Jonathan Rosenbaum

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For 1,493 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Full Metal Jacket
Lowest review score: 0 The Long Kiss Goodnight
Score distribution:
1493 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Rather wan in its anything-goes spirit of invention, the movie has a surprisingly low number of laughs; some of the initial premises are good, but there's very little energy in the follow-through, and this time Murray's listlessness seems more anemic than comic.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The special effects, for once, are witty rather than overblown, and director Nora Ephron, writing with her sister Delia, handles the material with some grace and confidence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Watchable, if at times familiar.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    By the end Smilla has become a formulaic action hero--equally at home in an evening dress and blue jeans--not a marginalized victim seeking to uncover the source of her wound, and the film collapses around her like glaciers of melting ice.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The performances, especially of Penn and Robbins, are so powerful and detailed (down to the Boston accents) that they often persuade one to overlook the narrative contrivances (particularly the incessant crosscutting), the arty trimmings (including Eastwood's own score), and the dubious social philosophy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A talking bulldog named Frank steals the show.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was bored well before the end, but found the first half hour pretty funny.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Grim, phantasmagoric view of recent and not-so-recent Russian history.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Another giggly gross-out comedy for teenagers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This sounds like a slender premise on which to hang a feature, but director Ning Hao is more interested in ethnography and landscapes than narrative and often holds our interest by concentrating on how folklore, technology--motorbikes, cars, trucks, films, TV--and imagination affect a nomadic way of life.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's ultimately a losing battle when the audience's lack of interest in eastern Europeans is assumed at the outset.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What's most conspicuously missing is the kind of background information needed to assess many of Eichmann's statements.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This moves back and forth between slightly clever and dopey or silly, kept vaguely watchable by the charming leads.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It has been called both detached and loaded, unfairly slanted as well as balanced by some of its critics--I can only testify that I found the film both troubling and absorbing over two separate viewings.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Carell and Apatow collaborated on the script; it does manage a few laughs, but the characters seldom progress beyond the two-dimensional.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    John Zorn wrote the percussive score, which is compelling throughout.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The facts of their grim treatment, often exacerbated by their estrangement from their countries of origin, sometimes recall the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is all but crushed by Tom Cruise's screen-hogging demand that everything collapse and swoon around him. If the star gave us more of a rest, we might have more of a movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ray
    Differs from other authorized Hollywood musical biopics in one striking detail: its subject, still alive when most of this was made, is almost never shown as a likable person.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The punchy, nonstop visual effects (including an animation segment and stylized subtitles that sometimes suggest an online chat) crowd out coherent storytelling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Newly updated but shamelessly hokey, Steven Spielberg's version of the 1898 H.G. Wells yarn about murderous invaders from outer space starts off as a nimble scare show like "Jaws."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The modeling of human figures and the sense of depth are both impressive; the characters themselves are mainly idiotic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sometimes it's hard to tell what's mere overreaching and what's nostalgia for Hollywood's former grandiloquence.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    With its flashy, pretentious visual effects, this is really a 98-minute dream sequence--though it's worth recalling that the most effective dream sequences tend to be only a few minutes long.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Given the talent on board, there's an undeniable flair and effectiveness in certain scenes (such as Pacino dancing the tango with a stranger in a posh restaurant), but the meretricious calculation finally sticks in one's throat.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Jay Craven's stilted adaptation of a novel by Howard Frank Mosher lacks the urgency, the poetry, or the feeling for period that might have brought the material to life, while the cast seems to be largely squandered.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even though it's scripted by a woman (Kelly Masterson), this tale of buried family resentments rising to the surface as the brothers plot to rob their parents' jewelry store is concerned only with the guys, and it's marred by an uncharacteristically mannered performance by Albert Finney as the father.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The whole thing's so worthy that I wish I liked it more. It makes time pass agreeably, but Square John still seems about as innocent of fresh ideas (aesthetically and otherwise) as most of his characters, and for this kind of leftist multiplot I found his "City of Hope" more engaging.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A lot of superwimp gags executed by Luke Wilson grow out of this premise, as do some tacky 50s-style special effects. The movie's too slapdash to keep its characters consistent, but this has its moments.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though the basic brains-versus-beauty tension suggests a female variation on "The Nutty Professor", this is a softer version of the dilemma than Jerry Lewis offers -- easier to take and easier to forget.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like many sequels this is actually a remake, and it suffers from the law of diminishing returns.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Both actors work hard to give this disturbing crime story some flavor and substance, but the narrative is overextended and poorly organized.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Tom Tykwer (Run Lola Run) and cowriters Andrew Birkin and Bernd Eichinger preserve some of the novel's storytelling flair, and Dustin Hoffman does a swell turn as the antihero's Italian mentor. But despite a fairly spectacular climax, the material's generic limitations eventually catch up with the plot.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Writer-director Robert Shallcross believes in it so passionately that he came close to convincing me too.