Joshua Rothkopf

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For 899 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Marley
Lowest review score: 20 Winter's Tale
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 899
899 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie lacks the visual snap that would push the humor into next-level American satire. Still, you can’t help but laugh at scenes that could be mini-cartoons in themselves.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    What you will find is a film that toggles between impressive fury and a kind of made-for-TV blandness that does Nat Turner’s 1831 uprising — still controversial — no favors.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    An unabashed piece of political activism arriving three weeks before the election.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    As a piece of gore, Train to Busan takes the swiftest path from A to Z.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Rules Don’t Apply flies along at an inhuman speed; the edits are sharp, skipping years at a time, and the production values are unshowy. Like everything this star-director has done, the film is deceptively smart. It’s just a little too late to the game.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film aims for the stars but might have gone stratospheric if it cooled its jets ever so slightly.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Tonally, it’s a touch awkward (like the movie as a whole), but Larraín’s endgame set on a snowy mountainside is as abstract as the final moments of "The Shining" — a film that’s also about the life of the mind.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Wilson’s play, about dreams deferred and a son seeking approbation (The Leftovers’ Jovan Adepo), could have used a more cinematic rethink. But even flatly presented, it has a richness of rage that’s unmistakable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It feels too flabby for the company it keeps.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Split trots out many of Shyamalan’s pet moves (it’s amazing how well we know this filmmaker), including his tendency to infuse genre nonsense with the deeper trauma of child abuse.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    There’s no denying the movie’s climactic gathering of females bent on saving the species.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Alas, this is a film that builds to a backroom compromise on carbon emissions, not the most thrilling of dramatic structures. The serious issue of global warming won’t be minimized by a mediocre documentary, but it has yet to find a filmmaker inflamed with rage and visual passion.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    A horror film with the power to put a rascally grin on the face of that great genre subverter John Carpenter (They Live), Get Out has more fun playing with half-buried racial tensions than with scaring us to death.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    For all its updated bluster, this update still can’t escape the shadow of 1933’s magical King Kong.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    As Holocaust-era movies go (Chastain’s maternal saint begins to secretly hide Jews in her cellar), this one is neither too pretty nor too ugly—which might doom it to a particularly banal shade of detachment.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Given its multitalented cast, Rough Night should have committed to the darkness (originally, the screenplay’s title was Move that Body). In execution, the women are asked only for flop sweat and nervous jabbering. Party on.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Clangorous and nonsensical, the fifth installment of the toys-to-world-saviors franchise still has a spark of grandeur that could only come from one director.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    This is welcome summer fare; if we’re going to have space operas, let them sing in the strangest accents possible.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    For all its timeliness, the movie works best when it’s echoing the 15-year-old The Rules of Attraction, upping the vapidity of Ingrid’s prey.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    As exposed as the actors allow themselves to be, their mostly improvised script never takes them anywhere, and the rough edge of their banter seems to acknowledge as much. At least they get to eat.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Beach Rats could have explored that ethical quandary with more depth; instead it settles for something blocked, oblique and fascinating.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    As medium-grade satire (hardly another The Truman Show), Downsizing works fine enough, but it makes a series of calamitous moves that throw off the delicate tone, raising the pretension levels to toxic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The Shape of Water is a movie of too many ideas, including love. For that reason alone, it drinks like a bottomless glass of velvety wine.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It
    Even though our clown-busting heroes predate the sweet kids on Stranger Things, they feel more generic. No performance here captures the adolescent longing that this story—essentially a coming-of-age tale—requires; only Sophia Lillis, playing the “Molly Ringwald” in an all-boys club of self-described losers, comes close to developing a distinct psychology.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director George Clooney raids a leftover script by the Coen brothers that lacks the snap of their more vicious crime comedies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It all really happened but surely with a lot more passion than writer-director Angela Robinson’s script would have it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Marshall isn’t as flashy as it ought to be.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Justice League gets the band together but remembers to bring the banter along with the boom.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The set pieces are grand—gloriously dumb and never realistic enough to make you wince at the fact that billions of microscopic souls are dying before your eyes. Rather, you wince at everything else.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    "Southland Tales" was a soporific mess, and while The Box (based on material by novelist Richard Matheson) is superior by a certain margin, Kelly derails his newfound discipline with the usual shimmering portals and hazy notions of apocalyptic sacrifice.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    This is the ultimate sin of the film, generically helmed by lad-auteur Guy Ritchie: Logic seems to be thrown out the window in order to make room for clashes on a partially completed Tower Bridge. It’s way too elementary.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    It takes a long time for Brothers to become the movie it wants to be, and even then, it stumbles.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Unfortunately, none of the subsequent noise is all that scary, and the striving for "Paranormal Activity’s" buzz is shameless.