Joshua Rothkopf
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For 705 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Before Midnight
Lowest review score: 20 I Melt with You
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 705
705 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Love Crime soon plummets into a flashback-laden mess, a shame since it was marginally stronger as a psychosexual game of dominance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The esteemed director, Ken Loach, isn’t really a fantasist--and it shows.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The funny thing? It all works reasonably well, especially if you have a yen for the urbane register of city kids and their amazingly cool parents.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's too much going on here - of a winning, thoughtful nature - to dismiss Josh Radnor's back-to-college romance as the nostalgia bath it mainly is.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Too many digital effects ruin the spell of a tactile world of evil objects scheming your demise. But even a mediocre FD is better than more Jigsaw.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Tuschi leans too far into an admiring position, and you thirst for some commonsense critique. It's all a bit rich.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Al Pacino’s done so much Acting over the last 25 years (hoo-ah), it’s disquieting to see him digging deep again—often with subtlety—into a rich role with hidden depths.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    As brought to life in the stentorian tones of Ben Kingsley, the curator comes off like a driven visionary, but his actual efforts aren't dramatized enough. The paintings speak more articulately: doomy, dank colors and oppressive shapes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Breathtaking imagery competes with a scary lack of human interest in this hypnotic, potentially alienating documentary.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Weaknesses from the original remain, including a mustache-twirling villain straight out of a Bond film (Sharlto Copley) and a Freudian master plan that unravels the more you think about it. Give credit to Lee for staying fresh, even if this feels like slumming.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Simply skip the first part entirely: "Killer Instinct" bulges with a disconnected jumble of nightclub attacks and fence-clipping escapes you've seen better elsewhere. Yet a tide change happens with the superior Public Enemy No. 1, which takes the subject's raging ego as its cue.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It exists in fits and starts: a Blade Runner–esque moment of rainy contemplation on a hotel balcony; some weird sexual tension with a lizard girl (statuesque Svetlana Khodchenkova) who steals away Wolverine’s healing powers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Now, with this underwhelming sequel, Spain proves it can stand toe to toe with any nation in the manufacture of unnecessary follow-ups.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film wants to be inspiring, when it might have been cosmic-a far greater ambition. Tossing boats and dreamers, the huge waves perform beautifully.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    LaMarque foregrounds her scenario’s awkwardness—it never quite feels like a comedy—and the pair of male suitors she brings in (Jake Johnson and Ron Livingston) are, refreshingly, as unfixed as her main character. But you still wish Kazan had more to work with.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Unknown is probably the movie "The Tourist" wanted to be, if it had a pulse. Its sheer momentum makes Neeson and Kruger more attractive than even Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Based on a banned short story from the 1920s, Caterpillar might be read as a reaction to hawkish nationalism, but it's more a cry for the unknown soldier in the kitchen and bedroom.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Those euphoric moments, scored to Black Sabbath, show the brothers sneaking out in their masks, discovering activism and growing into individuals. You’ll wish Moselle had started, not ended, there.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It probably would have helped if Walker (who credits two other codirectors) had chosen just one of those avenues for deeper study; her doc has a vertiginous way of feeling arty and ephemeral at one moment, humane and maybe too earthbound the next.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The sincere director, Oliver Schmitz, injects too much movie into his movie; life (above all) would have been enough.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Even though Unfriended begins to cheat, springing loud noises and gory cutaways that can’t be explained, there’s a rigor to its dopey, blood-simple conception that you might smile at.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    None of this is particularly well wrought, and only a bizarre gas mask worn by the séance leader counts as an inspired (if slightly silly) touch.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    While Transcendence has tons of money to spend on unpersuasive digital effects and dronelike music, it shows little interest in exploring the potentially tricky benefits of a computer-enhanced intellect; it’s not even in the enjoyable realm of starkly ridiculous Cold War thrillers like "Colossus: The Forbin" Project.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Peter Webber, who once mined social unease from the painterly "Girl with a Pearl Earring," is out of his depth; this is a movie in desperate need of a no-nonsense Howard Hawks.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Admission’s comedy has walls built around it; director Paul Weitz (About a Boy), normally a softener of harsh edges, might have been stymied by Fey’s snappy persona.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    A new Red Dawn could have been so much more fun had it thrown a properly out-of-bounds tea party. (It lacks the signature brawn of original director John Milius, a guns-first libertarian.)
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Like all advertisements, this scripted movie is a perfect fantasy: expertly coordinated, simplistic (the bad guys like yachts and bikini girls while our heroes have loving families) and more than a little scary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    You doubt Wiseman's sense of pacing. Still, he must have had a good time shooting.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Only Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani, directors of 2009’s stylish Amer, emerge intact with “O Is for Orgasm,” a surging montage of fluid colors and moans.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    To the movie's small credit, there's very little grasping for larger significance: It's a dumb horror film, complete with a sexy female lust object (Kaboom's Mesquida) undraping for a shower scene.

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