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film never strays much beyond the obvious, despite a conscientious effort by Tim Robbins to humanize a white security officer.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ryan's abrasive and rather creepy character is something of a departure for her.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Under the circumstances, MacLaine, Costner, and Ruffalo acquit themselves well.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If not all the gags work, the overall irreverence and all-American anomie are fairly contagious.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Peter Hyams, a pretty good cinematographer but a mediocre director, goes to work on a script by Andrew W. Marlowe that's designed to carry us from one bit of hyperbole to the next.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One can certainly be amused and entertained by writer-director Michael Davis's hyperbolic action frolics--I was--but not without feeling pretty low and stupid.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I've heard it said that Philip Seymour Hoffman, one of the most talented character actors currently working, can't carry a film himself, and unfortunately this indie feature isn't meaty enough to prove otherwise.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    So lackluster both as an homage and as a story in its own right that I was already forgetting it before it was over.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The only other adaptations I've seen of the Alexandre Dumas novel (which I haven't read) are the Classics Illustrated comic book and the 1939 James Whale potboiler, both of which I prefer to this vulgar and overwrought 1998 free-for-all, which makes you wait interminably for the story's central narrative premise.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The whole thing feels throwaway, but some of the gags are funny.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Christophe Honoré collaborated with Anne-Sophie Birot on the script of her excellent "Girls Can't Swim," but left to his own devices, he seems like a relatively dull cousin of Arnaud Desplechin (My Sex Life . . . or How I Got Into an Argument).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Allen gets a chance to unload all his usual patronizing contempt for and middle-class "wisdom" about his own working-class origins.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie has plenty to engage one's interest but little to sustain it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from the grim forebodings of tragedy, writer-director Nick Cassavetes seems to have modeled this ambitious docudrama on Larry Clark's kiddie-porn shockers, but he doesn't know what to leave out, and the movie becomes excessively complicated with ancillary agendas.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unbelievably pretentious and a bit of a hoot but rarely boring.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This video profile by Deb Ellis and Denis Mueller allows his significance to register and his charisma to shine despite a pedestrian approach that's especially awkward in its use of archival footage.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite a brisk opening and some agreeable (if sloppy) choreography at the very end, I was less than tickled by the premise of David Serrano's script, that the characters lie to and betray one another as naturally as they breathe.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's not much humor to keep it all life-size, and by the final stretch it's become bloated, mechanical, and tiresome.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The pseudomystical vagueness that seems to be Spielberg's stock-in-trade stifles most of the particularity of the source.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Gardos -- treats it competently, though without much freshness or imagination.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Garcia seems to be aping the "Godfather" movies and Warren Beatty's "Reds," but the movie's gracefulness is limited to its handling of the music (some of which Garcia wrote).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The SF hardware (enjoyable) and thriller mechanics (mechanical) of this Jerry Bruckheimer slam-banger don't mesh very well with reflection, and the action trumps most evidence of thought.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Whereas "Posession" was relatively light on its feet, this is so overloaded from the outset that it can only sink.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's fun, instructive, and stimulating, but never beautiful. Ultimately it's limited by its compulsion to knock our socks off at every turn and to compare itself with "Alice in Wonderland."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite a certain originality, the movie isn't really a success, not only because the plot bites off more than it can chew (the film doesn't conclude; it simply stops), but also because, like its hero, it has some trouble distinguishing between petty irritations and cataclysmic traumas.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main activity charted in the documentary is a kind of adolescent mischief, as Dick and a private investigator seek to uncover and expose the anonymous MPAA employees.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The Coens' lack of interest in Mississippi is fortunately joined by a healthy appreciation of gospel music, while their smirking appreciation of stupidity extends to every character in the movie while including no one in the audience.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Silly but fairly harmless.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Billy Kent seems to have instructed most of his actors to behave like robotic sitcom characters; the principal exception is Danny DeVito, who simply behaves like Danny DeVito.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This goofball comedy is easy to take and just as easy to leave alone--unless you develop an affection for the hapless characters, which isn't too hard to do.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A sensationalist grunge festival spiked with dollops of poetry on the sound track.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though the premise seems obvious and facile, the execution and the delineation of the various characters (all recognizable Hollywood types) are likable and funny, and the cast is great.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's neither sexy enough to qualify as good trash nor serious enough to pass for history.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ultimately just another Dirty Harry opus.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Purports to give us the lowdown on Manhattan celebrity life, yet it depends so consistently on plot contrivances and other movies (The King of Comedy, Midnight Cowboy, even All About Eve) that it often comes across as wannabe muckraking.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was worn down by the excess: Depp's fruity impersonation of Keith Richards (or William F. Buckley) as pirate Jack Sparrow; too many bottomless chasms on an island with too many jungle savages (after the fashion of Peter Jackson's King Kong); Bill Nighy playing too squishy a villain with a beard of too many crawling octopus tentacles; too much violence, pop nihilism, and sick humor.