For 1,493 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Lowest review score: 0 Good Luck Chuck
Score distribution:
1,493 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I expected to emerge depressed by how long these stories have gone untold, but the speakers' courage and humanity are a shot in the arm.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite the familiar story arc and MTV visuals, Bendinger puts this across with a certain amount of pizzazz, and the competitive gymnastics are often spectacular.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A potent feminist protest--all the more so because some of the laws depicted are still in force today.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's far more ambitious than its predecessor and suffers from too many ideas rather than too few, making it an inspired, fascinating, and revealing mess.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Klapisch self-consciously throws fistfuls of quirky film style at us, as if he were Francois Truffaut, but his characters are still interesting and his party sequences are especially good.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Maybe because director Scott Marshall is Garry's son, he allows his affable father to steal the movie from everyone else, and his performance proves to be a small gift worth having.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is every bit as silly and adolescent as you'd expect from Besson, and about as contemporary as "The Perils of Pauline." But I was delighted by the balletic and acrobatic stunts, some of which evoke Tarzan.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite all the silliness the drift races are gripping, and director Justin Lin captures Tokyo's energy and glitter far better than Sofia Coppola.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nihilistic greed was the major factor when GM terminated the car in 2001, though Paine is also careful to note the passivity of the general public.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film tackles more than it can master, but it's never less than fascinating, and all three leads are exceptional.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The three neighborhood kids who venture inside this toothy trap are wittily conceived (as are other characters, like a goth babysitter), but though the overall conception suggests Hayao Miyazaki's "Howl's Moving Castle," the frenetic pacing seems as American as an apple pie in your face.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Betty Thomas, directing a script by TV veteran Jeff Lowell, seems uncertain whether to sympathize with her three heroines or with the title cad, but there's something mildly charming about this cheerful revenge comedy's lack of any straightforward moral agenda.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Provocative but also infuriating, this alarmist documentary argues that the levying of a federal income tax in 1913 was unconstitutional and set America on the road to fascism.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This 2004 French feature seems concerned not so much with the psychopathology of everyday life as with psychopaths who lurk behind the everyday.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite some awkwardness, this feature by writer-directors Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland is a fascinating look at the area's Mexican-American milieu and other local subcultures, full of feeling, insight, and touching performances.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This funny, nervy, and pointedly unrated geriatric sex comedy is both enhanced and occasionally limited by being targeted at baby boomers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Bryan Barber (known for his music videos) and his cast display so much gusto that it's hard to keep up your resistance--I wound up finding this more enjoyable than the Oscar-bestrewn "Chicago."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is somewhat fuzzy as narrative, but it's a potent mood piece, and its portait of urban loneliness has some of the intensity of "Taxi Driver" without the violence.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    O'Neill showed in his 1989 "Water and Power" a poetic feeling for human evanescence in relation to southern California locales; here he proves equally astute at showing how our sense of history becomes tainted by and entangled with Hollywood myths.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Some of Roth's cars become characters, their voices furnished by Ann-Margret, Jay Leno, Brian Wilson, Matt Groening, Tom Wolfe, and others. The pace never flags, and the enthusiasm is infectious.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This first feature by novelist and psychologist Jeremy Leven has a fairly rudimentary mise en scene, but the actors take over the proceedings with aplomb, and Brando and Dunaway have the grace to turn much of the show over to Depp, who carries the burden with ease.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This isn't always adept as storytelling, and Block's coming to terms with his own denseness occasionally tries one's patience, but he manages to make the overall process of his reeducation fascinating and compelling.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I've never read Stella Gibbons's popular English novel of 1932--a parody of the romantic rural novels that Mary Webb wrote during the 20s--but director John Schlesinger and adapter Malcolm Bradbury have gotten plenty of enjoyable mileage out of it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's soon apparent that a closer model for this charming romantic comedy is "Bell, Book and Candle." The direction by Marc Forster (Monster's Ball) is so fluffy it's easy to drift along and ignore the logical lapses.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The plot points verge on the familiar and obvious, but Adams's work with the actors (especially Judd and among the others Jeffrey Donovan, Diane Ladd, Tim Blake Nelson, and Scott Wilson) is so resourceful and focused that she makes them shine.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Agnieszka Holland (Europa Europa, The Secret Garden) directs with obvious feeling rather than cynicism, and I was swept away by it despite the story's anachronisms.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're wondering how Steve Anderson managed to make a 93-minute documentary about the ultimate four-letter word, which uses the epithet over 800 times, you're underestimating his capacity to entertain and educate in roughly equal doses.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    So keenly felt and so deeply imagined I couldn't help but be moved, even grateful for its bleeding-heart nostalgia.