Jonathan Rosenbaum

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For 1,529 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Beauty in Trouble
Lowest review score: 0 Showgirls
Score distribution:
1529 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The good direction and performances seem wasted on limited material; despite a few interesting twists and ambiguities, the main revelation--that the reporter is an insufferable snob--doesn't seem worth the 84 minutes devoted to spelling it out.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tries to be an audacious, irreverent satire about youth culture like "Lord Love a Duck," but most of the laughs get strangled at birth by the uncertainty of Siega's tone.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie is quite enjoyable as long as it explores the fantasy of a neglected little boy having an entire house of his own to explore and play in, but the physical cruelty that dominates the last act leaves a sour taste, and the multiple continuity errors strain one's suspension of disbelief to near the breaking point.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't question the legitimacy of celebrating the courage of these individuals and their families, and I can even tolerate the hokey nostalgia for World War II epics. But I'm troubled that the filmmakers have elided so much else of what happened on that day, as if it were some kind of neutral backdrop.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film has little to do with art, intelligence, or values (except for the kind found in department stores).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unlike many colleagues, I'm not a fan of "Amores Perros" or "21 Grams," scripted by Guillermo Arriaga and directed by Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritu. This conclusion to their trilogy is easier to follow as a narrative, but it's even more pretentious, generalizing about the state of the modern world.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like some of Joan Crawford's and Bette Davis's studio vehicles, this soapy romance exists only for what Gong Li can bring to it: a certain amount of soul and nuance.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even when his work is at its most contrived, which it certainly is here, writer-director Ron Shelton is the best purveyor of jock humor around.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For all its pretensions and avant-garde narrative dislocations, the star-studded cast...keeps this buzzing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    After a while it becomes apparent that this movie is too eager to please, too willing to sacrifice its point of view toward its targets to sustain itself for the length of a feature.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Leave it to coproducer Jerry Bruckheimer to revive the Indiana Jones cycle without the period setting, the camp elements, or Spielberg's efficiency; director Jon Turteltaub just plods along, and the script by Marianne and Cormac Wibberley is equally poker-faced.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Never all it was cracked up to be.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Has its awkward and square moments directorially, but it's also uncommonly honest and serious.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Somewhere in writer-director Giuseppe Tornatore's overstyled movie, about a 12-year-old boy (Sulfaro) during the Italian fascist period who has the hots for a mistreated war widow (Belluci), is a pretty good short story about the fickleness of community and the cruelty of gossip struggling to get out.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Part of the minimalist humor growing out of this small-scale event is that they can barely remember anything, because the revolution scarcely made any difference.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main compensation is Harrelson's well-judged and finely shaded performance; the secondary ones are the ladies he hangs out with -- Lauren Bacall, Lily Tomlin, and Kristin Scott Thomas. But the rest of this mainly drifts.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As beautifully mounted as this production is, Scorsese has a way of letting the decor take over, so that Wharton's tale of societal constraints comes through only in fits and starts. But it's a noble failure.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Val Kilmer, clearly pleased to be entering the Oscar disability sweepstakes, does what he can as the hunk who learns how to see.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An amiable, highly ingratiating piece of lowbrow entertainment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Well-made treacle.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This comedy drama is capably acted and undeniably touching in spots.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's reasonably well told and well mounted but little more.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Jeremy Piven and Annabella Sciorra exert some charm as bodyguards tracking the couple; Mark Harmon and Caroline Goodall are OK as the heroine's parents. Andy Cadiff directed Derek Guiley and David Schneiderman's by-the-numbers script.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Charmingly low-tech fantasy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    "B.S. I Love You" would be a more accurate title.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Lawrence Kasdan directed this fair-to-middling black comedy from a script by John Kostmayer, and although the pacing is sluggish in spots, people with a taste for acting as impersonation will enjoy some of the scenery chewing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This made-for-cable opus, halfway between documentary and docudrama, is willing to try anything and everything except for a consistent relationship to its material.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For the most part I was able to accept this thesis and enjoy Lopez in her usual superwoman role, but the script does get awfully preachy in spots.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This packaged tour through the great man's career is unenlightening and obfuscating, despite an adept lead performance by Robert Downey Jr.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The execution of the script is perfect, as always, but it's the laziest script Brooks has ever directed.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For most of this romantic comedy, fatuous contrivances run neck and neck with what seem to be authentic observations about repressed sibling rivalry; some of the latter are too painful to be funny, and eventually the contrivances win out, but the cast keeps it all watchable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The story ultimately lands in incoherence; but the cameos and local details, and even some of the gags, keep it perky.