For 1,493 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Saddest Music in the World
Lowest review score: 0 The Long Kiss Goodnight
Score distribution:
1,493 movie reviews
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An intermittently enjoyable bad movie that never knows when to stop.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Dispenses so many rubber masks to allow the characters to swap identities that no hero or villain winds up carrying any moral weight at all.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The surface activity keeps one occupied, but never adds up to much because none of the characters is developed beyond the cartoon level; and the snobby sense of knowingness that's over everything is uncomfortably close to what the movie is supposed to be dissecting.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Cutesy and unconvincing parable.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Characters remain stuck in their cliche profiles, and the direction -- by music video specialist Michel Gondry -- doesn't improve matters.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Thematically the film starts off like “The Believer,” Henry Bean's 2001 drama about an anti-Semitic Jew, and winds up like “Sullivan's Travels” without the comedy.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A so-so romantic comedy.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The stunt work is pretty good, the brain work close to nonexistent.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The attempt to extract the essences of several genres (cold-war submarine thriller, love story, Disney fantasy, pseudomystical SF in the Spielberg mode) and mix them together ultimately leads to giddy incoherence.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Oscillating back and forth between insulting its two central characters (Muriel and her dad) and showing they have hidden depths, this movie only shows true tact and understanding when it comes to flattering the audience; everyone on screen is strictly up for grabs.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Jonathan Kaplan clearly has a feel for the material, but he's at the mercy of a pedestrian script by David Arata and producer Adam Fields.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not so much a sequel to "The Fugitive" as a lazy spin-off that imitates only what was boring and artificially frenetic about that earlier thriller; the little that kept it interesting.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Most of this is silly, dim-witted stuff, but a few of the shocks carry some of the crude power of Jack Arnold's low-budget horror films of the 50s.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Seems perfectly timed to coincide with the ascension to office of George W. Bush. It's a clunky effort Bush could have written and directed.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Dopey but charming.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Woody Allen at his most inconsequential and insubstantial; don't expect to remember this black-and-white throwaway of comic sketches five minutes after it's over.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The heroes (Kilmer, Derek Luke) are all totally good, the villains (Ed O'Neill, William H. Macy) are all totally bad, and the macho one-liners are sufficiently adolescent to produce the desired snickers. I tried very hard to imagine I was somewhere else.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Maybe the magic will work for those who loved the book, but I found this film stultifyingly self-important and, despite the regularity with which it cuts to the chase, weirdly static.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's something offensive about the movie's chintzy view of death and the way it periodically flirts with promising conceits (i.e., Goldberg offering her body as a surrogate so that Swayze and Moore can "touch" one another) only to back away from them in as cowardly a manner as possible.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Cassavetes's “Gloria” may have been action-packed nonsense, but it was enjoyable precisely because it was all of a piece. This Gloria is simply pieces--a few of them enjoyable, most of them not.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Oscillates bewilderingly between contrived and insightful, mechanical and sincere, clumsy and graceful.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Jon Voight, the all-purpose villain, does a pretty good job of imitating Marlon Brando imitating a Paraguayan snake expert, but the rest of the players--including Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Eric Stoltz, Owen Wilson, Vincent Castellanos, Jonathan Hyde, and Kari Wuhrer--seem to be in a hurry to pick up their checks.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Stupid, vicious, and pretentious, though you may find it worth checking out if you want to experiment with your own nervous system.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though the look aspires as usual to be both otherworldly and familiar, there's nothing that doesn't reek of southern California (as opposed to Hollywood) plastic, and this is as true of the characters as the decor.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Apart from the welcome grace and pluck of Asian action star Michelle Yeoh--who all but steals the movie away from Pierce Brosnan's Bond and single-handedly makes this a better wedding of Hong Kong and Hollywood than either Rumble in the Bronx or Face/Off--this film has no personality whatsoever.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The first third or so offers all the dominatrix fantasies one might wish for, but then fantasy gives way to the aggressiveness of the special effects and optical effects.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Howard, as usual, seems bent on mixing genres to make several movies at once--monster movie, crime movie, coming-of-age movie, and action-adventure movie (among others)--yielding an overall narrative that's not boring but not especially suspenseful or focused either.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    On the plus side, it isn't boring, and Jolie and Ethan Hawke, who plays an art dealer and key witness, generate a certain amount of edgy chemistry. But eventually the filmmakers' desire to shock and tease overtakes any feeling for character or common sense.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Has some flavor, and Ron Silver gives a swell impersonation of a cool and slimy studio executive.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The first half is better than average for an opulent Classics Illustrated film, thanks to realistic period detail, brisk storytelling, and Reese Witherspoon as the saucy rags-to-riches Becky Sharp. Then the whole lumbering weight of the production catches up with the filmmakers, slowing the proceedings to an interminable crawl.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Reasonably entertaining spy-versus-spy shenanigans were for me partially undercut by the hypocritical pretense that the CIA and its various forms of mischief were somehow being ridiculed.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Naim's premise has possibilities, but its execution often feels slapdash -- the viewer's sense of deja vu may be even more excessive than the characters'.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Lost me early on with its show-offy shooting and editing, portentous metaphysical conceits about winners and losers, and exaggerated displays of evil, violence, and deceit.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As an "Animal House" romp about consumer slackers in a New Jersey mall, it's harmless enough--just don't expect any sort of edge. Smith has left the working class to become just as boring as everybody else.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Drove violence to the point of redundancy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Haven't we seen this already?
