Jordan Mintzer

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For 186 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jordan Mintzer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Blue Is the Warmest Color
Lowest review score: 20 Colonia
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 8 out of 186
186 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s like watching a first-rate standup routine transformed into fiction, or in this case auto-fiction, as Rock has more on his mind than just making us laugh, offering up a witty celebrity satire that doubles as a love story set during one long and eventful New York City day.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s a surprising and often thought-provoking effort from a filmmaker who has never chosen to take the simple path, confirming Larrain as one of the more genuine talents working in cinema today.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Jordan Mintzer
    Less concerned with classic storytelling than with creating virtual performance pieces on screen, the film features dozens of extended sequences of Adele and Emma both in and out of bed—scenes that are virtuously acted and directed, even if they run on for longer than most filmmakers would allow.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Jordan Mintzer
    Both a powerful allegory for post-war regeneration and a rich Hitchcockian tale of mistaken identity, Phoenix once again proves that German filmmaker Christian Petzold and his favorite star, Nina Hoss, are clearly one of the best director-actor duos working in movies today.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s all quite perverse for sure, which of course is no surprise coming from either the actress or the director, though what’s welcome about Elle is the way they combine their talents to make a film that hardly skimps on the sex, violence and sadism, yet ultimately tells a story about how one woman uses them all to set herself free.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Jordan Mintzer
    Bi’s film is ultimately akin to the early image we see of Wildcat’s body being wheeled on a mine cart and pushed gently into the abyss, taking us on a slow and steady rollercoaster ride through memory, melancholy and movie magic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Jordan Mintzer
    The issues come clashing together in an explosive package that, despite some snafus, remains fairly riveting to the end.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jordan Mintzer
    Directed with wit and structural precision — there is not a single moment in the film that feels wasted or doesn’t pay off later on — Glory uses two vastly opposing characters (a communications specialist vs. someone who can barely communicate at all) to depict a society riddled with fraud and cruelty.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jordan Mintzer
    By keeping the camera focused on the faces of patients and judges alike, Depardon — working again with sound recordist and producer Claudine Nougaret — reveals shreds of humanity, and even moments of hilarity, in these closed-door sessions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jordan Mintzer
    Raw
    It’s rare to see such confidence in a first feature, yet Ducournau seems to know where she’s going at all times, keeping the narrative lean and mean while utilizing an array of stylistic techniques – slow-motion, sequence shots and tons of on-screen prosthetics – that never let up until the witty, and inevitably grisly, final scene.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Jordan Mintzer
    Director Laurent Becue-Renard’s engrossing study of soldiers coping with trauma through intensive group therapy offers a rare look at real men shaken by real experiences, underlining the monumental courage it takes for them to get their lives back on track.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jordan Mintzer
    This terrifically performed piece of filmed theater is filled with twists, turns and underhanded schemes that show how history sometimes lies in the hands of a selected few, not to mention a good glass of Chardonnay.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Featuring sharp performances from Marina Fois (Polisse) and promising newcomer Matthieu Lucci, the film shows Cantet returning to form...with a story that pursues the themes of his best work while underscoring some of the issues currently facing his homeland.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    If the movie runs long in places, the vibrant performances from Worthy and the rest of the cast help push things ahead to the grand finale, and there are enough dynamo battles from start to finish to keep hungry rap fans satisfied.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    The film is a textured portrait of human beings and the jobs they do, offering scant commentary but much to chew on, not to mention plenty of laughs -- no small feat in a movie dedicated to something as dry sounding as “public radio.”