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The fictional story here, set between 1984 and 1991, focuses on the investigation of a popular and patriotic playwright (Sebastian Koch); that the captain assigned to his case (touchingly played by Ulrich Mühe) is mainly sympathetic and working surreptitiously on the playwright's behalf only makes this more disturbing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Juliette Binoche won an Oscar for her role in Anthony Minghella's adaptation of "The English Patient", but in many ways I prefer her soulful performance here: portraying a Bosnian Muslim working as a tailor in London, she's reason enough to see Minghella's overcontrived though absorbing 2006 feature based on his original script.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Drawn from a children's book by Croatian illustrator Milan Trenc, this fantasy isn't exactly heavy, but its ideological implications are interesting nevertheless.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film gradually devolves into action-adventure, then the equivalent of a war movie. But the filmmaking is pungent throughout, and the first half hour is so jaw-dropping in its fleshed-out extrapolation that Cuaron earns the right to coast a bit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Confounds expectations -- about slasher stories and about film narrative in general, in part by being closer to a collection of interconnected short stories than to a novel.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This semianimated adventure is enjoyable and imaginative despite its formulaic qualities.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Its giddy stylistics include extravagant use of color and rapid montage, which are said to be a direct homage to legendary Thai independent Ratana Pestonji.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The storytelling is so masterful that Hattendorf doesn't have to spell out the striking parallels between the persecution of Japanese after Pearl Harbor and the harassment of Muslims after 9/11.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Directed by Darrell Roodt from a screenplay by Ron Harwood, this has a strong sense of dignity about its characters, and Jones and Harris are both effective. Whether it deserves to replace the Korda version is another matter.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As frequently happens in both Loach films and history, the betrayal of ideals, socialist and otherwise, leaves a harsh aftertaste, which made me feel sadder but not much wiser.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from some softening of the extreme violence (through manipulations on the sound track) and some fancy intercutting, this is every bit as unpleasant as Olmos can make it, but occasionally edifying as well.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even though he's psychologically expanded his source, the material is a bit too schematic to work as much more than a scaled-down thriller.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This 2005 British feature by writer Anthony Frewin and director Brian Cook, both former Kubrick assistants, uses Conway's unlikely saga to mount an appreciative send-up of a certain style of gay extravagance.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was beguiled by both the eerie moods and the striking compositions, which incorporate large stretches of empty space.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's striking not for its originality but for its energy in juggling familiar elements.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite the thick Scottish accents, filmmaker Andrea Arnold kept me intrigued, but beyond a certain point the movie's ambiguity fades into indifference.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    He resisted commodification by continuously reediting his other films and reworking his live performances--a dazzling legacy that influenced everyone from Warhol to Fellini to John Waters. In some ways Smith's art became commodified only after he died and his estranged sister gained control over his work, though that did lead to this documentary, a fascinating introduction to his special world.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The story has its corny aspects, but thanks to Scott's skill as an image maker and as a storyteller--proceeding from the very blue and very abstract water seen behind the credits to the climactic, extended storm--this is superior to both "Dead Poets Society" (as a tale about a boys' school and its charismatic teacher) and "Apollo 13" (as a true-life action adventure).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Foley has a fine sense of shading in depicting a slightly dysfunctional family. The problem with this subgenre is the way it has to demonize and dehumanize its villains in order to produce the desired effect, which brutalizes the spectator along with the story and characters. If you can accept this limitation, this is a very efficient piece of machinery.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    [It] may not be your cup of tea, but you have to admire the style, sincerity, and overall sense of craft even if you don't fancy the comic-book gore.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ridiculously ambitious, though often likable and touching in its sincerity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Francis Coppola's ambitious 1992 version brings back the novel's multiple narrators, leading to a somewhat dispersed and overcrowded story line that remains fascinating and often affecting thanks to all its visual and conceptual energy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Structurally and dramatically this is all over the place, but stylistically it's gripping, and thematically it suggests an oblique response to the end of Hong Kong's colonial rule.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from Swinton's fine performance, what largely distinguishes this is Brougher's sharp narrative focus.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film isn't averse to reaching for Hollywood fantasies, but there's a lot of what seems to be hard-earned wisdom here about women in bad marriages.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ken Marino, who plays the silliest of the diggers, wrote the script, and when it isn't straining after elegiac moments, it's fresh and unpredictable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This nicely made 1994 comedy-drama could be described as an Australian "Easy Rider," with Sydney drag queens instead of bikers and no apocalyptic ending.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Far from avoiding the tackier implications of this concept, the film revels in them like a puppy in clover; Martin's delivery of the line, "Into the mud, slime queen!" is alone nearly worth the price of admission.