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unfunny and instantly forgettable comedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Overlong but watchable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Adapted from a story by Joe R. Lansdale, this might have squeaked by as a half-hour "Twilight Zone" episode, albeit with jokes about toilets and erections in old age.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Dopey, violent horror thriller.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's more soul to be found in any Kong close-up than in this film's overplayed reactions, which are used to instruct us what we should be feeling at any given moment. This is never boring, but I can't recall another Spielberg film that left me with a more hollow feeling.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An exceptionally glib satire about reality TV, by writer-director Daniel Minahan, that puts most of its effort into looking as much as is possible like a real TV show.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The martial arts choreography is neither graceful nor exciting--it's worthy of a video game. Only after cars, trucks, and a motorcycle join the action--easily outclassing all the actors--does the movie take on a modicum of vitality.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The actors do a pretty good job, though not good enough to sustain 133 minutes.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's been a month since I attended a preview, and I'm more grateful than sorry that I no longer remember it well. Drug thrillers and revenge plots bore me.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Its resolution reeks of phoniness and self-congratulation, even if some of the narrative strands leading up to it are fairly absorbing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unfortunately writer-director Paul Feig has a weakness for artiness in general and hokey art movies in particular, and the overall sluggishness of this 2003 adaptation starring Ben Tibber makes such devices as slow-motion seem like mannered rhetoric.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Lee has tried hard to give this shapeless picture some visual patterning though the cluttered effect created by his mistrust of silence is even more harmful than in the past.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Seems intentionally slapdash and stupid, but when one of them referred to Europe as a "country," I wasn't sure if it was meant as a joke or not. Even so, I laughed once or twice.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If this were witty, it might have qualified as a downtown version of "All About Eve"; if it were believable, I wouldn't have come away feeling that the actors (including Dylan McDermott and Chloe Sevigny) were wasted.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tim Burton's new movie is gorgeous -- shot by shot it may be the most impressive thing he's done.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is the silliest horror movie I've seen in years, though some of the special effects are pretty good.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It isn't very good, but it doesn’t seem to care, which turns out to be rather refreshing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you've never seen the lovely Wenders film, maybe you'll be charmed by this low-grade variation, all of whose best qualities--such as the airy crane shots poised over city vistas and freeways--can be traced back to the original; otherwise you might run screaming from the theater.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A piece of cheese without much flavor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    May
    McKee's direction of actors is as clumsy as the stabs at rapid editing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As usual Spielberg is too bored by everyday life to use his premise for anything but a fairy tale, whose cheap pathos suggests a bad Chaplin imitation. This grows progressively phonier and eventually devolves into "Mr. Roberts," with Stanley Tucci filling in for James Cagney as an airport bureaucrat.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you decide to hit the concessions stand (where you're bound to have lots of company), I'd suggest going out for popcorn during either the first hour or the third, because the second features some pretty good big-screen effects involving planes, ships, and explosions.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unfortunately this is much tamer than it had to be--Rudnick Lite, meaning on the edge of evaporation.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tierney and Hackman contribute most to keeping this life-size and funny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The double crosses are so intricate and the cynicism so enveloping that it becomes increasingly difficult to care about the characters
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Teen romance and operetta-style singing replace the horror elements familiar to moviegoers, and director Joel Schumacher obscures any remnants of classy stage spectacle with the same disco overkill he brought to "Batman Forever."
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Its main source is a comic book, but it might as well be a computer.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At least it has Bill Murray.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Material so bereft of plot and insight that all it can provide is actorly turns with no cogent means for tying them together.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    But despite a compelling opening, as a movie it loses focus and purpose as it proceeds.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Behind all the macho bluster stand (or, it would appear, sit) director Tony Scott, writers Michael Schiffer and Richard P. Henrick, and producers Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer, trying (and failing) to get all the characters to behave like grown-ups.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The plot of this 1995 romantic comedy, directed by Jon Turteltaub ("Cool Runnings") from a script by Daniel G. Sullivan and Fredric Lebow, is pretty stupid throughout, and the filmmakers show no compunction in shaking its silliness in your face, but the film's casual warmth may make you tolerate some of the shortcomings.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Joel Schumacher submits to the Wagnerian bombast with an overly busy surface, and the script by Lee and Janet Scott Batchler and Akiva Goldsman basically runs through the formula as if it's a checklist.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even a good performance by Tom Hanks and noble intentions can't save this mainstream look at AIDS from the worst effects of nervous committeethink.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Glitz with no mind and lots of fancy visuals, edited with a pounding beat.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Though it's not unlikable, John Singleton's second feature ("Boyz N the Hood" was his first) is an unholy mess in almost every respect.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While the results are both cheerful and occasionally inventive, they can't hold a candle to his previous features; too many jokey asides and cameos - not to mention an overdose of plot - keep getting in the way.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite very good performances, this is anemic and uninspired filmmaking: shapeless as narrative, awkward and drifting as drama.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    While billed as a romance and a thriller, the film strictly qualifies as neither, appealing to our prurience, guilt, hatred, and dread.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The main problem here is the gross inferiority of the new version to the old: compare Tracy's handling of the opening monologue with Martin's and you'll get a fair indication of what's become of commercial filmmaking over the past four decades.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The liberal pieties underlying the script become so simplistic and predominant that they ultimately deprive the characters and the story of the density and edge they might have had.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The filmmakers treat all the characters, not to mention the audience, as sitcom puppets.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Handsomely mounted and stylishly directed but otherwise rather unpleasant.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Worst of all, the movie's conventional showbiz finale, brimming with false uplift, implies that the traumas of other mutilated and disillusioned Vietnam veterans can easily be overcome if they write books and turn themselves into celebrities.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    John G. Avildsen directs Stallone's primitive script with the corn it calls for, hoping to distract from the simplicity with a few fancy montages, and does a fairly good job with the climactic slugfest; but the dramatic moves are so obvious and shopworn that not even.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite a good deal of witty, bantering dialogue and clever plotting, some interesting moral ambiguity about the relative corruption of a cop (Russell) and a drug dealer (Gibson), and a likable performance by Raul Julia, this film seems overinfected by the kind of southern California narcissism that makes all of the male characters a little too pleased with themselves, with Pfeiffer little more than a beanbag in the little-boy macho games.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Fairly strong on period atmospherics, but it mainly adds up to yet another pointless adaptation of a literary standby.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The sensibility of this movie is so adolescent that it's hard to take it as seriously as the filmmakers intend us to.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    UHF
    Gamely running through parodies of TV commercials and shows, not to mention Spielberg, Schwarzenegger, Stallone, Selznick, and Gandhi, the movie proves to be awful by any standards--feeble, corny, and labored in script as well as direction--although the Capracorn of the basic premise occasionally manages to convey a certain sweetness.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Never gets around to explaining how he (Michael Morra) picked up the moniker Rockets Redglare. In fact, the intimacy of this portrait may be a disadvantage.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Even though it stars Albert Finney, this is a picture of no importance, undone mainly by its self-ingratiated cuteness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The problem with all the time-travel high jinks, involving multiple versions of the major characters (a gimmick that Robert Heinlein handled much better in stories like “By His Bootstraps” and “All You Zombies—”), is that in order to make the plot even semiintelligible, writer Bob Gale and director-cowriter Robert Zemeckis have to turn all these characters into strident geeks and make the frenetic action strictly formulaic.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At least the special effects and outer space vistas are more handsome than usual.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A very well-made genre exercise, but I can’t understand why it’s been accorded so much importance, unless it’s because it strokes some ideological impulse.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director F. Gary Gray doesn't have a clue about how to film this couple dancing, and Peter Steinfeld's crude script confuses character with shtick while racing us through a story where loyalties and motivations turn on a dime.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is mainly a narrative brain-teaser like "Memento" or "The Jacket"; merely keeping up with the game requires so much energy that the thinness of the material becomes fully apparent only toward the end.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This interminable contest between two narcissists, stretched out over many miles and years, is supposed to have something to do with romance.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    To boost this movie's rating to "worth seeing" would make me feel like a publicist or simply a dope.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A deeply stupid and offensive action comedy-romance.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If old-fashioned jolts are what you're after, this nasty piece of merchandise delivers. But so does electroshock.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A film about a junkie rock musician, played by Michael Pitt at his most narcissistic, doing nothing in particular for the better part of 97 minutes isn't my idea of either a good time or a serious endeavor.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The protracted shoot-out at the end of Dear Wendy is even more pornographic than the moment when a female member of the Dandies exposes her breasts. The audience is clearly expected to enjoy the bloodbath even while it disapproves.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Jarhead virtually begins with a rip-off of the basic-training sequence that opens Stanley Kubrick's "Full Metal Jacket."