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At its best it's a free-form fantasy with glitzy, well-executed effects and assorted metaphysical conceits but little feeling for any of the characters apart from derision (with a few touches of racism here and there).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The story has its hokey moments ("There's something very fishy about that girl"), but the sincerity and focus of the storytelling compensate.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A superior soap opera, evocative at times of Warren Beatty's "Reds."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is mainly smoke, not fire.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nothing that suggests an independent vision, unless you count seeing more limbs blown off than usual.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Eastwood himself, pushing 70 but cruising women in their early 20s, counts on more goodwill than I can muster. I wasn't bored, but my suspension of disbelief collapsed well before the end.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's no masterpiece, but I found it consistently good-hearted and sometimes hilarious, and the sparse crowd I saw it with was laughing as much as I was, especially at the outrageous rap numbers.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Once the gore and suspense take over, this becomes mechanical and unpleasant.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The setup of this comedy by director-cowriter Peter Hedges (Pieces of April) and some subsequent twists may be contrived, and the laughs aren't very plentiful, but much of the behavior seems real, and the able cast makes the most of it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What emerges is a very poor man's North by Northwest without much moral nuance and a decreasing number of thrills.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Well crafted and mindless in the best Hollywood tradition.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ordinarily I don't care for this kind of thing at all, but something must be said for Jackson's endless reserves of giddy energy; perhaps because this is so clearly meant to be silly, he generally avoids the calculated mean-spiritedness of more prestigious directors like Spielberg and Renny Harlin.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The passionate and carnivalesque sense of politics reminded me at times of "Dog Day Afternoon," but despite the absence of cynicism this is a 90s story in every sense of the word
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    2005 French feature by the highly uneven Francois Ozon (Swimming Pool, Under the Sand), who doesn't have much to say about his subject that's fresh.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sweet tempered but occasionally simplistic youth picture about three young, progressive Israelis who share a flat in a chic section of Tel Aviv.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This movie is a clone itself, a far cry from "Total Recall" but vastly superior to "End of Days."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Easy to take but ultimately rather aimless.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Originally a two-part film running about three hours, this treacle has been reduced by almost a third, though it still seems to run on forever -- a bit like life but much less interesting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's some striking camerawork by Christopher Doyle (in 35-millimeter) and Rain Kathy Li (in Super-8), though this doesn't alter the overall feeling of random, nihilistic drift.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    You may find it pleasantly diverting, especially if you like the leads, but mostly it made me want to see "Adam's Rib" again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you don't care about the first version, or what director Jonathan Demme's name once meant, the cast does an OK job with Daniel Pyne and Dean Georgaris's routine thriller script.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Those who miss the wildness of his premainstream work will probably be only partially appeased.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The performances are perfectly distilled, but the traits I dislike in Bergman are all here -- self-pity, brutality, spiritual constipation, and an unwillingness to try to overcome these difficulties.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film adopts, somewhat insidiously, the myth that life was simpler back in 1953 and '54, and it offers Murrow as a lesson for today.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Malick still has an eye for landscapes, but since "Badlands" (1973) his storytelling skill has atrophied, and he's now given to transcendental reveries, discontinuous editing, offscreen monologues, and a pie-eyed sense of awe. All these things can be defended, even celebrated, but I couldn't find my bearings.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sadly, the technical logistics seem to have impeded the dreamlike flow a movie like this requires.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The good direction and performances seem wasted on limited material; despite a few interesting twists and ambiguities, the main revelation--that the reporter is an insufferable snob--doesn't seem worth the 84 minutes devoted to spelling it out.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tries to be an audacious, irreverent satire about youth culture like "Lord Love a Duck," but most of the laughs get strangled at birth by the uncertainty of Siega's tone.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie is quite enjoyable as long as it explores the fantasy of a neglected little boy having an entire house of his own to explore and play in, but the physical cruelty that dominates the last act leaves a sour taste, and the multiple continuity errors strain one's suspension of disbelief to near the breaking point.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't question the legitimacy of celebrating the courage of these individuals and their families, and I can even tolerate the hokey nostalgia for World War II epics. But I'm troubled that the filmmakers have elided so much else of what happened on that day, as if it were some kind of neutral backdrop.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film has little to do with art, intelligence, or values (except for the kind found in department stores).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unlike many colleagues, I'm not a fan of "Amores Perros" or "21 Grams," scripted by Guillermo Arriaga and directed by Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritu. This conclusion to their trilogy is easier to follow as a narrative, but it's even more pretentious, generalizing about the state of the modern world.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like some of Joan Crawford's and Bette Davis's studio vehicles, this soapy romance exists only for what Gong Li can bring to it: a certain amount of soul and nuance.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even when his work is at its most contrived, which it certainly is here, writer-director Ron Shelton is the best purveyor of jock humor around.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For all its pretensions and avant-garde narrative dislocations, the star-studded cast...keeps this buzzing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    After a while it becomes apparent that this movie is too eager to please, too willing to sacrifice its point of view toward its targets to sustain itself for the length of a feature.