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Neither the crime nor its detection is especially interesting, and screenwriter Tony Gayton doesn't appear to be aiming for psychological insights.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Semiabsorbing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The problem is that happy endings this strident and overextended begin to seem somewhat desperate.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The Alabama setting is as phony as the one in Forrest Gump, and for all of Finney's effectiveness as a yarn-spinning geezer, his whoppers seem disconnected from his character and each other--a weakness Burton fails to resolve with an awkward Felliniesque finale.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The direction of Fran Rubel Kuzui (Tokyo Pop) suggests that she's more comfortable with character than action, and Joss Whedon's script has some fun with Valley talk (both genuine and ersatz) but strains to sell the story.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Few recent films have left me feeling more conflicted than Valeska Grisebach's second feature (2006), which is sensitive, moving, accomplished in its extraordinary direction of nonprofessional actors but also a little bogus.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The psychological and psychoanalytical probes into sexual and emotional problems keep this reasonably lively.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is an ideal straight-ahead version of Jesus's story, built around Christopher Plummer's offscreen narration, for people who don't already know all the details and can't follow all of "The Passion of the Christ" without a synopsis.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Limiting the potential overripeness of the material with tact and sincerity, he (Wang) generally makes the most of his resourceful cast; only the dog overacts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Munich may have value as an act of expiation but not as entertainment or art.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The limiting factor, despite serious performances by the two leads, is that neither character is entirely believable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Attractively animated.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It shows rare courage in protesting the widespread abuse of innocent Iraqis, but its pseudodocumentary form is full of awkward misfires (such as a protracted use of theme music from Barry Lyndon) and its acting is often terrible.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I could have done without all the pushy tactics of this romantic comedy.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though Adrian Lyne's clodhopper direction, underlined by a mushy Ennio Morricone score, predictably runs the gamut from soft-core porn in the manner of David Hamilton to hectoring close-ups, this is perhaps Lyne's best movie after Jacob's Ladder--a genuinely disturbing (if far from literary) adaptation of Nabokov's extraordinary novel, written by former journalist Stephen Schiff and starring, predictably, Jeremy Irons.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is a hokey, old-fashioned melodrama in which the actors scream more often than necessary.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The director's familiarity with silent cinema enhances the prudish pornographic footage, but when he starts cutting between separate perversions, I began to wonder if he was getting as bored with the material as I was.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I wouldn't have minded even the Hollywood schlock lurking behind the studied weirdness if I'd believed in any of the characters on any level.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from a few sleek shots involving boats or helicopters, the action eventually devolves into a standard war-movie shootout.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Some of it looks like a TV commercial, and the characters' motivations could have been generated by a computer, but the cast--Ray Barrett, Julia Blake, Simon Bossell, Saffron Burrows, Pippa Grandison, and Aden Young--is attractive and energetic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Smith is resourceful in the role, though the story stretches one's credulity about his character's resourcefulness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A pretty good caper comedy for 11-year-old boys -- "heist thriller" would make it sound too ambitious.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Cheung can't make the woman very interesting in her own right--the most compelling performance here is Nolte's.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    On the other hand, the brutality and sadism it delivers at every opportunity, which we're supposed to take for granted as part of the "fun," left me feeling that any civilization that can create such an entertainment may not deserve to survive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I'm too big a fan of director James Whale (1896-1957) to take a film about him lightly, and I'm afraid this speculative 1998 movie about his last days won't do.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's silly adolescent stuff, but director Brett Ratner and screenwriters Paul Zbyszewski and Craig Rosenberg serve it up gracefully.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Story is fairly conventional and not especially well told, though as usual Tran's images are so sensual and beautiful that I was rarely bored or frustrated.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The young heroine is rather humorless, but Gavras's intelligence and skillful touch are evident throughout.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Watchable but not very illuminating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The three actors manage to get a lot of mileage out of the material: although one never quite believes that Tandy's character is Jewish, she is remarkable in every other respect, and Freeman and Aykroyd are wonderful throughout.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is compelling to the extent that the subject is, but also unimaginative and unsurprising.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In some ways, for better and for worse, this is even more about Graysmith (Jake Gyllehaal)--who became obsessed with solving the Zodiac killings that terrorized northern California in the late 60s--than about the murderer.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Watchable if relatively threadbare movie.