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Working with a terrific cast — first-timer Nero is a real discovery — Muylaert makes all the traumatic twists in the story feel both natural and almost casual at times, as if we’re watching everyday people whose lives have suddenly been transformed into a telenovela plot.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    In Porumboiu’s movies, what you see is never what you get, and there are riches to be had if you just keep looking.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Past lives and ancient ancestors are evoked through conversations that are both cryptic and oddly matter-of-fact, in a work that has the realistic vibe of a documentary but the unearthly qualities of a sustained reverie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    While this may be the actor-director’s most polished feature yet, it’s far from a traditional suspense movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Where director Yamada excels is in depicting the interior worlds of the two main characters, paying particular attention to details, whether visual or sonic, that seem to place a constant divide between Shoya and Shoko.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s a simple, somewhat mundane scenario that, in the hands of a terrific cast and two talented filmmakers, is transformed into a minor Greek comic-tragedy, with one fearless woman trying to stave off loved ones who smother her with guilt and affection.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Like other recent French cartoons — ranging from Persopolis to the Kirikou series — this one manages to maintain something personal within a broadly appealing framework: it doesn’t shy away from the dark side of life, and in the end, even allows us to enjoy it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    There are a few standout scenes in War's closing reels, as well as a few cleverly executed twists, yet Erlingsson doesn't let them undercut the movie's emotional sway.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    This endearing old-age drama works best as an earnest and colorful character study, even if it doesn't really break any new cinematic ground.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Tavernier focuses on a dozen or so major and minor auteurs, showcasing their artistry in hundreds of film clips that he comments on with historical insight and aesthetic precision.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Kahn never offers an easy way out for Thomas, even if the finale tends to wrap things up in ways that seem a little too conclusive. But his film mostly explores, with steadfastness and moments of raw emotion, the crude uphill battle faced by junkies on the path to recovery.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Reteaming to play a duo similar to the one in A Prophet, Rahim and Arestrup maintain the film’s tense and sinister tone – the former providing a convincing mix of fragility and machismo, and the latter looking and acting more and more like Brando in the latter half of his career.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    If the film runs a tad too long, especially in its second half, Embrace of the Serpent is still an absorbing account of indigenous tribes facing up to colonial incursions, revealing how Westerners are in many ways far behind the native peoples they conquer.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    The film’s shrewd sense of humor, its way of underlining the absurdity of life’s foibles, is fully carried by Huppert’s disarming performance, which never panders to easy sentiments but doesn’t shy away from showcasing raw emotion.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    The film slowly but surely works its charms, painting a rich, emotionally complex portrait of a woman who, like Denis herself, will not let herself be boxed in.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    This impressionistic chronicle of the war is, at first, more concerned with household chores and family matters than it is with soldiers on the battlefield, but its harrowing third act reveals what can happen when civilians become targets as well.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    The drama feels a bit leisurely and distant at times, and the film runs a little long, yet it intelligently and assuredly explores how longstanding traditions can be gradually upended by drugs, money and outside influences.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Composed of broad, colorful brushstrokes and minimalist figuration, this seldom-told story can be a bit slow on the plot side but makes up for it with exquisite artistry and a welcome sense of gloom.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    [Aubrey Plaza] adds something different to Hartley’s usual hijinks, making for a crime dramedy that’s ostensibly quirky, but also short, sweet and quite moving.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Combining the glamour of "To Catch a Thief" with the ruckus of a Ben Stiller movie, TV vet Pascal Chaumeil's French Riviera-set intrigue stars Romain Duris.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Lapid’s approach is so cautious yet so ambitious, he manages to weave an engrossing narrative that -- despite some longueurs after the one-hour mark -- grows progressively intense.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Similar in form to the director’s previous nonfiction studies (Our Daily Bread, Over the Years), this wordless assemblage of fixed shots is as much a museum piece as it is a strictly art-house item, inviting viewers to sit back and let the imagery consume them.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    The picture is marked by superb performances and a dazzling technical display by the helmer and praiseworthy cinematographer Eric Gautier.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    By focusing his camera on those “half-men, completely broken” by Habre’s reign and allowing them to tell their stories, Haroun is helping his country to finally mourn its own tragedy, while his warm and understanding approach offers up what feels like a path toward appeasement.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Knife hits you from its very first frame — and this is really a frame of celluloid and not a file of gigabytes — as a work engulfed in the pleasures of filmmaking's past.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Writer-director Rachel Lang and star Salome Richard manage to craft an intriguing feature debut filled with keen observations and slices of dark humor.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Toback does a great job introducing the non-initiated to the sticky job of getting a film funded outside the studio system.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    With an acute style marked by lengthy tracking shots and crisp natural cinematography from Laurent Desmet (Shall We Kiss?), Leonor manages to convey emotions through purely visual terms.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    It proves that Beauvois still masters his uniquely classical brand of filmmaking, coaxing strong performances out of veteran Nathalie Baye and newbie Iris Bry, who makes an impressive screen debut.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    Stranger by the Lake invites you into its alluring and peaceful world, only to gradually uncover the darkness beneath it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    A riveting and often hilarious demonstration of the Slovenian philosopher’s uncanny ability to turn movies inside out and accepted notions on their head.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jordan Mintzer