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jamie Lee Curtis must have a soft spot for the disabled kids of billionaires, because both have cameos near the end of this vulgar and dreadfully dopey enterprise; more impressively savvy is director Penelope Spheeris, who plays herself directing the movie-within-a-movie and manages to seem superfluous in both roles.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The mirthlessly sadistic gags tend to target people in wheelchairs or hospital beds and betray a mild if all-encompassing disgust for the source material and the audience.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    "Sorry, viewers" is more like it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Schwaba's uncertainty as a director is underlined by the almost arbitrary jump cuts, freeze-frames, and sped-up action.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This 2005 farce about a hellish Passover seder panders to middle-class Jews as gleefully as Tyler Perry's movies pander to middle-class African-Americans, though there's less religiosity and a greater degree of self-hatred in the vulgar stereotypes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Torturously dull.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Allen doesn't get us to care much about any of the characters here.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    13 (Tzameti) might seem allegorical, but it’s too cynically concerned with what works as entertainment to offer larger truths about human existence.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite the resourcefulness of the two leads, the movie finally registers as much ado about very little.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This interminable, poorly constructed drug thriller by writer-director Frank E. Flowers sat on the shelf for two years before winning a release.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The unfocused story is so bereft of any clear sense of period or location that the political melodrama sometimes seems to be taking place inside a cigar box.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Mainly it's a shambles, though for once Williams gets to do what he's best at (his stand-up shtick), and the absurd story, no matter how carelessly assembled, keeps moving.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Murphy seems either incapable of or uninterested in creating a recognizable world, so local comic effects count for everything.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The rationale behind this unattractive animated comedy, a U.S.-German coproduction, seems to be that since it can't create a fairy-tale world of its own, it might as well riffle through many of the more familiar ones, with particular emphasis on Cinderella's, pretending to deconstruct them with postmodernist glosses, adolescent wisecracks, and a few high-tech anachronisms.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Based on this outing, writer-director Joe Carnahan (Narc) can't tell a story worth a damn--especially not a complicated mishmash like this one.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's pretty perverse for William Wheeler, who scripted this feature, to get most of the facts wrong, inflating details that don't need any spin. (As Irving himself remarked, "You could call it a hoax about a hoax.")
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    80 minutes of formulaic unpleasantness isn't even close to my idea of a good time, and I doubt that Hitchcock himself could have done very much with Mark L. Smith's script.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Ken Kwapis (The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants) gives this script by many hands a certain gloss it doesn't deserve.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't believe in fixing things that aren't broken. Sandra Nettelbeck's wholly accessible "Mostly Martha" (2001) is one of the most delightful comedies of recent years, so the idea of a remake with English instead of German dialogue is already pretty dubious, an insult to the capacities of both audiences and the original filmmakers.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Unfortunately the movie's more interesting and challenging social aspects, which imply more than one "British-Chinese gay experience," are often overtaken by its smarminess--including an aggressively banal score and the way some actors have apparently been encouraged to overwork their eyebrows.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    You can't be both political and incoherent, and even though Kelly's models are "Kiss Me Deadly" and "Blade Runner," this vision of the near-future suggests a random blend of "Dr. No" and "Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!"
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This anachronistic tale goes beyond Capracorn to evoke Depression-era fare like "One Hundred Men and a Girl" in which the charm is overtaken by mush. One wants to protect this, but it's hard not to gag on the cuteness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The concept was interesting and charming in "Love Letters," up to a point, but here it quickly becomes repetitive, obvious, and dull.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I haven't seen the original, and this mishmash -- doesn't make me want to.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This caper movie starts off as enjoyable guff before turning strictly formulaic and winding up as unenjoyable guff.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Slick and effective escapism with a touch of poetry (a la "The Sixth Sense") that left me vaguely dissatisfied once the mystery was supposedly resolved.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One very sick and messed-up movie.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The script...and Rob Reiner's direction...bristle with phoniness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One more sluggish, artfully framed thriller with Rembrandt lighting set in a New York borough--a kind of picture that's awfully hard to do in a fresh manner.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Humorless, lugubrious, and interminable.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Loaded with facile social themes, opaque characters, pointlessly intricate flashbacks, and inflated technique.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Compels questions about Kinski's bravado and artistry, and suggests that it might not always be easy to distinguish his from Herzog's.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't know the actual budget of this adventure yarn, but it feels like a middle-range effort whose heart is with the bargain-basement offerings of yesteryear.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Thomas is a couch potato as well as a recluse, and a terminal bore to boot. The women, real and simulated, are only slightly more interesting, and then only when they talk back.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Out of Sight engaged me less and less, until by the end I no longer cared which of the characters lived or died. Not even the engaging Jennifer Lopez, George Clooney, Albert Brooks, Don Cheadle, and Ving Rhames or the talented secondary cast can survive the abbreviations and last-minute shoehorning their characters receive.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A tiresome 1998 rip-off of The Hustler, with poker (in a New York Russian Mafia milieu) taking the place of pool, Matt Damon taking over for Paul Newman, and John Malkovich's scenery chewing supplanting Jackie Gleason's self-effacement.