Joshua Rothkopf
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For 693 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem
Lowest review score: 20 Antichrist
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 693
693 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's the stuff of melodrama, heightened by Davies's pitch-perfect use of pop songs, like a sad "You Belong to Me," slurred by a misty crowd in a bar.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Forgive this film its marvelous moodiness — someone needs to go there once in a while.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Rarely do movies-never mind foreign ones, of any nationality - explore an honest-to-God ethical quandary. Elena, in its concentrated austerity, often resembles a lost chapter of Krzysztof Kieslowski's Ten Commandments–themed Decalogue.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    As time-travel action films go, here's one that's brainy, stylish and carries itself with B-flick modesty - all of which feels like some kind of alchemy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Suleiman can be criticized for failing, ever so slightly, at crafting an overall structure-his latest, based on his dad's diary and other memories, is an autobiographical story of exile and return that skips like a stone over water, fleetly but not so deeply. Still, this is a welcome example of kitsch wedded to serious indictment.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Directors Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg are unusually committed to maritime mechanics, and the excitement grows as steadily as the sailors’ beards.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Occasionally, the movie italicizes its points with heavy musical drones, but its tone is remarkably even and concentrated: It makes sense that Jolie excels at stewarding the scenes she usually tears apart onscreen: two people struggling in an emotional death grip, the camera up close.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Kuhns makes time for political insights, provocative montages of race riots cut with the movie’s hick militia, and the comments of owlish Romero himself, who recounts the shoot like the enthusiastic 27-year-old he was.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    What's missing, then? There's no fiery central performance in the mix (the horse doesn't count), and once Emily Watson's hardscrabble mom is rotated out of the action, you yearn for an anchor.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The first and only piece of advice needed on one’s way to the fishing pond is this: Bring your patience. Not surprisingly, the same could be said to a viewer of this slow-building but riveting experimental collage.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cedar's idiosyncratically brilliant script also has a moral question at its heart: Is lying to spare someone's feelings ever justified? Surely the Talmud has a thing or two to say about that.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The new Let Me In does more than merely preserve the original's mood; it actually improves on it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    If you're even slightly interested in folk music, there will be something here to simmer that curiosity into a full-on boil: the Arabic trip-hop stylings of monomonikered rapper-singer Raiz, raspy Pietra Montecorvino's Stevie Nicks–like dance tunes, a gorgeous sax solo from local jazz legend James Senese.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Only 20 minutes in and you’re not going to think of another lead who could pull off this kind of reckoning — tangy, furious and about to become whip-smart.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Stripped to a minimum of editorializing (but, like "The Hurt Locker," flush with sympathy), this Afghanistan-shot war documentary takes its cues from the unblinking style of cinema verité.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie deepens as Nelly, destined for the gossip columns and a peripheral attachment, becomes painfully aware of her own fragility (Jones’s performance is devastating).
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Lockout is the kind of manly nonsense no one wants to make anymore.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Charmingly, like a throwback to the pre-Twitter age, here's a horror film that's been made with no reasonable way to discuss it beforehand.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cry foul, you documentary purists, but narration by Jena Malone and others pulls the gamble off. The film makes its point ingeniously.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Make room for the modest but affecting pleasures of veteran actors tearing into the subject of golden-years resignation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Inception, though, is no "Avatar"--instead, it’s the movie that many wanted "Avatar" to be. In a roaringly fast first hour, we’re introduced to a new technology that allows for the bodily invasion of another person’s dreamworld.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The new drama, best viewed as a church movie, is a return to the kind of corner-chat indie cinema Lee revolutionized, with an emphasis on a towering performance by The Wire's Clarke Peters as a local bishop inflamed with the Word.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s a portrait that’s equal parts shtick and soul — in other words, exactly what "The Love Guru" should have been.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie isn’t quite suitable for the extremely young, but its apocalyptic tint may be catnip for smart preteens. They’ll breathe in the chilly air of a mysterious forest--the way forests should be.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Where he ends up going—a place of real anxiety and envy—speaks to the filmmaker’s nervy ambitions. If this is Baumbach’s commercial breakthrough, he will have made it several steps up that staircase with nothing lost.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    As presented here (cut down from a longer edit), the film might have benefitted from more technical context related to the plant’s failure — this is a cautionary tale worth heeding. But the voices are valuable enough.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s a movie about coming to peace with solitude, leagues beyond most biopics.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The documentary is strongest during these conference-room brainstorms, similar to those of a political campaign. (It could have used more of Boies’s witness-demolishing courtroom eloquence.) The draw here is watching a careful process unfold, regardless of the outcome.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    You can't believe what you're watching: Compliance, true to its title, digs into the rarely explored subject of psychological acquiescence (behavioral scientist Stanley Milgram should get a cowriting credit), with common-sense dignity being the first casualty.

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