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What eventually emerges isn't nearly as achieved or convincing as the neighborhood portrait, but even when it ultimately overwhelms the characters, it's full of juice, humor, and nuance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This runs 192 minutes and has very few jokes, but there are many references to Citizen Kane to put us in the right frame of mind.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    John Woo directed this giddy, mindless jaunt with polish but only a modicum of personal investment from a script by Graham Yost.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're sick of kinky killers and English rip-offs of American genre movies, this terminally bleak and violent 1995 road movie may irritate the hell out of you--unless you're as impressed as I was by Amanda Plummer's performance.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is in some ways my favorite Hartley picture - because it takes the most risks and gives the mind the most to do.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    None of the characters ever rises beyond the level of his or her generic functions, and by the end the overall emptiness of the conception becomes fully apparent.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Attractive black-and-white 'Scope compositions, strong Paris locations, and effective handling of the actors makes this captivating throughout.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The general idea is to exploit a certain amount of role reversal, and Reginald Hudlin, who directed "House Party," does a fairly good job of making this fun.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    But the material is still powerful, and the offbeat story of the patients remains both engrossing and moving even after all this abridgment.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The light ribbing of conspicuous consumption in southern California and the Simon and Garfunkel songs on the sound track both play considerable roles in giving this depthless comedy some bounce. [Review of re-release]
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The subject's nice - a clan of Irish con artists operating in the rural south - but the movie breaks down into separate pieces, some fresher than others, without much cumulative force.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Set on the French Riviera, the movie has the kind of plot that cries out for the stylish treatment that a Billy Wilder could bring to it; without it, the various twists seem needlessly spun out and implausible, although Martin is allowed to show off his brand of very physical comedy to some advantage, and Miles Goodman contributes a pleasant score.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Heckerling still has some of the sensitivity she showed in handling actors in Fast Times at Ridgemont High and she has a deft way of illustrating her heroine's fantasies about possible mates without any fuss.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A corny but sincere weeper written by Jonathan Marc Feldman, directed by Thomas Carter, and shot mainly in Prague.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Goldbacher's story is not always convincing as history, but it's absorbing as a sort of gothic romance and sensually quite potent, and Driver carries it all with grace and authority.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Thanks to a fairly good script, this thriller about a Soviet cop sent to Chicago to apprehend a Soviet drug dealer is a respectable enough star vehicle.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Some of the precise meanings of this Bill Forsyth comedy eluded me, but the vibes couldn't have been nicer.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The postmodernist evocations of the past (roughly the 50s through the 80s) are a charming mishmash, delivered with wit and style.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's entertaining and stylish, though maybe not quite as serious as it wants to be.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even if you can't accept all the movie's left curves, you might still be amused.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There are fewer jokes this time around, and Moore makes a point of not even appearing on-screen for a good 40 minutes, putting more emphasis on his arguments and less on his comic persona.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It reminded me of "Pump Up the Volume" in many ways.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Among the many offhand virtues of Julie Delpy's first feature as solo writer-director is the fact that she's as attentive to French foibles as American ones.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If your taste runs in this direction, you're bound to be amused.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though the filmmaking isn't everything it might have been (the opening montage is especially clumsy), their argument is compelling, absorbing, and urgent.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The third remake of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956) may not be a patch on the original, but it does have a few things the other versions lack.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Searing drama that uses the police procedural to explore the moral and psychological devastation of the Iraq war for U.S. soldiers (and, incidentally, for Iraqi citizens).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This heart-warmer by Robert Benton has some of the tender wisdom and humor of his other features (e.g., Nobody's Fool).
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    May have more heart than head, but it's also just as interesting for what it leaves out of its romantic story as for what it retains.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What emerges is a speculative, critical essay about the 60s, weighted down in spots by political correctness and a conflicted desire to mock Dylan's denseness while catering to his hardcore fans, but otherwise lively, fluid, and watchable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Part of Morton's achievement is to present all four people through the viewpoints of the other three; Wagner can't do that, but the performances are so nuanced that the characters remain multilayered, and they're not the sort of people we're accustomed to finding in commercial films.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Conceived like a sports movie, this delivers passion, nuance, and historical insight along with unnecessary hokum.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This has loads of swagger, but for stylistic audacity I prefer Anderson's more scattershot "Magnolia."