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Easy to take but even easier to leave alone.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite a certain grace in the dialogue and casual plot construction, this is positively reeking of a desire to be cheerful in the face of adversity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Laughless, brainless, styleless, and clueless.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    When the cast is shown during the final credits repeatedly cracking up in blown takes, one would like to think they were laughing at some of the lines they were expected to deliver.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Eugene Levy is the only actor who emerges relatively unscathed in such a fetid climate; as for Joan Plowright, I hope she took home a healthy check.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I'm usually a sucker for courtroom dramas, but Rob Reiner's highly mechanical filming by numbers of Aaron Sorkin's adaptation of his own cliched and fatuous Broadway play kept putting me to sleep.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As satire it's toothless and at times close to incoherent; its predictable swipes are aimed equally at conservative racists and bleeding-heart liberals.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A horrendous effort all around.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For the first 100 minutes or so I found this hokey but serviceable; after that my watch became more meaningful than anything I could locate on-screen.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There are a few pretty good design effects en route, but not enough to compensate for all the embarrassments.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is no restoration but a revision...If there's a difference in overall quality, I'm unaware of it. Dave Kehr calls this 1979 feature "an empty-headed horror movie with nothing to recommend it beyond the disco-inspired art direction and some handsome if gimmicky cinematography.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film's hatred of Ricci and Channing and its affectionate tolerance of the hero's mousy hypocrisy and his mentor's negativity are familiar Allen motifs, but the faint echoes of his best work only make this one seem grimmer.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A lot of effort appears to have gone into the glitzy period re-creation, but this is mainly a tearjerker.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Proves that the Disney people can sell just about anything--including a misogynistic celebration of big business and prostitution.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This all-day sucker put me to sleep -- though it's possible I retreated out of self-defense.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Suspense is fairly effective until it's stretched to the point of monotony.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For me the film creates more embarrassment than sympathy, but at least it's a kind of embarrassment that's instructive.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The tricky plot has an interesting payoff, but it's a slow and bumpy ride getting there, and Koepp fares better with special effects than with generating either suspense or interest in the characters.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Poorly acted, over-the-top, and generally out-of-control bloodbath.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Philip Kaufman's usual flair for erotic detail largely deserts him here, and this thriller seems most interested in lingering over battered and bloodied male faces.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Its paper-thin characters turned into caricatures by egregious hamming, this 1996 Japanese comedy-drama about shy ballroom dancers is sentimental goo and downright interminable.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The truth is that this programmatic Christian parable is pretty unbearable--glib, often myopic, and reeking with sentimentality and self-pity.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Another virtual-reality SF movie -- and you're not likely to care.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you're an 11-year-old boy at heart, this is undoubtedly even better than the pile of dinosaur shit in Jurassic Park.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This comedy is an ill-fated attempt to remake "Risky Business" (1983) for the 21st century, complete with a wind-chimey score, the hero posing in his underpants, and a cynical happy ending.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    May be amusing if you feel a pressing need to feel superior to somebody, but the aim is too broad and scattershot to add up to much beyond an acknowledgment of small-town desperation--something Sherwood Anderson and Sinclair Lewis did much better back in the 20s and 30s.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This movie feels like it was made by a bank rather than a person.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film itself regresses, starting in the present and winding up with a cautionary ending that evokes the hokiest SF movies of the 50s.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    With so many dubious elements at play, even the half-good ideas get lost in the shuffle.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film is far too appreciative of its own jokes to let the audience discover anything on its own.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Slapdash plot, paper-thin characters, misogynist undertones, and mechanical crosscutting are all soft-core standbys.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's an utter waste of Watts; there's not a trace here of the talent on display in Mulholland Drive, perhaps because the script doesn't bother to give her a character.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Insofar as one can distinguish the investigative research from the career move, this Sundance prizewinner is effective muckraking, but it lacks much of a political program apart from the message that we're poisoning ourselves.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It has its moments, but not many, and generally speaking it runs neck and neck with Dune as the least successful and least interesting Lynch feature.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Part of the idea here was to play in the ambiguous zones where Las Vegas tackiness, LSD hallucinations, Gilliam beasties, and lots of vomit become difficult to separate.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    More concerned with attitude than character and too moralistic to be much fun.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Frantic and unfunny.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The result is a dull and campy 97-minute bloodbath offering little distinction between good guys and bad.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Bored me for most of its 178 minutes and then infuriated me with its cheap cynicism once it belatedly became interesting--which may be a tribute to writer-director Lars von Trier's gifts as a provocateur.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An exceptionally stupid movie.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If Sayles had persuaded me he knew anything about Bush, his background, or his entourage that isn't already well-known, I might have felt more like laughing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Awkward storytelling and spotty exposition reduce it to a string of rude shocks--not even the eventual denouement provides a lucid enough account of where this is all coming from.