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Leave it to coproducer Jerry Bruckheimer to revive the Indiana Jones cycle without the period setting, the camp elements, or Spielberg's efficiency; director Jon Turteltaub just plods along, and the script by Marianne and Cormac Wibberley is equally poker-faced.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Never all it was cracked up to be.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Has its awkward and square moments directorially, but it's also uncommonly honest and serious.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Somewhere in writer-director Giuseppe Tornatore's overstyled movie, about a 12-year-old boy (Sulfaro) during the Italian fascist period who has the hots for a mistreated war widow (Belluci), is a pretty good short story about the fickleness of community and the cruelty of gossip struggling to get out.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Part of the minimalist humor growing out of this small-scale event is that they can barely remember anything, because the revolution scarcely made any difference.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main compensation is Harrelson's well-judged and finely shaded performance; the secondary ones are the ladies he hangs out with -- Lauren Bacall, Lily Tomlin, and Kristin Scott Thomas. But the rest of this mainly drifts.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As beautifully mounted as this production is, Scorsese has a way of letting the decor take over, so that Wharton's tale of societal constraints comes through only in fits and starts. But it's a noble failure.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Val Kilmer, clearly pleased to be entering the Oscar disability sweepstakes, does what he can as the hunk who learns how to see.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An amiable, highly ingratiating piece of lowbrow entertainment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Well-made treacle.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This comedy drama is capably acted and undeniably touching in spots.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's reasonably well told and well mounted but little more.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Jeremy Piven and Annabella Sciorra exert some charm as bodyguards tracking the couple; Mark Harmon and Caroline Goodall are OK as the heroine's parents. Andy Cadiff directed Derek Guiley and David Schneiderman's by-the-numbers script.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Charmingly low-tech fantasy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    "B.S. I Love You" would be a more accurate title.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Lawrence Kasdan directed this fair-to-middling black comedy from a script by John Kostmayer, and although the pacing is sluggish in spots, people with a taste for acting as impersonation will enjoy some of the scenery chewing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This made-for-cable opus, halfway between documentary and docudrama, is willing to try anything and everything except for a consistent relationship to its material.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For the most part I was able to accept this thesis and enjoy Lopez in her usual superwoman role, but the script does get awfully preachy in spots.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The execution of the script is perfect, as always, but it's the laziest script Brooks has ever directed.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For most of this romantic comedy, fatuous contrivances run neck and neck with what seem to be authentic observations about repressed sibling rivalry; some of the latter are too painful to be funny, and eventually the contrivances win out, but the cast keeps it all watchable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The story ultimately lands in incoherence; but the cameos and local details, and even some of the gags, keep it perky.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Neither the crime nor its detection is especially interesting, and screenwriter Tony Gayton doesn't appear to be aiming for psychological insights.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Semiabsorbing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The problem is that happy endings this strident and overextended begin to seem somewhat desperate.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The Alabama setting is as phony as the one in Forrest Gump, and for all of Finney's effectiveness as a yarn-spinning geezer, his whoppers seem disconnected from his character and each other--a weakness Burton fails to resolve with an awkward Felliniesque finale.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The direction of Fran Rubel Kuzui (Tokyo Pop) suggests that she's more comfortable with character than action, and Joss Whedon's script has some fun with Valley talk (both genuine and ersatz) but strains to sell the story.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Few recent films have left me feeling more conflicted than Valeska Grisebach's second feature (2006), which is sensitive, moving, accomplished in its extraordinary direction of nonprofessional actors but also a little bogus.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The psychological and psychoanalytical probes into sexual and emotional problems keep this reasonably lively.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is an ideal straight-ahead version of Jesus's story, built around Christopher Plummer's offscreen narration, for people who don't already know all the details and can't follow all of "The Passion of the Christ" without a synopsis.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Limiting the potential overripeness of the material with tact and sincerity, he (Wang) generally makes the most of his resourceful cast; only the dog overacts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Munich may have value as an act of expiation but not as entertainment or art.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The limiting factor, despite serious performances by the two leads, is that neither character is entirely believable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Attractively animated.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It shows rare courage in protesting the widespread abuse of innocent Iraqis, but its pseudodocumentary form is full of awkward misfires (such as a protracted use of theme music from Barry Lyndon) and its acting is often terrible.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I could have done without all the pushy tactics of this romantic comedy.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though Adrian Lyne's clodhopper direction, underlined by a mushy Ennio Morricone score, predictably runs the gamut from soft-core porn in the manner of David Hamilton to hectoring close-ups, this is perhaps Lyne's best movie after Jacob's Ladder--a genuinely disturbing (if far from literary) adaptation of Nabokov's extraordinary novel, written by former journalist Stephen Schiff and starring, predictably, Jeremy Irons.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is a hokey, old-fashioned melodrama in which the actors scream more often than necessary.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The director's familiarity with silent cinema enhances the prudish pornographic footage, but when he starts cutting between separate perversions, I began to wonder if he was getting as bored with the material as I was.