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Kolirin has a fine sense of where to place the camera and when to cut between shots for maximum comic effect, and his two lead actors--Sasson Gabai as the band's conductor and Ronit Elkabetz (Or) as one of the locals--are terrific.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Masterfully charted and adeptly played, but also rather minimalist.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're up for good nihilist entertainment, look no further.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's not much story here, but the characters are substantial: a single mother (nicely played by Juliette Binoche) who runs a local avant-garde puppet theater and is preoccupied with such matters as a downstairs tenant who refuses to pay rent or leave, her neglected but mainly cheerful son, and his Taiwanese nanny, a filmmaker in her spare time.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The character and plot contrivances are dumber than ever, but this is basically vaudeville, not narrative, and the thrills keep coming.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Claude Chabrol's capacity to make shopworn material seem almost new is especially evident in this 2007 drama, which he cowrote with his stepdaughter, Cecile Maistre.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One of the few white vocalists to play the Apollo, O'Day does fabulous things with her hands as well as her voice when she sings. Her talent and will to survive (in the late 60s she kicked a 16-year heroin addiction) are reasons enough to see this film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This isn't a visionary western like "The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada" (2005), but in its own quiet way it delivers the goods.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A somewhat adolescent if stylish antiauthoritarian romp about an irreverent U.S. medical unit during the Korean war
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This keeps one reasonably amused, titillated, and brain-dead for a little over two hours.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I can't yet decide whether the film works or not, but it certainly held me for its full two hours.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was periodically put off by a certain self-conciousness in delivering this material.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What's really fun about this silly but spirited comedy isn't just the ribbing of "swinging London" fashion and social attitudes but the use of the compulsive zooms and split-screen mosaics of commercial movies of the 60s.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ali
    What's lacking here is a sustained thematic focus -- at least five people worked on the script, including Mann, which may account for the absence of a clear through line -- though the spectacle and characters keep one absorbed.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Remains mired in a smart-alecky film-school sensibility.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    So visually striking, so compulsively watchable as storytelling, and so personal even in its enigmas that I found it much more pleasurable than any of the Hollywood genre films I've seen lately.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie is about the interactions between these characters, and though I'm still trying to figure out what all the pieces mean, there's no way I can shake off the experience.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The charm of the three leads makes it a movie worth seeing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Griffith's talent, energy, and sexiness give it some drive and punch.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pretty familiar stuff, but the performances--by Adrien Brody, Elise Neal, Simon Baker-Denny, and Lauryn Hill--are relatively fresh and sincere.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Enjoyable but thin.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The sincerity of their performances (Lopez and Caviezel) overrides the intermittent implausibilities of Gerald Dipego's script.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This one's slightly better than average these days, which means slightly diverting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Its virtues are still genuine and durable enough to resist the blandishments of hype.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This comedy-drama was written by Simon Beaufoy, who brought us "The Full Monty," and it has some of the same gamy mix of alternative sexuality and working-class heart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Norbu tries too hard to please and charm, but his film at least carries the advantages of unactorly faces and a premise based on actual events that dramatizes the issue of religious vocation in a secular world.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A pretty good chronicle of a certain phase of French working-class life.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Takes a while to arrive at what it has to say, but some of the performances kept me occupied in the meantime.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The eroticism is powerful, and the documentary candor and directness of the sex scenes make this well worth seeing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Carax has a wonderful cinematic eye and a personal feeling for editing rhythms, and his sense of overripeness and excess virtually defines him.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Foreigners who argue that Americans are Neanderthal savages can point to this movie as persuasive evidence.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    My only reason to recommend this movie is that there's nothing quite like it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Wears its art, as well as its heart, on its sleeve -- so much so that I feel guilty for not liking it more.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An Austin Powers movie for grown-ups.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're looking to be romantically captivated, this movie just might do the job.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A strong example of the cinema verite style at work, yet few films of the school show up the crisis of its "noninvolvement" policy more tellingly.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This thriller is a lot better than you might expect--especially for a Kevin Costner vehicle.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Friedkin does a superb job of serving up the well-appointed script by James Webb and Stephen Gaghan.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As old-fashioned movie fun, this isn't bad, even -- especially? -- when it skirts the edge of silliness, and it's better than the 1960 George Pal version.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The script dawdles, and in spite of a good cast--Bill Paxton, Billy Bob Thornton (who's especially resourceful), Bridget Fonda, and Brent Briscoe--the movie tends to amble around its points rather than drive straight toward the heart of the matter.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At some point in this endless thriller the suspense turns into an extremely unpleasant ordeal that Dahl doesn't know when to stop.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Narrative continuity and momentum have never been among Hopper's strong points, and this time the choppiness of the storytelling diffuses the dramatic impact without offering a shapely mosaic effect (as in [his] previous films) to compensate for it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The larger considerations and film noir overtones detract too much from the facts of the case, and what emerges are two effective half-films, each partially at odds with the other.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If, like the filmmakers, you're willing to settle for a myth that flatters your sensibilities and shortchanges the past, you're likely to find some agreeable kicks here.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    All in all, an entertaining (if ideologically incoherent) response to the valorization of greed in our midst, with lots of Rambo-esque violence thrown in, as well as an unusually protracted slugfest between ex-wrestler Roddy Piper and costar Keith David.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As usual, Tarantino's sense of fun is infectious but fairly heartless.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is the apotheosis of Classics Illustrated filmmaking, aiming at nothing more than tasteful reduction, and the fact that it's done so well here doesn't mean that it's necessarily worth doing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even as a simple genre picture it works only in fits and starts.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Very slickly and glibly put together, with a sharp eye for yuppie decor and accoutrements; even Woody's habitual, fanciful vision of an all-white New York is respected.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    According to common usage, the French word stupide comes closer to silly than to dumb, which is how I might rationalize my affection for this harebrained, obvious, but euphoric tale.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Led me to second thoughts about whether the feel-good tactics of "Schindler's List" were any worse than the feel-bad tactics on display here.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's something stirring and gutsy about this evocation of collective ferment -- not to mention timely, in the wake of the Seattle uprising against the World Trade Organization.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I seem to be in a distinct minority in finding the satire toothless, obvious, and insufferably glib -- Still, I found genuine pleasure in watching Catherine Zeta-Jones, Renee Zellweger, Richard Gere, and John C. Reilly try their hands at singing and dancing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Storper is pretty good at playing with and against certain western cliches in his treatment of the good guys (including Annette Bening's character), but resorts to pure cliche when it comes to the villians (e.g., Gambon and James Russo).
