Over the last year... 'Murphy Brown' has evolved from a clearly promising idea... into a landmark series.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 John J. O'Connor
    Here is some of the freshest and most disarming material the comedy scene has been able to claim in a long while.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 John J. O'Connor
    'Roseanne' is off to a terrifically hilarious start.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 John J. O'Connor
    Deadpan lunacy has never worked better for Mr. Shandling and his splendidly merry gang of featured players. [22 Jun 1994]
    • 99 Metascore
    • 90 John J. O'Connor
    As cheerfully goofy and bizarrely on target as ever. [19 Jul 1995]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 John J. O'Connor
    The year's most substantial new series. [7 Oct 1991]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 John J. O'Connor
    This new version of Murder One is not as taut as the original. But it is more focused. And even though it lacks Stanley Tucci and his mesmerizing performance of last season, it has a strong cast and the occasional clever gambit, most notably Ralph Waite, the fine actor still best known as Papa Walton, depicting a subtly menacing power behind the urban scenes. I've seen the first two episodes. I'm hooked.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    There is, admittedly, a fine line between being hilariously perceptive and just plain, even objectionably, silly. While habitually teetering on that line, 'The Simpsons' has shown a remarkable ability to come down on the right side most of the time.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    With some delicious comic touches, Quantum Leap is slyly offering two cheers for the "sensitized" man of the 1980's. Sam even managed to phone his beloved father, who had died in 1974. The experience left him with tears streaming down his face. Mr. Bakula (''Eisenhower & Lutz,'' Broadway's ''Romance Romance'') pulls all of this off with skillful charm. He could easily get away with devouring an entire quiche. [30 Mar 1989, p.C24]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    There's a shrewd madness in this straight-faced satire. [2 Jun 1993]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    The supporting cast... is strong. And the star is wonderful. ... There's a nice urban, smart-alecky tone to ''Murphy Brown.'' Now it's up to the scriptwriters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    This inventive sitcom is hilarious.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    It can be shamelessly sentimental and, at least in this sensitively crafted introduction written and directed by Mr. Goldberg, thoroughly captivating. [20 Sep 1991]
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    [The Real World] has been steadily evolving into the year's most riveting television, a compelling portrait of twentysomethings grappling with the 90's. ... Should "The Real World" be kept going much beyond these 13 episodes? I doubt it. There really isn't much happening.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    Its collection of carefully contrasted types and personalities promises to be the best yet. [22 Jun 1994]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    The plot of "House of Cards" requires more than just a couple suspensions of disbelief. Seemingly perceptive characters turn inexplicably naive. The obvious is overlooked just a bit too frequently. But, directed by Paul Seed, the production moves ahead briskly, and as the story turns more and more vicious, the timely potboiler becomes surprisingly compelling. Much of the credit belongs to Ian Richardson's scarily perfect performance as Francis Urquhart.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    It's by no means assured that American viewers will commit themselves to what is, in effect, a very long mini-series with no tidy wrap-ups each week. But Murder One sets the stage skillfully for what promises to be the television equivalent of an absorbing excursion into a good Mary Higgins Clark mystery. I wouldn't dream of missing, at the very least, the next few episodes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    Traditional Trekkies may object to the grit and occasional flippancy of the cheeky spinoff. The rest of us are likely to feel, at least for the time being, fairly optimistic about the future of "Deep Space 9." Mr. Brooks's performance alone is certainly encouraging. [7 Jan 1993]
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    Mr. Griffith effortlessly makes the most of the country sophisticate, and Dick Van Dyke is splendidly devious as the judge. Matlock makes easy viewing, so easy that you are liable to forget it's there.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    Mr. Romano has a knack for hilariously obsessing on life's most ordinary details. He's made for prime-time comedy, and "Everybody Loves Raymond" would seem to be his perfect vehicle. [13 Sep 1996]
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    The suspense is effectively maintained in this high-seas whodunit. [22 Sep 1995]
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    Issues of bias and prejudice are moved to center stage, rather heavyhandedly. There are references, direct and veiled, to blacks and civil-rights struggles, the Holocaust, and AIDS hysteria. But Gary Graham and Eric Pierpoint are effective as, respectively, a younger, hipper Matthew and a mellower George. For television, Fox's Alien Nation is different, adventurous and very much worth monitoring.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    Shaped by directors and camera people, given the familiar MTV gloss of breathless pacing and quick edits, "The Real World" is a relentlessly artificial concept. ... Accepting that, viewers can sit back and enjoy the carefully cultivated performances, keeping them in skeptical perspective.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    MacBride is the kind of intense, unpredictable, almost loopy kind of character that television audiences dote on. Think Bruce Willis in "Moonlighting."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    As in "Seinfeld" and the routines of countless stand-up comedians, nothing much happens in "Mad About You." ... At the very least, Mr. Reiser and Ms. Hunt get the chemistry just right.[23 Sep 1992]
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    Mr. Allen's sitcom may well work, although by the second episode it already shows uneasy signs of cuteness bloat. [17 Sep 1991]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    The show can get overly cute. It's hard to believe that anyone these days, even in remote Alaska, hasn't heard of a bagel, frozen or otherwise. And at one point, a passing reference is made to "St. Elsewhere." Not necessary. But, like Joel, a good many viewers may discover that the characters kind of grow on you. A first-rate cast makes it all the more easy. As Ed says to Joel about the gamey mooseburgers, you'll get used to it. [12 July 1990, p.C22]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    Except for an insistent music track, this initial portrait of the group is considerably less than sizzling. [28 Jun 1995]
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    Mr. Wahl has the kind of brooding good looks that could attract ratings - that is, if the public is ready for still another blood-and-guts romp on television.