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Payne is just as guilty of using her (Ruth) as a figurehead for his ideas--most of them about the stupidity and futility of politics--as are the targets of his satirical abuse.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Every effect is so calculated that only the conscious minds of filmmakers and viewers are engaged--and not by very much or for very long.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't doubt the noble motives behind this Disney parable, but the attempts at amiable, laid-back dialogue (script by Gerald DiPego) are painful, the pacing is sluggish, and the confused story's poorly focused.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Now that Robin Williams has been emasculated--dangerously schizoid comic turned into nice-guy movie star--it isn't too surprising that a commercial hack like Chris Columbus would use him the way he does in this cutesy 1993 comedy: cutting between Williams trying on different voices rather than holding the camera on him as he lurches between these voices without notice.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Translating Woolrich's pulpy obsessiveness and crazy contrivances into the stuff of light comedy is no easy matter, and the movie gets as far as it does mainly with the help of Lake and Shirley MacLaine.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    [An] unsatisfying mess.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As effective as MacDowell was in sex, lies, and videotape, she's clearly no match for the talented Depardieu; perhaps she'd seem less out of her depth if the script wasn't so implausible and threadbare.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Running beyond three hours, the movie more than overstays its welcome, and despite some vague genuflections in the general direction of The Godfather regarding family ties and revenge, there are simply too many years and locations covered, too many crane shots and rainstorms.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Misogynistic claptrap about a divorced husband (Dustin Hoffman) fighting for the custody of and learning to cope with his little boy (Justin Henry) - a movie whose classy trimmings (including Nestor Almendros's cinematography) persuaded audiences to regard writer-director Robert Benton as a subtle art-house director.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you can swallow one more amnesia plot and one more recycling of favorite bits from Godard's Bande a part, pressed to serve yet another postmodernist antithriller about redemption, this has its compensations.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    More of the same, though a lot coarser than its immediate predecessor, and the characters and situations have now calcified to the point where they're simply sitcom staples.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There are no characters to care about or remember afterward - just a lot of flashy technique involving decor, some glib allegorical flourishes, and the obligatory studied film-school weirdness.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The movie offers an insulting "let them eat cake" gesture toward the 1982 audience, but the pacing is so ragged and the characters so lifeless that few will be able to stay awake long enough to feel offended
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Essentially a one-trick pony.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At first I thought this was a Michael Haneke knockoff, but it's more depressing and less edifying than most of those narrative experiments, which is why I eventually tuned it out.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The plot of this character-driven drama is slender and the digital images rather muddy--apparently an impoverished indie feature can look bad and still not be very interesting--but to his credit, Thelemaque sticks to his minimalist turf. And the dogs are great.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tsai's obvious disgust at the sex is part of what makes the film so unpleasant; he remains a brilliant original, but this is a parody of his gifts.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is thoughtful nihilist provocation at best.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The indifference of the proceedings and the hero's slapstick behavior to the everyday realities of the camps borders on the nauseating.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This stupidly contrived thriller is all the more disappointing if you admire previous work by Berry and director James Foley (After Dark, My Sweet).
    • 18 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    About eight minutes of this comedy is devoted to some terrific breakdancing; the rest consists of wall-to-wall product placement and politically incorrect bad-taste comedy.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The unfunniest comedy I can recall seeing in ages.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The whole thing becomes a very rickety and contrived tearjerker.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A major washout.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's so little urgency to the plot that one eventually feels not even the actors and filmmakers believe for a second in what's going on.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    But it's also Howard's and his audience's misfortune that a good time can be had by all only if nothing of substance gets said.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Almost no plot here and even less character--just a lot of pretexts for S-M imagery, Catholic decor, gobs of gore, and the usual designer schizophrenia.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I had a pretty good time with this until the end, when I felt so soiled by the filmmakers' cynicism and the characters' gratuitous viciousness that I wanted to take a bath.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Moving in fits and starts, mawkish in its sincerity, and at times disjointed in its lumpy structure.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    When nostalgia, hypocrisy, and indifference to history converge in the kind of shameless Capracorn manufactured here, one can either be stupefied by the filmmakers' cynicism or fall for the package hook, line, and sinker.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A geek festival that mainly invites us to hoot at a bunch of alleged crazies.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The gratuitous use of the city (New Orleans) during Mardi Gras is the least of this movie's unoriginal sins.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The film's a swell way of torturing yourself for 108 minutes.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Despite the cast -- Kevin Bacon, Matt Dillon, Neve Campbell, Denise Richards, Daphne Rubin-Vega, Theresa Russell, Robert Wagner, and Bill Murray -- I found it preposterous.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    None of the characters or ideas is allowed to develop beyond its cardboard profile.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I only laughed once here, at a Treat Williams reaction shot; the rest of the time I was trying to figure out why Allen made this movie.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Offers the same crudely effective variation on the hatred and fear of hillbillies in "Deliverance."
