Jonathan Rosenbaum
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For 1,493 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Absolute Wilson
Lowest review score: 0 Psycho
Score distribution:
1,493 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Contradictions confound certain aspects of this project--such as the language spoken by Pocahontas (which, in the Hollywood tradition, oscillates between tribal talk and the unaccented chatter of a contemporary Valley girl)--but overall this seems like a reasonable stab at an impossible agenda.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This gets very suspenseful (as well as fairly gruesome) in spots, and if it never adds up to anything profound, it's still a welcome change to have a lesbian couple as the chief identification figures.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A few of the set pieces are fussy or overly extended, but the rest is tolerable bone-crunching diversion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The real revelation here is Streep, who spends every moment comically negotiating her conflicted impulses.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Before this turns to total mush, it's a quirky, fitfully effective fantasy periodically enlivened by the cast.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The title modifies a term coined by political scientist and philosopher Arthur Bentley that refers to the interactions between people and their environment, and the notion of a shifting center is what gives this experiment much of its interest and also limits it from going very far in any single direction.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though it lacks the sensational pizzazz of "Blackboard Jungle", the politics here are arguably somewhat better, and the supporting cast -- George Dzundza, Courtney P. Vance, Robin Bartlett, Beatrice Winde -- isn't bad either.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Terse and fatalistic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is the kind of tasteful tearjerker that's often overrated and smothered with prizes because it flatters our tolerance and sensitivity.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The potential for moral confusion in a liberal-minded family -- unpacked so ruthlessly in Noah Baumbach's "The Squid and the Whale" -- is scrutinized with more ambiguity in this good-natured comic subversion of the holiday get-together.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An efficient genre piece with a few provocative metaphysical trimmings; the mainly English cast is effective.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brooks's sweetness, innocence, and boundless love of the infantile inform everything from the brassy production numbers (capped by an homage to Jailhouse Rock) to the final credits.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The comedy is extremely broad (with Curtis eliciting almost as many laughs as Schwarzenegger), the action sequences are as well crafted as one can expect from Cameron, and the meaning is as root basic as anyone would wish.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Chen Kaige clearly intended this Chinese fantasy-action spectacle to top Zhang Yimou's "Hero," and I must admit that I prefer it to the earlier movie: the digital effects are sometimes excessive, yet Chen's story of a loyal slave, his master, and a wealthy, seemingly doomed princess is more affecting, especially in the closing stretch.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Brooks' film is especially welcome now because it frankly admits that most Americans are ignorant about Muslims and have a lot to learn, in contrast with the few other Hollywood movies dealing with Muslims -- "Syriana," "Munich" -- which seem to suggest that non-Muslim viewers can emerge knowing the score.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This farce eventually runs out of steam, devolving into a protracted docudrama about actor Steve Coogan (who plays the title hero as well as his father), but until then this is a pretty clever piece of jive.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The deft arabesques of cinematographer Andrzej Bartkowiak juice up the suspense, and if you're not too put off by the sheer ridiculousness of the story you won't be bored.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    "Bill & Ted's Aurora Adventures" might almost serve as the subtitle for this very silly but enjoyable 1992 comedy, developed from characters introduced on Saturday Night Live--heavy-metal fans (Mike Myers and Dana Carvey) with a cable access show in Aurora, Illinois.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Playwright Adam Rapp, making his feature debut as writer-director, details the family dysfunction to the point of hyperbole, but over the long haul he rewards one's observation and intelligence and a more interesting story emerges.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Based on a true story, the movie was nominated for an Oscar as best foreign film; some might castigate its unabashed sentimentality, but I found myself moved, especially when I recalled that this was supposedly the war to end all wars.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Reasonably lifelike and nicely acted (Keener is especially good), but otherwise nothing special, this is an OK light comedy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    To Towne's credit, he's a thoughtful and conscientious romantic. He skillfully makes the two main characters a hot, volatile couple, deftly staging their courtship as if it were an erotic grudge match.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The three parts add up to a rather lumpy narrative, and the characters are perceived through a kind of affectionate recollection that tends to idealize them, but they're so beautifully realized that they linger like cherished friends.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This may be the most Brechtian thing Lumet has ever done -- a movie that repeatedly challenges us to think and then to reconsider.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Gross-out horror comedy is my least favorite genre, but this movie's so skillful I have to take my hat off to it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This inspirational vehicle, based on a true story, is as hokey as it sounds, and it sometimes cuts too fast to allow us to see the dancing properly. But as in "Saturday Night Fever," the sense of reality giving way to fantasy on a dance floor is potent, and writer Dianne Houston and director Liz Friedlander are so sincere that they make much of it work.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The CGI characters seem less like artwork than humans wearing animal suits, but despite the overall ugliness and sitcom timing, this has enough action, violence, and invention to keep kids amused.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In her third feature Nicole Holofcener leapfrogs between characters with wit and grace, gathering them in various clusters and adroitly showing how money or the lack thereof really does inflect their lives and interactions.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This deconstructive, minimalist comedy, like his 1990 "A Little Stiff" and 1994 "I Don't Hate Las Vegas Anymore," re-creates events with the vain self-deprecation of one of his role models, Woody Allen.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The notion that Page, like Marilyn Monroe, was too ditzy to know what she was doing is more a mythological construct than an observation.

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