Joshua Rothkopf
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For 652 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Particle Fever
Lowest review score: 20 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 652
652 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    A fascinating experiment is about to happen, and who doesn't want to be part of a little fun? That rarest of birds - a b&w silent film - is set to swoop into multiplexes. Trust us, it won't bite.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    If the movie falls just shy of our highest mark, this is because Cronenberg is tamping down on his usually naturalistic performances - everything feels vaguely mad-scientist-ish.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Occasionally, the movie italicizes its points with heavy musical drones, but its tone is remarkably even and concentrated: It makes sense that Jolie excels at stewarding the scenes she usually tears apart onscreen: two people struggling in an emotional death grip, the camera up close.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    What's missing, then? There's no fiery central performance in the mix (the horse doesn't count), and once Emily Watson's hardscrabble mom is rotated out of the action, you yearn for an anchor.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    This isn't the kind of doc to explain everything (or anything, really)-it does honor its subject, though, and that's plenty.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's here, in a keenly captured Forest Hills, Queens, land of low-lit bars and manicured lawns, that Roadie soars as a gently comic drama about living the dream - or trying to.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's a wild, "Miami Blues"–like dreaminess to the movie that's addictive. If anything, it shows up exactly what "Little Miss Sunshine" lacked: plenty of ammo.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's still tremendous vitality here, and Wheatley's avoidance of yet another Guy Ritchie gabfest is a pleasure in itself.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Return is almost too underdramatized to seem like a piece of today's zoomy entertainment, but its anxieties-the bare cupboards, the vague sense of purposelessness-are at the heart of the American experience for many. It's what indie filmmaking ought to be.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Brace yourself and go see it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Moments like these turn the documentary Undefeated into a far greater thing than a real-life "The Blind Side" - it's diving deeply into knotty matters of patience and parenting, along with plenty of unfixables as well.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Deeply irresponsible, this a film that will give parents seizures-and Roger Corman a big old smile.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cedar's idiosyncratically brilliant script also has a moral question at its heart: Is lying to spare someone's feelings ever justified? Surely the Talmud has a thing or two to say about that.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    You will see the man toiling and revising - killing off half-good ideas, struggling for clarity - and it's a routine well worth demystifying.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    If the movie had a lead actress more delicate or malleable than the strong-cheeked Lawrence-a Natalie Portman, say-it would tip over into sexy-girl-killer celebration; the same goes for Harrelson's salty mentor, who is never too supportive or paternal. Both performers lean into the economies of survival, certain of the savagery that lies ahead, and come up with sharp work.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's the stuff of melodrama, heightened by Davies's pitch-perfect use of pop songs, like a sad "You Belong to Me," slurred by a misty crowd in a bar.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Lockout is the kind of manly nonsense no one wants to make anymore.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Charmingly, like a throwback to the pre-Twitter age, here's a horror film that's been made with no reasonable way to discuss it beforehand.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The action scenes-blissfully easy to follow-are where Whedon makes the giant leap into the big leagues.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Rarely do movies-never mind foreign ones, of any nationality - explore an honest-to-God ethical quandary. Elena, in its concentrated austerity, often resembles a lost chapter of Krzysztof Kieslowski's Ten Commandments–themed Decalogue.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    You do sense, though, that the people behind MIB3 (mainly veteran producer Walter F. Parkes and script doctor David Koepp) were smart enough to let the audience grow up a bit, enough to get the Andy Warhol jokes and one brilliantly weird creation, a delicate alien who can see every outcome at once.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Kinji Fukasaku's slick, sick nightmare is best left to the quasi-banned realm where it exists as a perfect satire; when brought into reality, it's a touch awkward.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Organizing the mercurial emotions and tics is director Joachim Trier, making good on the promise of his 2006 feature debut, the lit-related drama Reprise. This one's even better-it's about the honesty that often takes root in survivors, a rarely explored subject-but Oslo, August 31st is not an easy film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    There has to be room for this kind of plea, especially a work that, obliquely, captures so many largely unreported details: the night raids rounding up children, the torn-up olive trees and kids' soccer games in the battle zone.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Nothing about the movie is showy, except for Shelton's palpable love of good people making a mess of things. Barring some late-inning coyness, it's some of the truest, dinged-heart couples' circling of the year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Didn't Soderbergh notice there was pathos enough in Matthew McConaughey's beefcake proprietor, an ab-slapping, spandexed Peter Pan? Between this role and his owlish DA in the subversively sly "Bernie," the actor has finally found a way to subvert his six-pack. He's the magic here.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Blessed with an improbable-but-true story that functions on many ironic levels, this clever documentary ultimately conveys more about the complex American character - shifting between intimacy and criminality - than a whole shelf of fiction films.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The spirit of the movie is nonjudgmental, an observational intimacy that, in turn, becomes inspiring.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Morley has at least restored something of a soul to her subject.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The new drama, best viewed as a church movie, is a return to the kind of corner-chat indie cinema Lee revolutionized, with an emphasis on a towering performance by The Wire's Clarke Peters as a local bishop inflamed with the Word.