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you like being shaken up and don't care too much why or how, this is probably for you; Huppert gives her all to the part, and you won't be bored.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Enjoyably campy hokum.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Singleton shows some genuine talent in handling character and action, and equal amounts of confusion and attitude when it comes to matters of gender and ghetto politics.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As a moral reconsideration of the role of violence in previous Eastwood films, this is strong and sure, and characters who play against genre expectations give the film a provocative aftertaste. The only limitation, really, is that the picture hasn't much dramatic urgency apart from its revisionist context.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's slight but likable, and diverting enough as light entertainment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If Wahlberg in a beret is your idea of fun, don't let me get in your way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While its slender plot (stripper Karina wants a baby and turns to Belmondo when her boyfriend Brialy won't oblige her) can irritate in spots, the film's high spirits may still win you over.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Silly and shameless stuff that made me laugh quite a lot.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As a literary bodice ripper this is better than average, partly because of its glimpses of early-19th-century bohemianism in France and Italy but mostly because Juliette Binoche and Benoit Magimel manage to keep the story hot and unpredictable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Lacks the scariness, the mystery, and even much of the curiosity of Rivette's better work.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Thornton seems born to play the sort of slow-witted poet of the mundane that the Coens find worthy of their condescending affection.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    On the very edge of coherence -- but I find its decadent erotic poetry irresistible.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    8MM
    I can't say I warmed to the results, but I was solidly held for the film's two hours.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The problem, as always, is that when you try to mix cliches with more complicated data it's often the cliches that win out.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One gets a pungent look at what makes being a pimp look attractive to some people in certain circumstances.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The cast--including Julianna Margulies, Olivia Williams, James Coburn, and Anjelica Huston--keeps this pretty watchable, and casting Mick Jagger as director of the escort service was inspired.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Denzel Washington's directorial debut reminds me of a 60s British movie called "The Mark": it's liberal minded, heartwarming, sincere, and consequently somewhat old-fashioned and stodgy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Maybe I've seen too many James Bond movies by now, or maybe the trouble with this 20th installment is that the filmmakers are trying too hard to top the excesses of the predecessors.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At times the plot developments in this post-Tarantino story seem so random they suggest automatic writing, but the characters and some of the settings kept me interested.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sincere, capable, at times moving, but overextended, this picture is seriously hampered by its tendency to linger over everything--especially landscapes with silhouetted figures, and not excluding its own good intentions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Everyone who likes this movie calls it "disturbing," but what disturbs me most is the self-loathing laughter it provokes, similar to what one often hears at Woody Allen and Michael Moore comedies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The English cast is fun; but this is more spectacle than story, and the Steve Kloves script deserves better handling than director Chris Columbus -- plus any number of studio deliberators -- gave it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unfortunately, once the freshness of the concept wears off, the same premise starts to feel mechanical and willful.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The characters are so full-bodied and the feelings so raw and complex that I'd call this the best thing he's (Singleton) done to date.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main problem is that Burton operates best on a modest scale; saddled with a blockbuster, he doesn't know how to animate all the dead space.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film asks us to embrace not only the death of beauty but the beauty of death.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I found it more pleasurable as a time waster than either "Mission: Impossible."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Perhaps the post-cold-war attitudes behind this film are progressive, but the same old pre-nuclear-war worship of the military goes all but unchallenged.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not at all bad for a toy commercial.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This adaptation of Patricia Highsmith's novel is commercial to the core.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The script by producer David Franzoni, John Logan, and William Nicholson is serviceable but not exactly inspired.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't see this slightly better-than-average drug thriller, with slightly better-than-average direction by Steven Soderbergh, as anything more than a routine rubber-stamping of genre reflexes.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though its ending feels protracted--especially the climactic chase--it kept me reasonably distracted.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I was engaged by Chick's characters...But that point passed pretty soon after the credits rolled, and nothing has come back to haunt me since.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This 1998 film held my interest for two hours, even taking on an epic feel when it turns into a road movie. It's not bad by any means, but it also happens to resemble a lot of other movies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like Fellini's "I vitelloni," this Spanish-French-Italian coproduction is a bittersweet epic about frustration and relative inertia, though with a somewhat older and wiser group of layabouts.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's full of scenic splendors with a fine sense of scale, but its narrative thrust seems relatively pro forma, and I was bored by the battle scenes.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A seemingly mad dog periodically turns into a well-trained pet.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Broder's script makes the weird transition from satire to camp as if there were no distinction between the two. It's a bracing if at times bewildering experience.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    All the virtues of the original... are present here, though when Cameron tries to milk some sentiment out of the "personality" and fate of his top machine he comes up flat and empty, and the other characters are scarcely more interesting.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unafraid to look absurd but lacks the self-conviction needed to come off as camp.