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A stiff. I don't know the comic book series, but it could hardly be as lifeless as this leaden adaptation, in which the weapons have more personality than the characters and the nonstop action often feels like no action at all.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Alas, the plot eventually takes over, and it's exceptionally ugly and unpleasant.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An extravagant mess.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    After making their two best features to date, "Fargo" and "The Big Lebowski," the Coen brothers have surely come up with their worst.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Maybe writers Josann McGibbon and Sara Parriott were thinking of Tracy and Hepburn--assuming they were thinking of anything--but not even Roberts's smile can put this one over.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Costner has an uncanny aptitude for gravitating toward the dopiest projects in sight, but this time he's outdone himself.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At first I thought I was watching yet another version of "A Christmas Carol"; then I wondered if it was a remake of "It's a Wonderful Life"; finally I gave up trying to find anything at all in it that was unfamiliar.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Offers so much frenetic fast cutting to so little purpose that it becomes an ordeal.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's not terribly interesting on the subject.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Imagine combining bad imitations of the "Ace Ventura" and "Austin Powers" movies and you'll have a rough idea of this feeble Dana Carvey farce.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Overwritten by Billy Crystal and Peter Tolan, overdirected by Joe Roth, overplayed by most of the cast, yet typically undernourished.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    For most of the running time I was mainly confused, as well as mildly nauseated by the gross-out details of a tale that tends to be more slimy than scary.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's clear that writer Akiva Goldsman and director Joel Schumacher are bereft of ideas and using the MTV clutter as a cover-up.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Mechanical, soulless.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    At least (John) Waters cares about most of his freaks; for Lynch they're basically exploitation fodder for a puritanical "dark vision of the universe" that seems to come straight out of junior high, complete with giggles.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Seems more theatrical than cinematic, needing the kind of direct address that only a stage can provide.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I can think of only one bit of Tin Cup that's beautiful, imaginative, and different, and it lasts for only a few seconds: a speech delivered by Russo, before her character is transformed into the standard-issue cheerleader, is broken into fragments by jump cuts.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    David Morse, who plays the driver, gives a relatively sharp and understated performance -- for me the only bearable thing in the movie.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't know the novel, but judging from the script by Crichton and John Patrick Shanley, this must be scraping the bottom of the Crichton barrel.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The most obnoxious case of masculine swagger since Andrew Dice Clay, with just a tad of Paul Lynde thrown in for spice, Jim Carrey defies you not to bolt for the exit while playing the title hero in this 1994 comic mystery.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Given the audacity, it would be a pleasure to report that the results are hilarious, but most of it isn't even funny, and the sense of "anything goes" hangs heavy over the film as it develops.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An epic about the Irish patriot (Liam Neeson) during the last years of his life (1916-'22), it clearly represents a lot of thought on Jordan's part, yet it's dramatic and cinematic sludge.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A festival favorite in 1992, this flamboyant Australian crowd pleaser and first feature by Baz Luhrmann ("Moulin Rouge") struck me then as one of the more horrific and unpleasant movies I'd seen in quite some time.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nearly all the SF premises are accorded the status of Andrew Dice Clay one-liners - which means that they, along with the characters, keep changing from one scene to the next.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    JFK
    Stone's all-purpose conspiracy theory, built like a house of cards, rivals "Mississippi Burning" in its sheer crudeness and contempt for the audience.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Full of odd notions and interludes, the movie never really comes together, but fitfully suggests a cross between Boys Town and Greaser's Palace.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The glorification of the FBI, the obfuscation about Jim Crow laws, and the absurd melodramatics may all have been well-intentioned, but the understanding about the past and the present of racism that emerges is depressingly thin.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The plot exposition gets laborious in spots, the period flavor is only occasional and approximate, and the direction tends to be clunky, yet the strong secondary cast helps to take up some of the slack.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Big
    Once again, the overall premise is milked for some mild titillation involving the hero's sexual innocence, making one wonder if the genre's popularity might involve some deeply sublimated form of kiddie porn--arguably the distilled ideological essence of squeaky-clean Reaganism.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is gold-plated navel gazing in the worst 60s style.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tacky in the extreme, this self-congratulatory 1988 film is an exercise in hypocrisy, indulging every form of Christmas exploitation that it pretends to attack, and many of the laughs are forced.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If your idea of a good time is watching a lot of stupid, unpleasant people insult and brutalize one another, this is right up your alley.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An exceptionally feeble entry whose ideas, visual and otherwise, consist of hand-me-downs from 2001, Star Wars, Blade Runner, and Superman III, and whose special effects, despite the hefty budget, look strictly bargain basement.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Tautly directed by David Slade, this drama probably offers more sadism than anyone could possibly want...The characters are absurd, but if you're up for this sort of thing, then surely you can con yourself into accepting them. Personally, I'd rather have this movie obliterated from my memory.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Painfully unfunny comedy.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Enter this diseased Lewis Carroll universe at your own risk.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This 2005 feature offered me my first taste of Guy Ritchie's macho-centric artiness, and I hope it's my last.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I don't know if Rob Reiner is the one to blame for this atrocity, but he directed and coproduced.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not wishing to spoil the fun -- pretty hard to come by anyway in this 1998 blockbuster's 150 minutes -- I won't tell you the outcome, but I'll wager you can guess.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    X
    It bored me clean out of my wits.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Misguided version of one of the Bard's best comedies.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you want to waste a couple of hours, you can surely do much better looking elsewhere.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What emerges is oddly ineffectual and uninvolving.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An extravagant waste of resources.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Vacuous filmmaking of a very familiar kind.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Sitting through this barrage of all-purpose insults aimed at obvious targets was an unenlightening chore.