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cutesy and generic, New York, I Love You is almost colossally inept at capturing five-boroughs flavor.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    An unfocused comedy about weird Army pseudoscience, ends up blinking before we laugh.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Not since a Nam-scarred Sly Stallone asked, "Do we get to win this time?" in "Rambo: First Blood Part II" has an American action star been deployed to rewrite history so thoroughly.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Adult children and friends watch nervously as Pippa reclaims a measure of spunk; too bad it all feels like one of those pharmaceutical ads for longer, healthier lifestyles.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film is set in a celeb-owned Miami restaurant and many of the gags--exploding entrees, the swallowing of a diamond ring, on-the-job drunkenness--feel like leftovers.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Once you get over the droll joke of seeing an equine Web surfer wearing a bathrobe and sipping his morning coffee, the movie settles into a shrill groove from which it never escapes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Shockingly dull.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    There are sparks here that suggest the smarter movie a more scientifically minded director--say, David Cronenberg--might have made.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Better to defrost "Alive" or "The Edge" from the video icebox.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    An eerie resurrection regains some good will, but we'll have to wait for Neshat to catch up with the art of storytelling.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The Losers is the ultimate example, scraped from the bottom of the comic-book barrel, where writer Andy Diggle’s figurine-like characters first had their exploits in an exciting War on Terror.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    With this depressingly bland sequel (scripted by snark specialist Justin Theroux), he’s (Robert Downey Jr.) stranded in lightweight arrogance.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The big absence here is the man himself; Gibney couldn’t get the jailed Abramoff on camera, either due to unwillingness or a Justice Department intervention. Whatever the reason, it’s crippling.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Diced into hash, the action sequences are unusually painful: poundingly loud and punctuated by Liam Neeson's bark, Bradley Cooper's manic heehawing and a total lack of clarity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The sequences in Micmacs are contorted too: impressive and bendy and aggressively shallow.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    No viewer goes into this movie expecting John Cassavetes's "Husbands," least of all from soft-serve director Denis Dugan (You Don't Mess with the Zohan).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Never is the material excited into the kind of playful uncertainty that Rivette all but trademarked; the inertness of the performances robs the movie of spirit.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie you were hoping to avoid.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A proper profile of Hefner would start and end with sex, and not merely glance on casualties like Dorothy Stratten (and even the loveless Hef himself). The movie can't seem to get it up.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Marvel at the desperate spectacle of three comic leads-Aniston, Bateman and Watchmen's Patrick Wilson as the original donor-being outperformed by the wide-eyed Robinson, a quiet collector of silences. These stars will never be as young as he is; you wish they'd all stop trying.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Here's a film that definitely wants to play Hollywood dress-up.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The script, credited to one Bert V. Royal, seems to have been run through an out-of-control sass machine (seriously, it'll make you appreciate Diablo Cody's tact).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Material like this doesn't require the additional strain of overnarrated freeze-frames, a "Cuckoo's Nest" supporting cast of adorable crazies and a Glee-ified musical number set to Queen and David Bowie's "Under Pressure."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    What was Clint thinking? (Or Martin Scorsese, when he made "Shutter Island," for that matter.)
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    This can't be a faithful facsimile of the literary phenomenon currently turning soccer moms into Scandinoir crackheads. Nor can ethical journalist Mikael (Nyqvist), an uncoverer of conspiracies, actually be the dull, Windbreakered nonaction hero onscreen.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    From its title on, Come Undone is as dully generic as is imaginable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The more substantial material, including Spitzer's feuds with vindictive New York politician Joe Bruno and financier Ken Langone, gets short shrift.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    You keep waiting for the movie to grow a brain, for that random attractive neighbor (Wilde) to turn out to be a decoy, for Banks herself to become suspect. Nope. The Next Three Days morphs into "The Fugitive" on steroids.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie dies onscreen; it might be the best advertisement for avoiding the glories of Italy ever released by a Hollywood distributor.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Like a stumpy limb requiring quick cauterization via steam pipe (our first cringe), the Saw series is begging for closure.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Listen to the rhythms of "Broadcast News" - from Holly Hunter's daily crying jags to William Hurt's cock-of-the walk patter - and you'll hear how romantic comedy can approach an art form, a roundelay that requires the ear of a conductor. How Do You Know, James L. Brooks's latest, has such tone-deaf passages that it feels made by a totally different man.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's really no focking place for the franchise to go anymore.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A typically lax late-period Ferrara work, far from the glories of "King of New York."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    How does one remain an unapologetic fan of Vaughn, abrasive though he is, even as his material fails him?
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Sandler's puppy-dog persona is just about ready to be put down. From its title on, this is entertainment for extremely lazy audiences.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Please. If you're going to ask audiences to submit to a dim theater themselves, at least greet them with the proper monster they paid for.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    We've seen Nicolas Cage when he's angry-and we like him when he's angry. So why does this painfully loud revenge movie skimp on the Cage rage?