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I wouldn't have minded even the Hollywood schlock lurking behind the studied weirdness if I'd believed in any of the characters on any level.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from a few sleek shots involving boats or helicopters, the action eventually devolves into a standard war-movie shootout.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Some of it looks like a TV commercial, and the characters' motivations could have been generated by a computer, but the cast--Ray Barrett, Julia Blake, Simon Bossell, Saffron Burrows, Pippa Grandison, and Aden Young--is attractive and energetic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Smith is resourceful in the role, though the story stretches one's credulity about his character's resourcefulness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A pretty good caper comedy for 11-year-old boys -- "heist thriller" would make it sound too ambitious.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Cheung can't make the woman very interesting in her own right--the most compelling performance here is Nolte's.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    On the other hand, the brutality and sadism it delivers at every opportunity, which we're supposed to take for granted as part of the "fun," left me feeling that any civilization that can create such an entertainment may not deserve to survive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I'm too big a fan of director James Whale (1896-1957) to take a film about him lightly, and I'm afraid this speculative 1998 movie about his last days won't do.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's silly adolescent stuff, but director Brett Ratner and screenwriters Paul Zbyszewski and Craig Rosenberg serve it up gracefully.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Story is fairly conventional and not especially well told, though as usual Tran's images are so sensual and beautiful that I was rarely bored or frustrated.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The young heroine is rather humorless, but Gavras's intelligence and skillful touch are evident throughout.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Watchable but not very illuminating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The three actors manage to get a lot of mileage out of the material: although one never quite believes that Tandy's character is Jewish, she is remarkable in every other respect, and Freeman and Aykroyd are wonderful throughout.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is compelling to the extent that the subject is, but also unimaginative and unsurprising.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In some ways, for better and for worse, this is even more about Graysmith (Jake Gyllehaal)--who became obsessed with solving the Zodiac killings that terrorized northern California in the late 60s--than about the murderer.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Watchable if relatively threadbare movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While the results are far from unprofessional--the cast is uniformly good, including a characteristically slapped-around Meryl Streep...The male self-pity is so overwhelming that you'll probably stagger out of this mumbling something about Tolstoy (as many critics did when the film first came out in 1978) if you aren't as nauseated as I was.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The only one who seems to be having much fun is Parker Posey, camping it up as one of the vampires.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It runs out of energy before the end.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I didn't feel I was wasting my time but I started looking at my watch long before it was over.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A multifaceted misfire from writer-director Steven Zaillian.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's plenty of disquieting material here, but I wish the film were less antagonistic in its own right.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was never bored but only occasionally interested.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    About as entertaining as a no-brainer can be--a lot more fun, for my money, than a cornball theme-park ride like "Speed," and every bit as fast moving. But don't expect much of an aftertaste.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pistol-packing De Jesus evokes Pam Grier in spots but certainly holds her own.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Has some of the ring of truth, even though the movie lingers far too long over its own epiphanies.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tries way too hard to be clever and shrewd.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's a letdown from the man who brought us "Men in Black" and "Addams Family Values."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A brave effort to stare down the specter of American failure, it gets off on the wrong foot by pretentiously turning the doomed hero into a Christ figure--a traffic cop with arms extended in crucifixion mode--before the story even gets started.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I enjoyed this while it lasted, especially for the cast.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It doesn't have the polish or the momentum of an Indiana Jones adventure, and isn't too engaging on the plot level, but at least the filmmakers keep it moving with lots of screwball stunts.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The results are too pretty and well acted to be a total washout, but the fascination with evil and power that gives the novel intensity is virtually absent; what remains is mainly petty malice and mild cynicism.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is one of those slick, violent, ridiculous Hollywood jobs that make little sense as a story, a comment on life, or a depiction of characters, but are moderately enjoyable in their spinning of movie conventions. There's even a good De Palma-style fake shock ending.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I have no objection to soap opera when it's delivered with conviction and a sense of urgency, but this sappy tale ... held my interest only moderately.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A good concert film might have been culled from Vaughn's 30-date LA-to-Chicago tour in September 2005, which showcased stand-up comedians Ahmed Ahmed, John Caparulo, Bret Ernst, and Sebastian Maniscalco and included bits with Vaughn, Jon Favreau, Dwight Yoakam, Justin Long, and Keir O'Donnell. But this is more like a DVD extra for that film.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    G