    • 11 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The recut American version is truly awful, but a good 75 percent of the awfulness is attributable to Miramax, the film's distributor.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Not even D.W. Griffith, Steven Spielberg, and Stanley Kubrick working together could succeed in making this pandering piece of nonsense work dramatically on any level except the most egregiously phony.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The talentless but irrepressibly trendy Luc Besson ("Subway," "The Big Blue") dreamed up this idiotic story that seems vaguely inspired by Kubrick's (not Anthony Burgess's) "A Clockwork Orange."
    • 36 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Misshapen and obfuscating biopic.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I didn't laugh once.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Another piece of phony uplift from producer Jerry Bruckheimer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This runs a close second to September as his worst feature to date--marginally more bearable only because it's a comedy and a couple of gags are reasonably funny.
    • 6 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The hokey dialogue and witless physical gags keep everything painful and hectoring.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A lot of uninteresting and unpleasant people torture, abuse, and fire guns at a lot of other uninteresting and unpleasant people, in a repulsive, interminable would-be crime thriller.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If I were a Christian, I'd be appalled to have this primitive and pornographic bloodbath presume to speak for me.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    "Speed" made millions on mindless, empty thrills; this laborious sequel is just as mindless and empty but lacks the thrills.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    All this is supposed to be as cute as bugs and chock-full of worldly wisdom, but even with lead actors as likable and as resourceful as these, the material made me alternately want to gag and nod off.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    With a shamelessly cliched script by Amy Holden Jones (based on a novel by Jack Engelhard) that includes a speech plagiarized from Citizen Kane, the results are only for those who can take fare like "Valley of the Dolls" with a straight face and want to see Redford play Jay Gatsby again.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The writing and directing of Jonathan Darby, a British TV veteran and Hollywood executive, make the proceedings neither believable nor compelling, so what might have been another "Rosemary's Baby" isn't even a halfway decent genre exercise.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Holly Hunter and Sigourney Weaver, a cop and a shrink, are the main trackers, but so little is done in Ann Biderman and David Madsen's script to give them or their colleagues or even their prey interesting human dimensions that the overall ambience is chiefly pornographic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    An offensive premise and a pathetic, almost pleading desire to outrage our sensibilities with it.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    What seems more problematic is the virtual exaltation of Dirty Harry vigilantism, the storm trooper mentality and behavior on Nolte's part that the film breezily takes for granted; if there's any irony about it, it's carefully designed to wash over the storm trooper types in the audience and not give offense to them--only to the rest of us.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 10 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It's especially doomed by a strained script that recalls certain bottom-of-the-barrel Bob Hope vehicles of the 50s in its attempts to be brittle and self-mocking in its humor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is a new form of obscenity that might be called suicide porn. It's not just the voyeuristic surveillance that's obscene, but the use of suicide footage as counterpoint to other stories as they're told. Steel shows no special insight into the subject, though even that couldn't justify such hideousness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A piece of mythmaking stupidity.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This atrocious comedy doesn't have an idea in its head but still screams at the top of its lungs.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    It was like a Farrelly brothers gross-out without the laughs.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The ethnic humor that gave May's movie its charge is replaced by crass mean-spiritedness. If I were in movie hell, I'd rather see "Good Luck Chuck" again than return to this atrocity.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Formulaic sass machine... I was writhing in my seat.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Van Sant's doomed and misguided experiment.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Angry, fitfully provocative mess.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Insulting to audience and cast alike.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The cynicism of the writer and director smacks of such self-hatred (fully acknowledged in the film's closing shot) that their disgust spills over onto all their characters (and their audience too), and inasmuch as everybody here is one kind of whore or another at virtually every moment, the fine moral distinctions this movie insists on making sometimes seem about as arcane and as loony as medieval theology about angels dancing on the heads of pins.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you haven't lived until you've seen Laurence Fishburne and Sam Neill duke it out in a vat full of red paint, here's your chance; personally, my idea of hell would be having to see this stinker again.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    In what I saw, Madonna in the title role tries bravely not to buckle under the weight of Stone and Parker's sense of Stalinist monumentality and fails honorably, while the Lloyd Webber music goes on being nonmusical.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Considering the 32 writers (including Tom S. Parker, Jim Jennewein, and Steven E. de Souza) who worked on this live-action adaptation of the 60s Hanna-Barbera cartoon series about a Stone Age family, one might have expected a few funny lines here and there, but this is mirthless (and worthless) from top to bottom.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    If you haven't lived until you've heard Geena Davis say "Suck my dick," New Line probably deserves your money.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 0 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Very, very stupid.