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Maybe you'll enjoy it, but don't expect to remember it ten minutes later, or even to believe in the characters while you're watching them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The result is grimly "effective," but it made me long for Hollywood junk.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Diverting, energetic, and even reasonably satisfying, so long as you aren't looking for a real musical to take its place.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Missing is most of Tarkovsky's contemplative and mystical poetry (which is why it's 90 minutes shorter), and added are some unfortunate Hollywood-style designer flashbacks -- The story is still strong and haunting, but I'd recommend seeing this, if at all, only after the Tarkovsky.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Overall it's what it aspires to be--a pleasant time-waster.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though this drifts at times as storytelling, it's mainly lightweight but personable fun.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I can't think of another film remotely like it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The banal score seems more appropriate for a western, and there's a certain self-conscious theatricality in the mise en scene, yet this is both handsome and affecting.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It reeks of unearned profundity, but I found it entertaining.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Stylistically lively and generally well acted. Thematically, however, it's somewhat incoherent.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Binoche is especially effective playing a character that seems to have as many layers as her makeup.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you can get into the spirit of the proceedings, you're likely to find some fun.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Half-funny mockumentary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What's mainly missing is the sort of conviction and passion that gave El mariachi its charge; one feels at almost every moment that Rodriguez is fulfilling a contract rather than saying something he has to say. There's a lot of panache here, but not much inspiration.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The Coens do an efficient job of stamping their signature grotesquerie on sumptuous Beverly Hills and Las Vegas settings and ladling on gallows humor and malice, sometimes with the verve of early Robert Zemeckis.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Quentin Tarantino's lively and show-offy tribute to Asian martial-arts flicks, bloody anime, and spaghetti westerns he soaked up as a teenager is even more gory and adolescent than its models, which explains both the fun and the unpleasantness of this globe-trotting romp.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Provides an interesting introduction to a compelling figure in contemporary pop music.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not quite a thriller and not quite a character study, though with elements of both, the film is limited by its ambiguous relation to history.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Slapdash but good-natured romantic comedy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Watchable if far-fetched movie is seriously marred by its three leads; only Garrel manages to suggest a person rather than a fashion model dutifully following instructions.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Considering that none of the characters is fresh or interesting, it's a commendable achievement that the quality of the storytelling alone keeps the movie watchable and likable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brad Pitt has fun with his secondary part as a pontificating lunatic, but I wish I'd enjoyed the rest of the cast more.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There are times when this leisurely movie seems so much in love with its own virtue and nobility that there's not much room left for the spectator.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's some excellent comedy early on involving the mutual incomprehension of Africans and Americans, though this eventually gives way to solemn, ethnocentric mush about one African's reading of the story of Jesus, demonstrating as usual that sustained subtlety is hardly Spielberg's forte.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The cast is OK, and LaBute still has an eye, but the uses they're put to seem contrived and arty.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Coolidge directs as if the characters were believable human beings--at least until she gets to the end, when Hollywood and fairy-tale conventions have to triumph over humanity and common sense.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Full of high spirits and good vibes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It has plenty of visual sweep, fine action sequences, and, thanks especially to Brad Pitt (as Achilles) and Peter O'Toole (as King Priam), a deeper sense of character than one might expect from a sword-and-sandal epic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is fairly efficient if you can square efficiency with being twice as long as necessary and overly familiar to boot; at least Jackson and Spacey keep it afloat.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There are still plenty of laughs and some inventiveness along the way...although some of the gags and contrived plot moves stumble over their own cuteness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A pleasant, inoffensive, and (quite properly) mindless diversion.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The cast is good and the story affecting, though at times Michael Mayer's direction makes the production seem a little choked up over its own enlightenment. Sissy Spacek is memorable in a secondary role.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This held me, but I was grateful when it released me.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The overall feel is phantasmagoric--pitched, like most of Maddin's work, in the style of a half-remembered late silent feature or early talkie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Well-acted drama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Strictly routine as filmmaking, adhering fairly consistently to the sound-bite approach. But given the subject, there's still a great deal of interest here about the life, art, milieu, and political activity of Ginsberg. (Review of Original Release)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The filmmakers have lovingly retained and expanded on that film's only flaws, some implausible plot details. But even without the same cultural significance, it's still a good story, and the interesting cast.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The tragic and highly "symbolic" death toward the end, which is supposed to illustrate the sins of the parents being visited upon their children, barely resonates at all, because most of the insights are strictly incidental. The film elicits guilty, lascivious chuckles, not analysis.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The results are watchable enough--sometimes funny, sometimes over the top--and fairly fresh, though also a bit calculated.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Mimi Leder directed Michael Schiffer's script, handling some of the action sequences deftly enough to promote the latent idea that people who don't speak English don't deserve to live.