    Seems like a dopey idea to me, but if you aren't familiar with the Fitzgerald novel, you may enjoy this; at least Jones and his costars play the story as if they believed in it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is simply efficient, routine storytelling with a high gloss but an undernourished sense of character.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The only thing that keeps the proceedings bearable is the cast gamely rolling with all the shameless sitcom punches the script keeps throwing at them.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Starts off with a lot of promise and excitement but winds up 165 minutes later feeling empty and affectless.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The silliness only slows down for a few hokey romantic interludes. But if you like to see stuff crash or blow up, this is your movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The set decor is more intricate than any of the characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Most features composed of sketches by different filmmakers are wildly uneven. This one is consistently mediocre or slightly better, albeit pleasant and watchable. It helps that none of the episodes runs longer than five or six minutes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Standard-issue liberal feel-good fodder.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The whole thing's pretty cute and breezy, but don't expect logic or coherence.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Directors Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe (Lost in La Mancha) are too preoccupied with hip cleverness to have much else on their minds, and the music is so-so.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Marsh and cowriter Milo Addica (Monster's Ball) strive for gothic tragedy as they unbuckle the Bible Belt, but despite some credible performances (Hurt is especially interesting) the effort feels willful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Marion Cotillard tears up all the available scenery in this overblown, achronological biopic of French pop singer Edith Piaf.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A few laughs and a lot of hyperbolic shtick make this a little better than formulaic before the standard-issue resolution.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This intermittently effective UK horror thriller carefully establishes the psychological relationships among the women, then squanders this calibrated and generally plausible setup with a series of crude, implausible, and scattershot horror effects.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is watchable as well as informative...But I wish I had a better notion of what story he's trying to tell.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Alan Rudolph's 1994 feature about writer Dorothy Parker and the famous Algonquin wits she hung out with in the 20s certainly has its pleasures, but someone should tell Rudolph that, for all his skill and charm, period movies aren't really his forte.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The involved backstory and Hartley's own generic music both prove burdensome; the main attraction is the cast's amusing way of handling Hartley's mannerist dialogue and conceits.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This exercise in mainstream masochism, macho posturing, and designer-grunge fascism is borderline ridiculous. But it also happens to be David Fincher's richest movie.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're looking for a simple-minded farce with campy overtones, this 2008 feature might be your dish.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I suspect an account of all the complex business transactions would be more fun than anything in the movie, where you can't see a blue sky that isn't made up to resemble the Dreamworks logo.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Predictably adolescent and smarmy, with the mix of sentimentality and cynical flippancy that's becoming Steven Soderbergh's specialty (even when he's pretending to make art films), this is chewing gum for the eyes and ears, and not bad as such.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite the title, this is less a soccer documentary than a corporate hagiography along the lines of "The Last Mogul" or "The Kid Stays in the Picture"; its real hero isn't Cosmos star Pele (who wisely declined to be interviewed), but Steve Ross, CEO of Warner Communications, which owned the team.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For me, part of the fun of Snake Eyes is the genuine satisfaction of seeing Brian De Palma finally arriving at his own level.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite some sentimentality and occasional directorial missteps, this is a respectable piece of work--evocative, very funny in spots, and obviously keenly felt. With Francis Capra, Taral Hicks, and Katherine Narducci.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Documentary filmmaker Chuck Workman has a slick and entertaining way of stitching together old footage and practically no analytical or historical insight at all.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The couple's parents have a bit more personality than the other characters, but on the whole this is strictly by the numbers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Each set piece is effectively executed, but the characters and their motivations become progressively dimmer and more confused.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Whimsical fantasy tends to work best when its premise is used sparingly, but in this case the fantasy element takes over the story, becoming mechanical and often confused.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The characters are instantly reversible--the bratty kid turns out to be a sweetie pie, the mother just needs to be told off. Only Giamatti, as the cliched businessman husband, is irredeemable.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though director Ulu Grosbard is as good as he usually is with most of the actors, the story problems tend to stump him too.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Dumont is much more confident when he sticks to the title town and the young woman the men left behind; his habit of alternating close shots with extreme long shots and his singularly unsentimental way of showing sex are as distinctive as ever.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An unholy mess that becomes steadily more incoherent -- morally, dramatically, and conceptually.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The sheer oddness of the New York world constructed for this film--where cops and crooks are literally interchangeable, and Oldman and Danny Aiello are stranded in roles that pick over the leavings of earlier parts--ultimately seems at once too deranged and too mechanical.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While the filmmakers manage to keep things interesting (sexy, kinky, and ambiguous) much of the time, the self-conscious piety that Frears lavishes on this material places it in an uncertain netherworld that prevents it from ever becoming fully convincing, even as a stylistic exercise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Infamous has dramaturgical strengths, whether or not it gets the facts right. Jones's performance as Capote tends to be delivered in a monotone, yet thanks to Craig all of their scenes together are potently realized.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Death of a President wants to function as a mindless thriller that eventually makes us think -- and only after the film is over question the form that encouraged us to be mindless. These are incompatible agendas, and in the end neither is fully successful.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Doesn't reflect anyone's love or hatred for anything, just a lot of anxiety about test marketing, which means it takes a nosedive when it goes shopping for an ending.