Joshua Rothkopf
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For 699 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Love Is Strange
Lowest review score: 20 Skyline
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 699
699 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    If this profile is marred slightly by thematic tidiness and a willingness to overglorify the champion's rise (Fischer didn't even write his best-seller, Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess), it still supplies a cracked, conflicted genius trapped in his ceaseless endgame.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Deeply irresponsible, this a film that will give parents seizures-and Roger Corman a big old smile.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    It teases out the distinctly modern subject of celebrity profile-writing, a rare one for the movies, detouring into avenues of attraction and envy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Walker integrates stranger-on-the-street testimony to further her general vibe of ignorance, thus pinpointing the true target of an agitated doc--our own blithe apathy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Stations of the Elevated plays like a time capsule, particularly for having no dialogue or plot. It swings to Charles Mingus’s hardest bop and evokes a long-gone city, somehow more adult and confrontational even in silence.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    You'll be arguing with your friends about the ethics of secrecy and defense for hours; that's what makes these exit interviews so essential. They come late to the spy game, but are welcome regardless.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    For a movie that's essentially about a piece of hardware-the legendary Neve mixing console, an imposing slab of knobs and meters - this geeked-out documentary beats with more heart than could be imagined.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Almost as an afterthought to the ringingly true performances--and Marco Bellocchio’s unusually approachable direction--comes a deft analysis of fascism, likened to lovesickness, insanity and a gust of orchestral strings. It’s all of that and more, not to mention a lousy matchmaker.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    This isn't the kind of doc to explain everything (or anything, really)-it does honor its subject, though, and that's plenty.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Return is almost too underdramatized to seem like a piece of today's zoomy entertainment, but its anxieties-the bare cupboards, the vague sense of purposelessness-are at the heart of the American experience for many. It's what indie filmmaking ought to be.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Brace yourself and go see it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    You will see the man toiling and revising - killing off half-good ideas, struggling for clarity - and it's a routine well worth demystifying.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's savvy in Schwarzenegger's understanding of his appeal. Always foreign yet weirdly Americanized in our dreams, the big guy is a craggy monument in need of a countryside. He's back in the place that deserves him.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    And then, Robert Duvall appears—or, should I say, insinuates himself out of the muck. Cagily, his character wends his way into the story, played by the one American actor who might best understand the limits of bluster. “It’s foolish to ask for luxuries in times like these,” he mutters in the Duvall twang, the weather and indignity beaten into him, and The Road suddenly feels major.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The real richness of the movie, though, comes well in, as the improvised script gets around to deeper anxieties of aging and avoidance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Moments like these turn the documentary Undefeated into a far greater thing than a real-life "The Blind Side" - it's diving deeply into knotty matters of patience and parenting, along with plenty of unfixables as well.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    For a group with property assets in the billions, it’s a major piece of the puzzle, revealing a critical failing: For a religion with so much to give, why do they do so little for so few?
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Even if the music leaves you cold, there’s plenty of captivating awkwardness here, like Paul McCartney listlessly watching the monitors in his dressing room, or producer Harvey Weinstein solving a tech issue by calling Google exec Eric Schmidt in the audience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Often, Faust plays like a lost cousin to Andrei Tarkovsky’s haunted Stalker (1979), catnip for the slow-and-low crowd. Settle in, because this requires your charity, but you’ll dream it all back up the next night.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Luca Guadagnino is having so much fun setting up the Kubrickian chill (even Barry Lyndon's Marisa Berenson is on hand) that when Emma and the much younger Antonio finally come together in warming Sanremo, their tryst almost sneaks up on you.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Director Nicolas Winding Refn, the prankster of last year's "Bronson," has never reduced his craft to such a sledgehammer of minimalism. Electric guitars drone on the soundtrack, bones crunch, and a mystical religiosity gathers around One-Eye; there's a midnight cult here for those who yearn for one.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The film has a traditional appeal that's wholly separate from its surface.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    A darkly stylish horror film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Eventually it’s go time, and if The East loses a little steam on the grounds of action mechanics (a skill these plots always require), it’s never dumb on the subject of covert allegiances.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The real heat of The Sessions comes from its pitch-perfect sense of place, the free-spirited Berkeley of the 1980s.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie's real asset is Reynolds himself, utilizing his comedy chops for unexpected levity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    When you have an actor as suggestive as Kazan, swallowing up the lens with allure and complexity, your writer-director becomes superfluous.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Buzzard is both deeply unfun and something you can’t take your eyes off. It gets our edge of recommendation because there’s real focus to it: Marty’s ambitions are so low (his life seems to climax while wolfing down a $20 plate of spaghetti in a hotel room) that you truly fear for the future. Meet the new slacker.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cuarón, a magician who brought personality to the Harry Potter series, is after pure, near-experimental spectacle.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    None of this is pushed into comic relief—the filmmaker lets his drama play out with gentleness — and you smile at the many evolutions.

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