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While the results are far from unprofessional--the cast is uniformly good, including a characteristically slapped-around Meryl Streep...The male self-pity is so overwhelming that you'll probably stagger out of this mumbling something about Tolstoy (as many critics did when the film first came out in 1978) if you aren't as nauseated as I was.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The only one who seems to be having much fun is Parker Posey, camping it up as one of the vampires.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It runs out of energy before the end.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I didn't feel I was wasting my time but I started looking at my watch long before it was over.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A multifaceted misfire from writer-director Steven Zaillian.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's plenty of disquieting material here, but I wish the film were less antagonistic in its own right.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was never bored but only occasionally interested.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    About as entertaining as a no-brainer can be--a lot more fun, for my money, than a cornball theme-park ride like "Speed," and every bit as fast moving. But don't expect much of an aftertaste.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pistol-packing De Jesus evokes Pam Grier in spots but certainly holds her own.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Has some of the ring of truth, even though the movie lingers far too long over its own epiphanies.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tries way too hard to be clever and shrewd.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's a letdown from the man who brought us "Men in Black" and "Addams Family Values."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A brave effort to stare down the specter of American failure, it gets off on the wrong foot by pretentiously turning the doomed hero into a Christ figure--a traffic cop with arms extended in crucifixion mode--before the story even gets started.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I enjoyed this while it lasted, especially for the cast.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It doesn't have the polish or the momentum of an Indiana Jones adventure, and isn't too engaging on the plot level, but at least the filmmakers keep it moving with lots of screwball stunts.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The results are too pretty and well acted to be a total washout, but the fascination with evil and power that gives the novel intensity is virtually absent; what remains is mainly petty malice and mild cynicism.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is one of those slick, violent, ridiculous Hollywood jobs that make little sense as a story, a comment on life, or a depiction of characters, but are moderately enjoyable in their spinning of movie conventions. There's even a good De Palma-style fake shock ending.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I have no objection to soap opera when it's delivered with conviction and a sense of urgency, but this sappy tale ... held my interest only moderately.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A good concert film might have been culled from Vaughn's 30-date LA-to-Chicago tour in September 2005, which showcased stand-up comedians Ahmed Ahmed, John Caparulo, Bret Ernst, and Sebastian Maniscalco and included bits with Vaughn, Jon Favreau, Dwight Yoakam, Justin Long, and Keir O'Donnell. But this is more like a DVD extra for that film.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    G
    Seems like a dopey idea to me, but if you aren't familiar with the Fitzgerald novel, you may enjoy this; at least Jones and his costars play the story as if they believed in it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is simply efficient, routine storytelling with a high gloss but an undernourished sense of character.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The only thing that keeps the proceedings bearable is the cast gamely rolling with all the shameless sitcom punches the script keeps throwing at them.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Starts off with a lot of promise and excitement but winds up 165 minutes later feeling empty and affectless.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The silliness only slows down for a few hokey romantic interludes. But if you like to see stuff crash or blow up, this is your movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The set decor is more intricate than any of the characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Most features composed of sketches by different filmmakers are wildly uneven. This one is consistently mediocre or slightly better, albeit pleasant and watchable. It helps that none of the episodes runs longer than five or six minutes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Standard-issue liberal feel-good fodder.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The whole thing's pretty cute and breezy, but don't expect logic or coherence.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Directors Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe (Lost in La Mancha) are too preoccupied with hip cleverness to have much else on their minds, and the music is so-so.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Marsh and cowriter Milo Addica (Monster's Ball) strive for gothic tragedy as they unbuckle the Bible Belt, but despite some credible performances (Hurt is especially interesting) the effort feels willful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Marion Cotillard tears up all the available scenery in this overblown, achronological biopic of French pop singer Edith Piaf.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A few laughs and a lot of hyperbolic shtick make this a little better than formulaic before the standard-issue resolution.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This intermittently effective UK horror thriller carefully establishes the psychological relationships among the women, then squanders this calibrated and generally plausible setup with a series of crude, implausible, and scattershot horror effects.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is watchable as well as informative...But I wish I had a better notion of what story he's trying to tell.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Alan Rudolph's 1994 feature about writer Dorothy Parker and the famous Algonquin wits she hung out with in the 20s certainly has its pleasures, but someone should tell Rudolph that, for all his skill and charm, period movies aren't really his forte.

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