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    By the time [James Ivory and Ruth Prawer Jhabvala] get around to articulating a story, the inhibitions imposed by their "good taste" begin to seem more like gutlessness, and what initially promises to be an exposure of American liberal doublethink about slavery winds up as a querulous wimp out on a subject that the underrated "Mandingo" is better equipped to deal with.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Murphy takes on a softer edge than usual this time: the plot recalls a Jeanette MacDonald operetta of the Depression, the mythical African country looks like a Beverly Hills fever dream, and, true to Murphy's idealized black middle-class view of things, everybody gets what he wants without much fuss or sacrifice, and virtually the only poor people in evidence are white.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Kevin Jordan (Smiling Fish and Goat on Fire), a protege of Martin Scorsese, wrote and directed this dull 2005 autobiographical feature; it feels real, but solid performances fail to enliven the characters.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For my money, what keeps it bearable is mainly the mugging of the older folks -- not just Jack Black, who steals the show in a part seemingly inspired by John Belushi, but Catherine O'Hara, John Lithgow, and cameos by Chevy Chase, Lily Tomlin, and Kevin Kline.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    More witty than laugh-out-loud funny.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not very believable, even in relation to its own premises, but if you were charmed by "Somewhere in Time" and/or Jack Finney's novel "Time and Again," this might charm you as well.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I'm not sure how much has been gained in the updating.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's ultimately hamstrung by storytelling that seems both underdeveloped and overdetermined.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This sprawling and ambitious three-part Canadian film traces the spread of AIDS on three continents, but it gets off to a confusing start… By the time the movie returned to Africa, it had lost me despite its talented cast and its noble intentions.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It did give me plenty of jolts and surprises.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The Spielbergian attempt at sweetness--heralded by references in Danny Elfman's score to the Nutcracker Suite--never fully convinces.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Hampered by the kind of overacting that the cast seems to enjoy more than the audience.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This highly uneven comedy by writer-director Adam Brooks might be easier to take if it were less infatuated with its own cuteness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An irrefutable triumph of engineering, and it entertained and intrigued me through two separate viewings...though as a view of the human condition it's astonishingly and depressingly meager.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie does have a certain amount of star power and occasional bursts of inventive mise en scene, which do a good job of diverting us so we don't realize that not much else is going on.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ridiculous but occasionally fun.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A Disney musical with an undistinguished score (Alan Menken and Jack Feldman), fair to middling choreography (Kenny Ortega and Peggy Holmes), and clunky direction (Ortega) that still manages to be entertaining in spots because of its story.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pretty enjoyable as a piece of campy sleaze--especially for the first half hour, before the storytelling starts to dawdle.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite (or maybe because of) his obligatory nods to Hitchcock, this is slick and entertaining enough to work quite effectively as thriller porn, even with two contradictory denouements to its mystery (take your pick--or rather, your ice pick).
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie does a pretty good job with period ambience. But it's a long haul waiting for the hero to keel over.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This film sounds better than it plays; there are too many echoes of "Alphaville" and of the dreamy drift of "Blade Runner." But the style of the opening and closing credits is pretty spiffy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brewer knows how to guide his leads through this improbable story, and he kept me interested in spite of everything.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A watchable but not very memorable comedy-drama.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not a movie that needs to exist, but it passes the time, and at least Hopkins manages to look like Picasso at odd moments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Hurt's character is so inert and unemotional that some spectators may find it difficult to stay interested in him.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Slight but savory.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Originality and even a certain amount of obscurity are more appealing than formula. This doesn't work, but I was never bored.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Reminded me most of Jean Genet's "Un chant d'amour," with bondage and latex replacing incarceration and cigarettes. This is not to say that it's equally good or poetic, but the eroticizing of a whole universe is no less apparent.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A collection of shots and characters designed to circle the globe rather than to say anything much about either the filmmakers or the audience, a triumph of multinational capital at work rather than of people or ideas.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This doesn't exactly set the world on fire, but I was charmed by its old-fashioned storytelling, which is refreshingly free of archness, self-consciousness, or "Kill Bill"-style wisecracks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Too full of its own heavy breathing to work as the primordial storytelling it's aiming for--a so-so adventure story is closer to the mark.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's hard to think of a deadlier shotgun marriage than Jacques Tourneur's poetry of absence and Spielbergian uplift, but Shyamalan has patented the combo, adding pretentious camera movements that are peculiarly his own--even the jokes are pretty solemn.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An episodic thriller that certainly has its moments, but eventually peters out into dull formula standbys; Eastwood's Harry seems weary of his own sarcastic witticisms, and the ones here won't make anybody's day.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nobody seems to know quite what he's doing in this opulent but fairly empty period fashion show, apart from campy overactors like Christopher Walken and Jonathan Pryce who appear eager to fill the voids left by their colleagues.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One reason why it disappoints is that it comes across as more the work of screenwriter Laura Jones ("An Angel at My Table," "The Portrait of a Lady," "A Thousand Acres"), who's lately been specializing in high-minded literary adaptations, than of Armstrong, who tends to do better and more nuanced work with more intimate and domestic material (e.g., "The Last Days of Chez Nous," "Little Women").