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from some unexaggerated notations about American puritanism in the 1940s and '50s, this is more a work of exploration than a thesis, and Condon mainly avoids sensationalism.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sacrifices compelling drama for gratuitous whimsy and big-budget spectacle.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The actors are brilliant, the dialogue extremely clever, and the direction assured. But by the end I couldn't have cared less about any of the characters.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's a story worth telling, though once the participants and the filmmakers start basking in their virtue, the material begins to feel overextended.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Noah Baumbach collaborated on the arch script, whose bittersweet weirdness leaves a residue even as the narrative disintegrates.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is mainly the girl's story, though the numerous southern archetypes out of Tennessee Williams and Carson McCullers (who's explicitly referenced) keep threatening to overwhelm her.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Bridges and Allen are so bracingly good that you're encouraged to overlook how manipulative the proceedings are.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As disposable fun, this is every bit as enjoyable and as forgettable as most Hollywood equivalents.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    DuBowski focuses on religious faith as much as sexual preference, which may be the most interesting aspect of the film.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This meticulous but ultimately rather pedestrian drama gradually won me over as a minor if watchable example of the "victory through defeat" brand of military heroism that John Ford specialized in.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    On a mindless exploitation level this is pretty good, but on other levels it seems to make promises that it fails to deliver on; none of the deaths carries any moral weight, and the climactic special-effects free-for-all tends to drown out all other interests.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The results are easy to watch, though awfully familiar and simpleminded.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Alas, most of the surprise and the wit to be found here ends with the title.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brainlessly efficient action thriller.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If one discounts the facile and unconvincing ending, this first feature by Guka Omarova, offers a convincingly bleak view of how a 15-year-old boy could get ahead in rural Kazakhstan in the early 90s.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    To call this "Farrelly brothers lite" may be a little redundant, but aside from the odd vomit gag, it goes relatively easy on their usual working-class taboo busting.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I guess one out of three ain't bad.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Formulaic but fairly well-done.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Ron Howard, an exemplar of honorable mediocrity, reunites with actor Russell Crowe and screenwriter Akiva Goldsman of "A Beautiful Mind" for this epic treatment of a seven-year stretch (1928-'35) in the career of New Jersey boxer James J. Braddock.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you don't mind the telegraphed punches of Ruth Epstein's script and Harvey Kahn's direction, this should carry you along.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is brisk and fun to watch, thanks to the actors...But once you catch the main drift of the plot, it becomes awfully ho-hum.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    You won't be too bored.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As soon as it became clear that this remake has nothing to do with real Georgia moonshiners and everything to do with car chases, smashups, and explosions, I could sit back and enjoy it as good, stupid fun.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Writer-director Alan Rudolph has been remaking his own romantic comedy-dramas for so long now that even when he gives us two couples instead of one or substitutes Montreal for Seattle--both of which he does here--the film still comes out feeling the same.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Falk throws himself into the part and almost single-handedly enables this comedy drama to transcend some of its sitcom limitations.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This thriller is effective if you can accept that--as with some of John Dickson Carr's locked-room mysteries--the trickiness counts more than any plausibility.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If the Disney animated original (1961) -- adapted from Dodie Smith's novel -- tried to approximate live action, this 1996 Disney live-action remake often tries to evoke cartoon.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This obsessive movie, awarded the grand jury prize at the Sundance festival, may not quite live up to its advance billing; the subject is powerful, but the filmmaking often seems slapdash, and the final half hour dithers.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you don't care about such motivations, this is a pretty good thriller, though not one you're likely to remember for very long.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's too bad that Pakula allows this 1993 movie to dawdle after its climax, but prior to that he's adept at suggesting unseen menace and keeping things in motion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nora Ephron, who wrote and directed this, repeatedly alludes to the 1957 "An Affair to Remember" as her principal point of reference, yet at no point does she indicate any awareness of what makes that tragicomic love story sublime and this one merely cutesy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The characters' behavior isn't always believable, and the jerky rhythm takes some getting used to (there may be more attitude here than observation). But the defiant absence of any conventional plot has a cumulative charm.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's full of pain and quirky characters standing at oblique angles to one another, and while it doesn't add up it held me throughout.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is mildly entertaining, though like the puzzles themselves, it favors diversion over wisdom.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Given all the filmed memory pieces about screaming, violent Italian-American families in New York boroughs, I'm not especially thrilled by even a well-made example.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The performances are strong, but the spectator often feels adrift in an overly busy intrigue.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's a noble undertaking, and Eastwood is stylistically bold enough to create a view of combat based mainly on images that are clearly manufactured. (As with "Saving Private Ryan," the movie's principal source is "The Big Red One," whose director, Samuel Fuller, actually experienced the war.) But this is underimagined and so thesis ridden that it's nearly over before it starts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The leads work overtime to make their characters and their relationships pungent, believable, and moving (though with regard to the rest of the cast, the movie seems less focused and confident).