    While things get a tad buckled town in mayhem and special effects throughout the film’s busy final reels, Wright spends enough time sketching out his mischievous middle-aged men so that their journey...feels worthwhile and even meaningful for a few of them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    McKenzie deserves credit for revealing such a troubling facet of her homeland, and even if the shallow focus — both literal and figurative — of her movie can be frustrating at times, she bravely never turns away.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s a tricky proposition that will surely ruffle the feathers of many viewers, but one that also makes a curious, if lasting, impression, thanks in part to strong turns from actors Anais Demoustier and Josh Charles.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s a rather fascinating bit of artistic self-indulgence that’s both made by, and about, self-indulgent men, although one that can certainly grow taxing. [Unrated Version]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    A delightfully old-fashioned kid’s flick with a meaningful message.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s Kateb -- a rising star with three films in Cannes this year -- who steals the show, portraying a man whose professionalism and humanity are constantly thwarted by the other staff members, especially the Gallic natives that don't have to jump through the same hoops he does.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    There’s a carefree spirit about everything that happens, including all the talk about girls and masturbation, that makes the story as breezy as the summer air,
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    DP Eric Dumont captures the action as if he were shooting events as they unfold in real time. Along with the supporting nonpro cast and all the news footage, this makes At War feel much closer to documentary than fiction — and the movie itself less like a workplace drama than the chronicle of a soldier in the heat of battle.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Acevedo deserves credit for crafting something so audacious – along with the photography, the sound design by Felipe Rayo is also boldly conceived – though there are moments when the style really dominates the subject matter, in a film that’s a pleasure to watch but not always one to follow.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    It's a certified B-movie without superheroes or interplanetary travel, drawing its power from a whodunit, race-against-the-clock scenario that plays as if The Lady Vanishes and Strangers on a Train were chopped up and tossed into the blender along with a slab of CGI and a full bottle of Dexedrine.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Highlighted by an all-consuming lead performance from Lindon – surrounded here by an excellent cast of non-pros – this third collaboration strays further into Dardennes Bros. territory than previous efforts, although its depiction of an Average Joe scraping by in contemporary France features its own unique voice.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s definitely treacly in places and not exactly reinventing the wheel, but the two fine performances at its heart are more than worth it.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    National Gallery feels closer to a pure aesthetic investigation than an organizational exposé, and in that respect is reminiscent of recent Paris-set films like Crazy Horse or La Danse, mostly allowing the art to speak for itself.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Both evocative and faithful in its depiction of the famed French singer's lascivious life, "Gainsbourg (vie heroique)" offers up a feast of memorable chansons and an almost endless parade of drop-dead-gorgeous muses.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Despite what sounds, and sometimes plays out, like a working-class soap opera, Pagnol’s genius is evident in the way emotions are often distilled through the characters’ winsome Southern attitudes, creating an atmosphere infused with playful humor, innate wit and an endless flow of alcohol.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Despite an initial forecast of smart laughs and witty tete-a-tetes, the French dramedy Let It Rain winds up being a partly cloudy affair that lacks the cohesiveness of Agnes Jaoui’s two previous features, "The Taste of Others" and "Look at Me."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s a unique take on what could otherwise be a morbidly depressing tale of loss and grief, dishing out tons of energy and spats of devilish humor, though not always fitting its numerous parts into a succinct whole.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Sussman ultimately portrays Hayes as a man with a good heart who did not necessarily realize how his own story would wreak collateral damage upon an entire people, while the filmmakers — especially Parker — are shown to be less remorseful about the whole experience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Using a wide-ranging color palette that shifts from the warmer hues of the Sahara desert to the colder, sadder blues and grays of old-time Paris, Lie and his team provide a pared-down animation technique that recalls classic Disney, albeit with a rougher, at times abstract touch.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    What makes the movie work are the lively performances, both from the supporting cast and from Cranston, who sheds the mimicry and pontificating of earlier scenes to turn Trumbo into a wry, self-deprecating and somewhat cheeky older man, even if he continued to stand up for what was right.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    The film is not always subtle in its portrayal of a family ripped apart by tragedy, but remains captivating as a pure procedural that raises questions about the Paris police's handling of such situations, as well as about the state of race relations in contemporary France.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s an if-it-ain’t-broke-then-don’t-fix-it approach that works just fine if you’re simply looking to take another ride on the rollercoaster.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Filled with strong performances and numerous twists that keep the tension high, even if the plot gets tied up a tad too neatly.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Even if the air fizzles out a bit during the denouement, the film still accomplishes what it set out to do, with both Kahn and Bejo aptly shouldering all the narrative weight until the final scene.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    French feel-good filmmaking to the max. Yet a heaping pile of cliches doesn't prevent this touchingly simplistic tale -- from exuding a strong and universal emotional appeal.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Writer-director Xavier Giannoli offers up an amusingly entertaining portrait of fortune, infamy and severe melodic dysfunction in the polished French period dramedy, Marguerite.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Picture initially suggests a sort of Gallic "Damages," with Kristin Scott Thomas and Ludivine Sagnier in the Glenn Close and Rose Byrne roles, but the corporate catfight soon gives way to a cleverly designed whodunit.