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Queens-born horror specialist Stevan Mena has mastered the slow camera creep and the unusually artful vista-he even composes his own orchestral scores, good ones. But he needs to give up screenwriting, pronto. Put down the laptop, Stevan.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    In theory, there's nothing wrong when a movie reminds you of TV. (That's where the fun is, anyway.) But when a movie resembles a long-lost, corduroy-clad episode of "The Rockford Files," that's a problem.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A perfectly boring movie from Julian Schnabel - is it possible?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    None of this is particularly well wrought, and only a bizarre gas mask worn by the séance leader counts as an inspired (if slightly silly) touch.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    To the movie's small credit, there's very little grasping for larger significance: It's a dumb horror film, complete with a sexy female lust object (Kaboom's Mesquida) undraping for a shower scene.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The original film, for all its zaniness, existed in a recognizable Koch-era metropolis, one that paradoxically added to our hero's likable haze of denial. This time, the town is far shinier (what recession?).
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    While the movie isn't "Witness," you know that comic scenes of target practice are going to make sense around the bend.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Controversially, Escrivá started the Opus Dei, and There Be Dragons is best appreciated by those seeking more realism than the albino self-whipper of "The Da Vinci Code."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Dedicating a movie to John Hughes doesn't equal capturing the master's ear for the universality of adolescent angst.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The new movie is simpler plotwise (a race to the Fountain of Youth), while at the same time being somehow more deadening.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Some kind of napping for sure: The line between rigor and tedium is crossed in this Madrid-set home-invasion thriller, captured in a dozen or so claustrophobic shots but impoverished as a piece of drama.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Breillat, as always, goes her own way, but her impressionistic scenes barely cohere, even at this brief running time.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    It gets bogged down in slo-mo indie quirk when it should be faster, more in our face.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Depending on what you need from this movie, there's slight redemption in its full-on commitment to raunch, both in baby-shit–to-mouth scatology and some choice zingers.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The hard fact, though, is that Harlin's instincts - always toward the massive and slo-mo - make him a fairly dunderheaded political analyst.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The predictability is crushing, and with movies like "Crazy Heart" and Sofia Coppola's distinctly personal "Somewhere" so close in the rearview, David M. Rosenthal's estrangement drama feels especially soft.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Unfortunately, Truffaut fell into a pit of awkwardness on the project; editingwise, he's hardly in the league of Hitchcock, his sequences rushing ahead, his ironies too obvious. The Bride Wore Black only makes you yearn for better imitators like Brian De Palma. (Unlikely agreement came from Truffaut himself, ever the film critic, who hated his own movie.)
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    J. Edgar is infuriatingly coy and noncritical about its subject, an undeniable patriot but also an alarmist and a ruiner of lives.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Unintentionally true to its title, The Divide first goes for a similar bleakness (it barely registers as entertainment), then lurches into a rousing, vengeful finale; both sides of the equation add up to less than zero.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Filmed with the somber pretentiousness of a "Babel," the movie never quite converts its premise into something grander (never mind believable). Meanwhile, the world starts to riot, yet their bed is warm. Will love save the day? Unfortunately for us, our sense of smell remains intact.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    You doubt Wiseman's sense of pacing. Still, he must have had a good time shooting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Even on its own limited, rigorous aesthetic grounds, there are far superior movies (including all of Tarr's own work). It's a sad way for the 56-year-old to go out, almost a caricature of his funereal mood and of art cinema in general.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Like all advertisements, this scripted movie is a perfect fantasy: expertly coordinated, simplistic (the bad guys like yachts and bikini girls while our heroes have loving families) and more than a little scary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie is one big scream, clichéd and hardly credible as an oblique call to civility.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Let's not make 4:44 Last Day on Earth sound cooler than it is. Compared with Lars von Trier's histrionically doomed "Melancholia," the film lacks any serious attempt to grapple with mortality.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Fresnadillo, working with screenwriters Nicolás Casariego and Jaime Marques, might be angling for the same YA fantasy as "Pan's Labyrinth," but they've forgotten about that film's violent underpinnings, a mistake that leaches their movie of suspense.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Close to a parody of a French sex drama - complete with bored, bourgie bed-swappers and a dull sense of amoral sophistication - this autopiloted import does no favors to the legacies of Truffaut and Godard.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Green was meant for quick-witted comedy. Unfortunately, she's becoming a mainstay of painfully sincere slogs.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    All of them slog through countless boring sword-and-sandal skirmishes, none of which feel remotely suspenseful, until the hugeness of it all becomes a mildly passable joke.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's Goldthwait's first misstep, a serious one. He's simply not the filmmaker to mount a fierce takedown of Kardashian culture, thorough though his script's rage is.

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