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This arty and moody account of her formation as an artist, as its subtitle declares, is basically invented. Its nerviness only pays off in a few details and in Nicole Kidman's resourcefulness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This curious ecological parable was directed by George Miller (Babe: Pig in the City), who still has an eye and a sense of humor but on this particular outing can't get the script he wrote with three others to make much sense.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This has its moments, but don't expect many fresh insights.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main novelty of this conventional, slight, but charming youth picture is that it's English and therefore more class-conscious than most American equivalents.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A mainly routine Hong Kong action film from fleet and floppy-haired action hero Jackie Chan. It's light on plot and character, but the stunts are well staged.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I enjoyed the invented trailers the directors fold into the mix, but despite the jokey "missing reels," these two full-length features are each 20 minutes longer than they need to be, and neither one makes much sense as narrative.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like "The Hustler," this absorbing Las Vegas story about a professional poker player (Eric Bana) uses gambling to tell a tale of moral regeneration. But Bana can't carry a picture like Paul Newman, and poker proves less photogenic than pool.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Too bad the overreaching script has to go after effects recalling "Alien," but as a stylistic exercise this still has its chills.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Aiming at a microcosm of American life comparable in some ways to Do the Right Thing, Singleton can't quite justify or explicate his parting message ("unlearn"), but his passion is exemplary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Jonathan Demme's farcical and broad 1988 comedy, written by Barry Strugatz and Mark R. Burns, doesn't really work, but there are plenty of enjoyable compensations.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The dissection of Edwardian repression never gets beyond the dutiful, tasteful obviousness of a BBC miniseries.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Given how bogus the movie is whenever it departs from formula, it's not surprising that the funniest bit (in which Peter Parker becomes a disco smoothie) is stolen from Jerry Lewis's "The Nutty Professor" or that the best special effects, involving a gigantic Sandman, dimly echo "King Kong."
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The efforts to plant this story in a contemporary vernacular are not always successful but the performances are uniformly fine in their adherence to the material, and consistently avoid any vulgarity or showboating.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sam Raimi tries to do a Sergio Leone, and though this 1995 feature is highly enjoyable in spots, it doesn't come across as very convincing, perhaps because nothing can turn Sharon Stone into Charles Bronson.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The unvarnished quality of some of the acting limits this effort in spots, but the quirky originality of the story, characters, and filmmaking keeps one alert and curious.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The performances of both Schwarzenegger and O'Brien are labored, the pacing uneven, and maybe only half the gags work, but there's a certain amount of creative energy and audacity mixed in with all the confusion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is stronger in terms of characters (male ones, that is) than in terms of story or mise en scene, but the actorskeep this pretty watchable.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Script and direction are both fairly slapdash, but the actors and the overall sweetness keep this chugging along on some level .
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    George Lucas produced and Jim Henson (of Muppets fame) directed this heftily budgeted 1986 fantasy, which seems to be a conscious attempt to play on the female coming-of-age themes of classic fairy tales.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Individually these elements are powerful, but they fail to mesh or collide with one another in any satisfying way, and the movie's score only exacerbates the problem.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Breillat may be serious about creating period ambience, but she also can't resist patterning her heroine after Marlene Dietrich's Concha in "The Devil Is a Woman" (even though Argento sometimes suggests Maria Montez in the pleasure she takes in her own company).
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For torture and violence freaks, every clank and thud is duly and hyperbolically registered.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Pretty enjoyable as a piece of campy sleaze--especially for the first half hour, before the storytelling starts to dawdle.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Well crafted and mindless in the best Hollywood tradition.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The modeling of human figures and the sense of depth are both impressive; the characters themselves are mainly idiotic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A talking bulldog named Frank steals the show.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Standard-issue liberal feel-good fodder.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nobody seems to know quite what he's doing in this opulent but fairly empty period fashion show, apart from campy overactors like Christopher Walken and Jonathan Pryce who appear eager to fill the voids left by their colleagues.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I could have done without all the pushy tactics of this romantic comedy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not very believable, even in relation to its own premises, but if you were charmed by "Somewhere in Time" and/or Jack Finney's novel "Time and Again," this might charm you as well.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This made-for-cable opus, halfway between documentary and docudrama, is willing to try anything and everything except for a consistent relationship to its material.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The passionate and carnivalesque sense of politics reminded me at times of "Dog Day Afternoon," but despite the absence of cynicism this is a 90s story in every sense of the word
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The execution of the script is perfect, as always, but it's the laziest script Brooks has ever directed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A multifaceted misfire from writer-director Steven Zaillian.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This goofball comedy is easy to take and just as easy to leave alone--unless you develop an affection for the hapless characters, which isn't too hard to do.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Documentary filmmaker Chuck Workman has a slick and entertaining way of stitching together old footage and practically no analytical or historical insight at all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What's most conspicuously missing is the kind of background information needed to assess many of Eichmann's statements.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Somewhere in writer-director Giuseppe Tornatore's overstyled movie, about a 12-year-old boy (Sulfaro) during the Italian fascist period who has the hots for a mistreated war widow (Belluci), is a pretty good short story about the fickleness of community and the cruelty of gossip struggling to get out.