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The new version has its share of disturbing moments, but writer James Gunn and director Zack Snyder have stripped away the social satire of the original and put little in its place.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not so much ill conceived and misdirected as unconceived and undirected, this is folly on a grand scale.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Freeman's God is a mix of Old and New Testament, with a dash of both sexism and sitcom; Carell's Noah is a political fool, but that only proves he's honest and sincere. This is idiotic, but it's so good-natured I didn't mind.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The stylistic discontinuities and pile-driver excesses can be off-putting for an outsider like me, but for fans this may well be part of the appeal.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Alternately mawkish and strident, with lots of fades to white and dog reaction shots, this can be recommended only for its good intentions.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In spirit, if not in letter, it often resembles a gritty Warners crime movie of the 30s, and it held my interest in spite of its excesses.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This exudes trendiness at regular intervals, and otherwise manages to be reasonably charming about Manhattan's melting pot culture, but my general response was still "Wake me when it's over."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Disappointingly conventional though well-made...An OK teen movie, but not a whole lot more.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The bursts of sex and violence that earned this picture an NC-17 rating offer only temporary respite from the encroaching dullness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In short, it's amusing only if you agree not to think very much about it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Clint Eastwood resurrects the star system, the Hollywood love story, and middle-aged romance, but despite all his craft and sincerity, he and screenwriter Richard LaGravenese can't quite turn Robert James Waller's cardboard best-seller into flesh and bone.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Thanks to the performers (including Andie MacDowell and John Turturro), this has a certain amount of charm and warmth, but the period ambience feels both remote and uncertain.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Working with a shapeless script, directors Anthony and Joe Russo (Welcome to Collinwood) can't figure out what they're making. They lunge in several directions, but fail to get around the central problem: most of their actors have little flair for comedy.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I'm far from being a fan of the sport, but the boxing sequences held me and the overall atmosphere appears reasonably authentic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It seems more like an illustration of his (Kaufman) script than a full-fledged movie, proving how much he needs a Spike Jonze or a Michel Gondry to realize his surrealistic conceits.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brooks has an uncanny talent for making us feel insightful.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    On its own modest terms, this romp delivers.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Haven't we seen this already?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The problem with all the time-travel high jinks, involving multiple versions of the major characters (a gimmick that Robert Heinlein handled much better in stories like “By His Bootstraps” and “All You Zombies—”), is that in order to make the plot even semiintelligible, writer Bob Gale and director-cowriter Robert Zemeckis have to turn all these characters into strident geeks and make the frenetic action strictly formulaic.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The filmmakers treat all the characters, not to mention the audience, as sitcom puppets.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Fairly strong on period atmospherics, but it mainly adds up to yet another pointless adaptation of a literary standby.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At least the special effects and outer space vistas are more handsome than usual.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As an action thriller with music by Isaac Hayes it's not bad.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While billed as a romance and a thriller, the film strictly qualifies as neither, appealing to our prurience, guilt, hatred, and dread.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tim Burton's new movie is gorgeous -- shot by shot it may be the most impressive thing he's done.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Seems perfectly timed to coincide with the ascension to office of George W. Bush. It's a clunky effort Bush could have written and directed.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Moderately watchable but awfully predictable.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's a mechanical desire to work in as many outlandish twists as possible, and shallow grotesquerie quickly takes over.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main problem here is the gross inferiority of the new version to the old: compare Tracy's handling of the opening monologue with Martin's and you'll get a fair indication of what's become of commercial filmmaking over the past four decades.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Teen romance and operetta-style singing replace the horror elements familiar to moviegoers, and director Joel Schumacher obscures any remnants of classy stage spectacle with the same disco overkill he brought to "Batman Forever."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The sensibility is Southern California Witless, and the jokey intertitles that periodically take up half the 'Scope frames ("This is a comedy. Sort of.") are even more smarmy than the characters.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This has its moments, but most of these are engulfed by the overall murk.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Jonathan Kaplan clearly has a feel for the material, but he's at the mercy of a pedestrian script by David Arata and producer Adam Fields.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The actors make this fun if you can overlook the ludicrous view of Jeremy Leven's screenplay.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Cutesy and unconvincing parable.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unfunny and instantly forgettable comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Reasonably entertaining spy-versus-spy shenanigans were for me partially undercut by the hypocritical pretense that the CIA and its various forms of mischief were somehow being ridiculed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I wasn't exactly engaged, but this time boredom never took over.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Stupid, vicious, and pretentious, though you may find it worth checking out if you want to experiment with your own nervous system.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Of course the movie's real raison d'etre is watching Ice Cube tear up government facilities and blockades with a tank, spout Schwarzenegger-style kiss-off lines, and commandeer the kind of babes and high-tech cars that James Bond usually plays with.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Its resolution reeks of phoniness and self-congratulation, even if some of the narrative strands leading up to it are fairly absorbing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even though it stars Albert Finney, this is a picture of no importance, undone mainly by its self-ingratiated cuteness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's more soul to be found in any Kong close-up than in this film's overplayed reactions, which are used to instruct us what we should be feeling at any given moment. This is never boring, but I can't recall another Spielberg film that left me with a more hollow feeling.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It isn't very good, but it doesn’t seem to care, which turns out to be rather refreshing.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The material is familiar, the Berkeley locations are strictly boilerplate, and there are times when the characters seem more like high school students than college kids.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The actors do a pretty good job, though not good enough to sustain 133 minutes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Handsomely mounted and stylishly directed but otherwise rather unpleasant.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The martial arts choreography is neither graceful nor exciting--it's worthy of a video game. Only after cars, trucks, and a motorcycle join the action--easily outclassing all the actors--does the movie take on a modicum of vitality.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Seems intentionally slapdash and stupid, but when one of them referred to Europe as a "country," I wasn't sure if it was meant as a joke or not. Even so, I laughed once or twice.

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