Jonathan Storm
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For 353 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Storm's Scores

Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Boardwalk Empire: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Inconceivable: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 84 out of 353
353 tv reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    Scoundrels, at 9 p.m., and The Gates, at 10, may not be exactly the stuff you can't wait another week for, but both are watchable and fun, part of a big ABC effort to put something new, if not original, on the air most nights this summer.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    "Cool," says he, as, most likely, will all sorts of viewers from 12 to 92 who are looking for a pleasant way to pass a late-evening hour at the end of a summer weekend.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    Scoundrels, at 9 p.m., and The Gates, at 10, may not be exactly the stuff you can't wait another week for, but both are watchable and fun, part of a big ABC effort to put something new, if not original, on the air most nights this summer.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    It can be obvious, sometime a little plodding, but its heart is bigger than all of Lux, and it's the kind of show parents and kids can watch together without anybody saying, "Ewww."; With the name Life Unexpected, it actually is an unexpected pleasure.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    Los Angeles probably has more interesting locations than New York, and it certainly has its share of interesting crimes, so there's plenty of fodder for LOLA. It's literally warmed-over Law & Order, but that doesn't mean it's unappealing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    You might remember that because Nikita is aimed directly at 24 fans. Not as ambitious nor as entertaining, it is just as decidedly unbelievable yet diverting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    Absent the bizarre, centuries-old conspiracy plot, this show looks a lot like Alias, and it should, since that show's daddy, savvy J.J. Abrams, works behind the scenes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    There's some minor Rashomon-style point-of-view switching as the attorneys prepare their opposing cases each week, and never know who's going to win, which makes this a bit different, and a bit more intriguing, than many standard lawyer shows.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    It's much sweeter and funnier than it sounds.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    NYPD Blue's James McDaniel joins Imperioli and a fine cast, including the City of Detroit itself, in this show that tries to imbue a Cops-like documentary feel to its action, all shot on location.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    Careful viewing reveals that American customs bear the brunt of most of the gentle humor of this series that should fit seamlessly into NBC's goofballs-at-the-office (or in-the-classroom) Thursday-night sitcom block.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    The plots feature lots of creative legal give-and-take to keep the audience amused and guessing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    The show would be better if it got a little closer to the ground, but Wilde, with unusually beautiful production values (for a sitcom), completes a one-hour, laugh track-free, absurdist block that gives Fox its best chance at comedy success since The Bernie Mac Show and Malcolm in the Middle.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    You can probably tell this is not your average sitcom. What you probably can't sense is a surprising tenderness and gentle humor (along with the crass) in this family, living on the socio-economic fringes in the house of Jimmy's grandma, so dotty she rarely wears enough clothes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    Because it's such recent history, there are few revelations in a frequently flat assemblage of interviews and highlights, with Wednesday's installment, featuring some of the greatest postseason flops and comebacks of all time, the more appealing of the two.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    The postproduction excesses may sometimes distract from the series' wonder, which, if not quite up to Discovery's Planet Earth (2007) and Life (2010), is still jaw-dropping.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    It may not be The Shield (what is?), and it isn't up to the standard of TV's other corruption-in-Chicago show, The Good Wife, currently the best drama on network TV. But after you get by the initial S.O.S. of the first episode, The Chicago Code may be better than the other police commissioner show, and at least as worthy to add to your weekly TV appointment lineup.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    Mr. Sunshine looks promising, with former Friend Matthew Perry playing straight man in a swirl of kooks, including an especially amusing Allison Janney, who deliver consistent laughs.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    All five characters, in fact, transcend the cheap stereotypes that lazy writers so frequently use to populate their sitcoms. That may not be enough to propel their show into the long green of syndication, but for a Fox sitcom, even cautious optimism is a step in the right direction.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    It might have benefited from the subtler writing touch of Anderson, who was a prolific writer for stage (Anne of the Thousand Days, for instance) and screen, specializing in long-ago history, but it's still good fun on a big level.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    The story is as predictable as the sunrise, but somehow, instead of distracting from the film's enjoyment, that adds to it. As the world spins faster and more coarsely every day, it's a quiet pleasure to watch an old-fashioned production in which virtue, charity, and hard work are rewarded.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    It's hard to find one that's not more entertaining than watching one of your winter favorites the second time around. Picking three or four regulars to go with summer's more esoteric fare, which includes Breaking Bad, The Big C, Curb Your Enthusiasm, and some others, makes an excellent TV strategy. The Protector deserves a slot in the rotation.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    The show has some hilarious moments and perks along between them as you might expect a Drescher show to. It's a fine and frothy companion to the big show on TV Land (is that an oxymoron?) at 10 p.m. Wednesday, the Betty White-starrer Hot in Cleveland.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    The helpers seem compassionate, and Ferguson's story is so fascinating that her "journey" makes for good reality television.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    It's crude and hilarious and clearly aimed at a young male audience.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    There are no twins, reality stars, or vampires, er, witches, but you're not alone in thinking that's the most preposterous concept of all. Surprisingly, cast and crew succeed in making the sugary sweet illogic palatable, if not a gourmet delight.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    A Gifted Man is solid enough, in fact, to make you forget it's a ghost story.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    Ringer is no Buffy, so that's enough of that. It is a cleverly constructed take on the old concept of the evil twin, a soap opera staple that dates back more than a thousand years through movies, books, and poetry.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Storm
    A sunny and often funny mix of "Twin Peaks," "Law & Order," and "Flipper." [4 Aug 1998, p.D01]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Storm
    Kindness is the true beauty of Will & Grace, and it may be that kindness, in the midst of so much of the mean-spirited, demeaning stuff that passes for comedy on TV, will carry the day. [21 Sep 1998]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer