Joshua Rothkopf

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For 875 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens
Lowest review score: 20 Let's Be Cops
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 50 out of 875
875 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    You feel for the potential Wesleyan parent who asks an administrator if his daughter is going to have to move home after graduating: His question is met with an uneasy pause. Crucial stuff.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Monsters University aces a two-part test—first, appealing to kids with gorgeous, hyperrealistic animation that teases out every pink hair on a beastly art student; then luring in parents with several knowing jokes about strumming your guitar on the quad or playing beer pong.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Crisply and efficiently, we're transported to the realm of the kidnapping thriller--and if Brit writer-director J Blakeson knew how to sustain tension for another hour and change, we'd be heralding the next Jonathan "Sexy Beast" Glazer.
    • Time Out New York
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie ultimately feels both too glib and too hermetically sealed to resonate beyond its chaotic interiors.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Some viewers might give the movie a few extra points for its retro vibe of taciturn badassedness. But little punctures the wall of emotional remove-the pulse rate is way too controlled for entertainment's sake.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    When the movie remembers to be the drug-spiked, hard-R comedy you hope for, it’s more than just a fun romp (and, incidentally, superior to "Forgetting Sarah Marshall," the rom-com from which its Britpop libertine spins off).
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The images wash over you - lush, gorgeous, impeccably framed - just as they did in Ron Fricke's wordless meditation "Baraka" (1992).
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The script, partly credited to Lost's Damon Lindelof, is so filled with talky lectures about divinity (and boner plot holes) that you realize, with embarrassment, that Scott, at age 74, wants to join the cosmic company of Terrence Malick. Does he not think that making a drum-tight horror film was ambitious enough?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie looks beautiful, its sublime b&w cinematography signaling a fading dream. And there are touching moments here that you rarely see in docs about professional musicians or celebrities in general.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Tyrannosaur won't translate into entertainment, nor as a wake-up call to the dark side of humanity - though it does work nicely as a tart slice of hard-bitten acting; the entire cast is superb.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    For a sci-fi indie of vast ambition but limited means, Coherence does a sterling job with coherence.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Generation P is worth struggling through, even if it boggles you. In many ways, it's a keyhole into the future of the entire world.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Night Catches Us surges awkwardly in its latter third, suddenly aware that a promising setup isn't enough. Regardless, here is an honorable attempt to address a complex chapter of African-American pride, one that's usually hidden under hairdos and wah-wah pedals.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The Rover is almost worth it for the coiled central performance of Guy Pearce, who outfuries Mel Gibson with his pinpoint shotgun skills and monomaniacal quest.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Just as soon as that rarest Lebowskian blend of casual pursuit and big-world conspiracy begins to emerge from the fog, Cold Weather appears to lose its nerve (or run out of money).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    West holds your interest with material that should feel like a rip-off of The Shining. If this is mere placeholding until something more ambitious comes along for the rising director, it'll do.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Sometimes, the debunking is overshadowed by cringe-inducing graphics involving pills with little legs running toward a finish line.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cry foul, you documentary purists, but narration by Jena Malone and others pulls the gamble off. The film makes its point ingeniously.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Closer to a special episode of "Diff’rent Strokes" than to "12 Years a Slave," the movie seems to exist to give its white characters belated moments of conscience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Best are the film's tender ghostly visitations from Dad, evoked with a minimum of artiness, and the authentic, impoverished locations.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 20 Joshua Rothkopf
    A ridiculously infantile film, one that flatters itself by intimating a deeper comment about suppressed masculinity or romantic passivity.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Ruffalo, a master of rumpled befuddlement, finds his signature role here—it can't be overstated how deftly he eases into the tricky creation, a blue-blooded slacker who aches when the world won't hug him back.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cheadle is so good as the cryptic Davis—coiled to strike, soulful, wounded, boldly outspoken—that you wonder if a more traditionally structured biojazz picture à la Ray or Bird might have been a better showcase for what's obviously a passion project.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    And then, Robert Duvall appears—or, should I say, insinuates himself out of the muck. Cagily, his character wends his way into the story, played by the one American actor who might best understand the limits of bluster. “It’s foolish to ask for luxuries in times like these,” he mutters in the Duvall twang, the weather and indignity beaten into him, and The Road suddenly feels major.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    One of [Moore's] more hopeful and celebratory efforts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's a quietly witty film, much like the dude himself.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    St. Vincent has nothing on Rushmore, an obvious forebearer, even though it strains for the same egalitarian spirit of thrown-together family, one that includes a pregnant Russian stripper (Naomi Watts) and a sympathetic but firm Catholic schoolteacher (Chris O’Dowd).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s a portrait that’s equal parts shtick and soul — in other words, exactly what "The Love Guru" should have been.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Still, the problem that often fells these documentaries - humorlessness - has been licked: Jack Black makes an exuberant cameo pitching recycled toilet water (his fake brand is called Porcelain Springs). Sound gross? Open wide, because it's on the menu for all of us.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Brace yourself and go see it.

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