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Barbet Schroeder offers up a touching look at unrequited love and neglected memory with the simpatico two-hander, Amnesia.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    The fact that the director once again displays a true mastery of his craft, from Deffontaines’ exquisite framing to the decision to record all the songs live rather than having them lip-synched (apparently one of the only times this has been done since Straub-Huillet’s 1975 movie Moses and Aron), makes for a transfixing, if sometimes excruciating, cinematic experience.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    With such well-tuned performances and scattered intensity, it's unfortunate that the technical aspects of the film are not always up to par.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    An aesthetically arresting hit man story that gets by more on its craftsmanship than on its minimalist, borderline ham-fisted narrative, Salvo nonetheless marks an impressive feature debut from Italian writing-directing duo Fabio Grassadonia and Antonio Piazza.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    There are definitely more worthy endeavors than circling the globe in search of the perfect cut of meat, but French producer-director Franck Ribiere nonetheless delivers an absorbing, and often enlightening, quest for the world’s greatest sirloin in his exhaustive food documentary, Steak (R)evolution.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s a must-see for anyone interested in the mind of a major auteur, even if Thomsen tends to favor psychology over cinema.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    The sadistic horror comedy Safe Neighborhood is the kind of film that’s tough to categorize but easy to enjoy, especially if you like watching teenagers do some very twisted things for the holiday season.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    With her sophomore effort, Evolution, the writer-director delivers another disturbing mélange of experimental genre filmmaking and adorable, tortured French kids, offering up a trippy visual feast that satisfies on an aesthetic level, if not always on a narrative one.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Like his erratic protagonist, Gilroy doesn’t always know when to settle down or call it quits, and the film’s constant shifts of tone can grow tiring, even if the action as a whole never gets boring.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    The painstaking work done by Kobiela and Welchman to turn some of the artist’s most prized canvases into animated scenes can be impressive to behold.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    National Bird hardly offers any counterpoint to the arguments presented, nor does it attempt to show how drones could possibly save the lives of U.S. soldiers either on the ground or in the air. But it does reveal a program whose international reach and seemingly limitless surveillance powers are extraordinarily difficult to keep in check.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Adapting their highly successful stage version to the screen with keen comic-timing but much less cinematic panache, Mathieu Delaporte and Alexandre de la Patelliere offer up a lively take on love, friendship and baby-naming.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    An episodic coming-of-age story whose plot holes are paved over by strong performances and a few emotional highlights.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    England steers his talented young cast in the right direction despite some snafus in his story, and the fine acting is what ultimately brings 1:54 to the finish line.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    While the plot can sometimes feel too lightweight for feature length, with a score by composer Laurent Perez del Mar (Now or Never) that tends to overdo it on the gushy side, The Red Turtle benefits from the beautiful animation work of Dudok de Wit and his team.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    As a portrait of French youth ridden by angst and anger toward the powers that be...Nocturama makes an intriguingly cinematic case for showing over telling. But as a depiction of how, and why, terrorists (or anarchists or whatever they are) can take down a city, it falls apart in the face of what happens in the real world.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Canet manages to deliver a fresh celeb satire here that doesn’t shy away from the uglier side of star power, with “uglier” taking on various meanings as the script (co-written with Philippe Lefebvre and Rodolphe Lauga) heads to some outré places in the last act.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    It’s hard not to be both moved and slightly blown away by the plight of these birds.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    What really helps Mountain overcome its far-fetched scenario is the pairing of Winslet and Elba, who know how to turn up the charm tenfold yet make Alex and Ben seem (mostly) like real people.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Black and White never panders too easily to sentiments, creating characters who are riddled with flaws but likeable all the same.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    As pure entertainment it certainly does the job, although much of the text's existential weight is lost in the process.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    A classically helmed biopic that brings nothing new to the genre, but benefits from handsome craftmanship and solid performances by Tobey Maguire as the Brooklyn boy wonder, and Liev Schreiber as his longtime Russian nemesis, Boris Spassky.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Juliette Binoche’s portrayal of the ill-fated artist is a study of restraint peppered with brief outbursts of emotion -- a riveting performance in an imposing, at times off-putting micro-biopic.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Like many science-fiction films, Star slowly but surely reveals itself as a parable of our self-destructive times – an artsy Interstellar with a threadbare narrative rather than one that’s forever running on hyperdrive.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Doyle overstuffs some of the content, jumping through dozens of interviews without allowing us enough time to process them. Still, the director and editor John Murphy manage to give all the material a solid through-line, making the many voices echo into one underlying argument: Showrunning sucks, but it may be the greatest job in entertainment today.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Unlike John Boorman's trippy 1967 L.A. noir of the same title, frenetic Gallic suspenser Point Blank provides few existential thrills but plenty of heart-racing action as it follows one man's marathon dash to save his kidnapped wife from execution.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jordan Mintzer
    Moussaoui captures the drama with a simple style that can seem a bit lackluster at times, although he makes good use of the Algerian locations and coaxes compelling performances from his cast. In the end, his narrative's three-pronged structure is perhaps the film's strongest asset.

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